Subscribe to
"Animal of the day"

AddThis Feed Button
Or subscribe by e-mail

Enter your Email


Powered by FeedBlitz

We hope that reader will gain an increased appreciation of the need for more conservation measure in order to protect the beautiful creatures that inhabit the earth. Our philosophy is that the more we learn about animals, the more we respect them and take better care of them. That is why we update this blog with new animals, We encourage you to syndicate our content by adding "animal of the day" to your own blog! (read more)

About us

Our mission is to get people excited about animals and their welfare by writing articles on these animals. We encourage people to comment on posts and share with others. Don't forget to subscribe to our feed.

Contact us
Copyright notice

Cutest pet ever - cutest pet contest

Funny animal videos and pictures

Swimming with manatees - harmful or helpful

Calendar

« May 2017
S M T W T F S
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31      

Archives

Next Archive Previous Archive

01 May - 31 May 2013
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2013
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2013
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2013
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2013
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2012
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2012
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2012
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2012
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2012
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2012
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2012
01 May - 31 May 2012
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2012
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2012
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2012
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2012
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2011
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2011
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2011
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2011
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2011
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2011
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2011
01 May - 31 May 2011
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2011
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2011
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2011
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2011
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2010
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2010
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2010
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2010
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2010
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2010
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2010
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2010
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2010
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2010
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2009
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2009
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2009
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2009
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2009
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2009
01 May - 31 May 2009
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2009
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2009
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2009
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2008
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2008
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2008
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2008
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2008
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2008
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2008
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2008
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2008
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2008
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2007
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2007
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2007
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2007
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2007
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2007
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2007
01 May - 31 May 2007
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2007
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2007
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2007
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2007
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2006
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2006
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2006
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2006
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2006
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2006
01 May - 31 May 2006
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2006
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2006
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2006
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2006
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2005
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2005
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2005
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2005
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2005
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2005

Animal pictures
Mammals.start4all.com
Animal diversity web
Recently extinct animals forum
Another chance to see

Miscellany

AddThis Feed Button

Tuesday 21 November 2006 Asian elephant

Asian elephantThe Asian elephant (Elephas maximus), is one of the three species of elephant. It lives in areas in India, Southeast Asia, including the Indonesian islands of Sumatra and Borneo. It is distinguishable by its smaller size and its smaller ears, compared to African elephants. Small is relative in this case, since the Asian elephant can weigh up to 5000 kilograms and 4 meters in height! Females live in groups, bulls are solitary. The oldest female leads the group and guides their movement in search for food and water. The young hold their mother's or their sister's tail when following the group. If they are in danger, the elephants run with their tails in the air, signalling the other herd members that there is danger. After 15 years, bulls enter sexual maturity, and enter a period called 'musth' each year, in which their testosterone levels soar and they become extemely aggressive. Asian elephants are considered 'endangered' by the IUCN.

Photography by Semnoz, July 2004, licensed under GFDL

You can help spreading the word about this animal by liking it on facebook

Permanent Link

Monday 13 November 2006 Pig-footed Bandicoot

Pig footed bandicootThe Pig-footed Bandicoot (Chaeropus ecaudatus) once lived in Australia, but is now extinct. It ranged from Western Australia, through South Australia and the southern part of the Northern Territory, to southwestern New South Wales and western Victoria in a variety of habitatss. It got its name from their forefeet, which had only two functional toes with hoof-like nails. It became extinct in the 20th century, but before that their numbers were declining through the second part of the 19th century. The cause of their extinction remains unanswered. The most destructive species, foxes and rabbits, were introduced later than their decline started. The most plausible reason of their decline is that with the settlement of Europeans in Australia, their habitat changed by introducing livestock and putting an end to aboriginal land-management. The aboriginals before the Europeans settlers burned small areas to provide fresh, regenerated areas, with a new supply of food.

Picture of a pig-footed bandicoot specimen by Peter Halasz, licensed under GFDL.

Links

IUCN 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

You can help spreading the word about this animal by liking it on facebook

Permanent Link

Sunday 12 November 2006 Donkey or ass

donkeyThe donkey or ass (Equus asinus) is a member of Horse family. Wild donkeys are only found in Northern Africa and the Arabian peninsula and can become 25 to 30 years of age. Predators of the donkey are lions and wolves. Donkeys have great sense of self-preservation, hence they will not do anything which will put themselves in any danger. This behavior has resulted in donkeys being called stubborn, although this is the result of the misinterpretation of their behavior. A donkey can be cross-bred with a horse to produce a mule or a hinny. A hinny is the offspring of a male horse and a female donkey (jenny). A mule is the offspring of a male donkey (jack) and a female horse. Both are almost always sterile since horses have 64 chromosomes and donkeys have 62, which results in offspring with an uneven 63 chromosomes. You can help spreading the word about this animal by liking it on facebook

Permanent Link

Thursday 09 November 2006 The Western Long-beaked Echidna

Long beaked echidnaThe Western Long-beaked Echidna (Zaglossus bruijni) is one of four living species of Echidnas (The Cyclops Long-beaked Echidna was recently discovered). The Western Long-beaked Echidna species live in New Guinea, but earlier fossils indicate that they once also occurred in Australia. Echidnas are, together with platypuses, the only known mammals that lay eggs. Together, they are placed in the order Monotremata. The difference between the short-beaked echidna and the long-beaked echidna is that the short-beaked eats termites and ants, while the long-beaked echidna eats earthworms. The Western Long-beaked Echidna is listed as endangered by the IUCN. Their main threats are habitat destruction and hunting.

Image licensed under GFDL

You can help spreading the word about this animal by liking it on facebook

Permanent Link

Monday 06 November 2006 Yellow-shouldered Fruit Bat

Yellow shouldered batThe Yellow-shouldered Fruit Bat (Sturnira lilium) lives in the area from northern Mexico to Uruguay, eastern Barzil and northern Argentina. Most yellow shouldered bat males have patches of orange fur over glands on their shoulders, which give the species their name. These glands are also used to attract females. Its diet consists of fruit, insects and pollen. The yellow-shouldered fruit bat is common to abundant.

Image of the yellow shouldered fruit bat by A. Martin, with permission from Regua.co.uk

You can help spreading the word about this animal by liking it on facebook

Permanent Link

Thursday 02 November 2006 Ringtail

ringtailThe ringtail (Bassariscus astutus) is a member of the raccoon family and lives in the mountains, badlands and forests in southwestern United States to Baja California and southern Mexico (source and range map). It got its name from its black and white striped tail. The ringtail is an agile climber, their ankle joint can turn 180 degrees and can become 7 years of age in the wild. They are most active at dusk and at night, when they feed on insects, squirrels, rodents, rabbits, and occasionally birds, lizards, snakes, frogs, carrion and plants. When ringtails feel threatened, they bristle the hair on its tail, pulling its tail towards its head to look bigger. The scientific Latin name can be translated as cunning little fox. You can help spreading the word about this animal by liking it on facebook

Permanent Link