Subscribe to
"Animal of the day"

AddThis Feed Button
Or subscribe by e-mail

Enter your Email


Powered by FeedBlitz

We hope that reader will gain an increased appreciation of the need for more conservation measure in order to protect the beautiful creatures that inhabit the earth. Our philosophy is that the more we learn about animals, the more we respect them and take better care of them. That is why we update this blog with new animals, We encourage you to syndicate our content by adding "animal of the day" to your own blog! (read more)

About us

Our mission is to get people excited about animals and their welfare by writing articles on these animals. We encourage people to comment on posts and share with others. Don't forget to subscribe to our feed.

Contact us
Copyright notice

Funny animal videos and pictures

Swimming with manatees - harmful or helpful

Calendar

« July 2019
S M T W T F S
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31      

Archives

Next Archive Previous Archive

01 Nov - 30 Nov 2015
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2015
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2013
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2013
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2013
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2013
01 May - 31 May 2013
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2013
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2013
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2013
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2013
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2012
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2012
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2012
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2012
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2012
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2012
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2012
01 May - 31 May 2012
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2012
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2012
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2012
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2012
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2011
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2011
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2011
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2011
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2011
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2011
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2011
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2011
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2011
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2010
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2010
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2010
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2010
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2010
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2010
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2010
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2009
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2009
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2009
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2008
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2008
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2008
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2008
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2008
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2008
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2008
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2007
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2007
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2007
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2007
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2007
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2007
01 May - 31 May 2007
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2007
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2007
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2007
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2007
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2006
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2006
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2006
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2006
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2006
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2006
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2006
01 May - 31 May 2006
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2006
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2006
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2006
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2006
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2005
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2005
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2005
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2005
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2005
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2005

Animal pictures
Mammals.start4all.com
Animal diversity web
Recently extinct animals forum
Another chance to see

Miscellany

AddThis Feed Button

« Douc Langur - Endange… | Home | Doria's tree-kangaroo… »

Giant Mottled Eel -- Large Eel with a Long Migration

Giant mottled eelThe mottled eel or giant mottled eel (Anguilla marmorata) is an important source of food for many people living in tropical countries. Young eels are found in fresh water and brackish water in lakes, rivers and estuaries. Adults swim to the saltwater of the Indian and Pacific Oceans in order to breed. They are found as far north as Japan and as far south as the Galapagos Islands. They also inhabit the African river of the Zambezi.

Because of overharvesting and water pollution, the giant mottled eel is rare in some of its usual habitat, but is not listed as an endangered species. However, the national government of Taiwan as declared it an endangered species. Attempts to introduce the giant mottled eel to Hawaii as a food source have failed, although individual eels are occasionally found living in the Hawaiian Islands.

Physical Description

Newly hatched larvae, called leptocephali, are shaped like tiny leaves. As they get older, they transform into miniature adults. Juveniles are yellow and black and go through a silver phase until they get their adult coloration. Adults are long, hose-shaped fish with small fins from the middle of the back and around the tail and right behind the gills. The skin is spotted shades of brown, green and grey in a pattern similar to a tabby cat. The undersides are pale gray to white. The small eyes perch on the top of the head. The mouth appears very large in relation to the rest of the body.

Females are usually larger than males. Females can grow to a length of 6.6 feet (2 meters) while males only grow to 4.9 feet (1.5 meters.) Full-grown males and females can weigh up to 45 pounds (20.5 kilograms.) Giant mottled eels are often harvested when they weigh only 26.45 pounds (12 kilograms.)

Life Cycle and Behavior

Giant mottled eels stay near the bottom of a water body, resting during the day and searching for food at night. Their varied diet includes frogs, crabs, fish and shrimp. They are unaggressive towards people. Their short front fins are strong enough for the eel to use as primitive legs so it can crawl from one body of water to another. They may do that during dry seasons. When they are anywhere from 8 to 20 years old, they become large enough to become sexually mature and move out to sea to spawn.

Eggs are lain in deep waters and when they hatch the leptocephali eat plankton until they are large enough to travel to brackish water. This is when they are about 114 to 132 days old. When they reach freshwater or brackish water, they transform into elvers or young eels. With luck, a giant mottled eel can live for 40 years!


Add your thoughts about this animal:

You can help spreading the word about this animal by liking it on facebook
  
Remember personal info?

Emoticons / Textile

Comment moderation is enabled on this site. This means that your comment will not be visible on this site until it has been approved by an editor.

  ( Logged in as )

Notify:
Hide email:

Small print: All html tags except <b> and <i> will be removed from your comment. You can make links by just typing the url or mail-address.