List of endangered birds species

This is the list of all the birds of which we know that have a 'Endangered' or Critically Endangered Status on the IUCN Red list.

Gundlach's Hawk - Its natural habitats are dry forests and lowland moist forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Narcondam Hornbill - The Narcondam Hornbill is a species of hornbill in the Bucerotidae family. It is endemic to the Indian island of Narcondam in the Andamans.
Writhed-billed Hornbill - The Rufous-headed Hornbill , also known as the Visayan Wrinkled Hornbill, Walden's Hornbill or Writhed-billed Hornbill, is a critically endangered species of hornbill living in the rainforests on the islands of Negros and Panay in the Philippines. It is closely related to the Writhed Hornbill, but can be recognized by the yellow throat and ocular skin in the male, and the blue throat and ocular skin in the female . Its binomial name commemorates the Scottish ornithologist Viscount Walden.
Bokikokiko - The Bokikokiko is a species of warbler in the Acrocephalidae family. It is found only on Kiritimati .
Cape Verde Warbler - This small passerine bird is a species found in well-vegetated valleys, avoiding drier areas. It nests in reedbeds, 2-3 eggs are laid in a suspended nest.
Tahiti Reed-Warbler - There are numerous subspecies, but some have been elevated to full species rank in recent times. The nominate race Acrocephalus caffer caffer - the Tahiti Reed-warbler proper - is restricted to Tahiti, with a population of less than a thousand individuals. Other races include:
Millerbird - The Millerbird is a species of Old World warbler in the family Acrocephalidae. It had two subspecies, A. f. kingi and A f. familiaris. The latter, the Laysan Millerbird, became extinct sometime between 1916 and 1923. The former, the critically endangered Nihoa Millerbird, remains the only race left, inhabiting the small island Nihoa in Hawaiʻi. It is the only Old World warbler to have colonised Hawaiʻi, although there is no fossil evidence that the species ever had a distribution beyond these two islands.
Basra Reed-Warbler - It is found in aquatic vegetation in or around shallow, fresh or brackish water, still or flowing, mainly in dense reedbeds. It is found in thickets and bushland when migrating or wintering.
Acrocephalus luscinius - The species is approximately 17 cm long, and is greyish olive-brown above with a pale-yellow underside. It inhabits wetlands, thickets and the margins of forests. The female is slightly smaller than the male. Both sexes have a long bill compared to other reed warbler species.
Acrocephalus rodericanus - The Rodrigues Warbler is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found only on Rodrigues, which belongs to Mauritius. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, and plantations . It is threatened by habitat loss.
Pitcairn Reed Warbler - It is endemic to Pitcairn Island in the southern Pacific. Locally known as the "Sparrow" , it used to be common throughout the island, where it is the only land bird. It was formerly classified as a Vulnerable species by the IUCN due to its small range.
New Caledonian Owlet-Nightjar - This bird is endemic to New Caledonia’s Melaleuca savanna and humid forests. Other members of its genus are highly territorial and nest in holes in trees. These birds also forage by sitting on a branch and attacking small animals. It is unknown if these habits apply to the New Caledonian Owlet-nightjar, but this species is larger and has longer legs than the others, so it may be more terrestrial.
Bruijn's Brush-turkey - An Indonesian endemic, Bruijn's Brush-turkey occurs in mountain forests on Waigeo Island of West Papua.
Elegant Sunbird - An Indonesian endemic, the Elegant Sunbird is distributed to the island of Sangihe, north of Sulawesi. It is found and locally common in the forests and plantations near Mount Sahendaruman in southern Sangihe.
Tricoloured Blackbird - This highly social and gregarious bird forms the largest colonies of any North American landbird, with a single breeding colony often consisting of tens of thousands of birds.
Yellow-shouldered blackbird - The nominate form of the Yellow-shouldered Blackbird was first described from Puerto Rico and Vieques in 1862 by Philip Sclater as Icterus xanthomus. The species is closely related to, and possibly derived from, the Red-winged Blackbird . The Tawny-shouldered Blackbird , a species from Cuba and Haiti, is morphologically intermediate between A. xanthomus and A. humeralis. Until recently, some authors considered A. xanthomus as a subspecies of A. humeralis. The 1983 American Ornithologists' Union edition considered A. xanthomus, together with A. humeralis, a superspecies. The main physical difference between A. xanthomus and A. humeralis resides in their bills, with A. humerali's being broader toward the base. The recognized subspecies A. x. monensis, or Mona Yellow-shouldered Blackbird, was described by Barnes in 1945 from the islands of Mona and Monito.
Purple-backed Sunbeam - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland and plantations. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Aglaiocercus berlepschi - The male is 22 centimetres in length with the elongated outer tail-feathers accounting for 14-15 centimetres. Its plumage is mostly irridescent green. The throat is blue and the outer tail-feathers are violet, becoming blue towards the tips. The female is 9.5-11 centimetres long. The tail is shorter than that of the male but still fairly long and slightly forked. Females have a blue crown and white throat, breast and belly.
Raso Lark - The Raso Lark is restricted to one small island in the Cape Verde group, although historically it is believed to have ranged over two other islands, Branco and Sao Vicente Island; all three of these islands were joined in the last Ice Age. Branco island itself has no permanent water and has never been inhabited by people, a fact that has probably saved the lark from extinction until now.
Cholo Alethe - The Thyolo Alethe is a species of bird in the Turdidae family. It is found in Malawi and Mozambique. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Sakalava Rail - Its natural habitats are rivers, swamps, freshwater lakes, and freshwater marshes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Carrizal Seedeater - This bird lived on Isla Carrizal in the Caura River, in northern Venezuela.
Chestnut-bellied Hummingbird - The Chestnut-Bellied Hummingbird is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found only in Colombia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Amazilia luciae - The Honduran Emerald, Amazilia luciae, is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found only in Honduras. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss, and deforestation. The species is locally common in arid thorn forest and scrub in the upper Rio Aguan valley, Department of Yoro. It was discovered by Lawrence in 1867.
Imperial Amazon - The Imperial Amazon is endemic to mountain forests of the Caribbean island nation of Dominica in the Lesser Antilles, Its diet consists mainly of fruits and seeds. It nests in hollow trees.
Yellow-headed Amazon - This species is part of the Amazona ochrocephala complex, which also includes the Yellow-naped Amazon . This complex, "a taxonomic headache",
Red-browed parrot - It is threatened by habitat loss and capture for the wild parrot trade.
Vinaceous-breasted parrot - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and plantations. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Green-cheeked Amazon - Their appearance is generally green with the most notable features being a bright red forehead and crown, dark blue streaks behind the eyes, and light green cheeks.
Puerto rican parrot - The Puerto Rican Amazon reaches sexual maturity between three and four years of age. It reproduces once a year and is a cavity nester. Once the female lays eggs she will remain in the nest and continuously incubate them until hatching. The chicks are fed by both parents and will fledge 60 to 65 days after hatching. This parrot's diet is varied and consists of flowers, fruits, leaves, bark and nectar obtained from the forest canopy.
Ash-breasted Tit-Tyrant - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Madagascar Teal - This duck is 40 to 45 cm in length, and is predominately warm brown all over with conspicuous black scalloping, heaviest on flanks and breast. It has a black speculum, and its bill is pinkish gray and slightly upturned.
Brown Teal - The Brown Teal or New Zealand Teal, is a species of dabbling duck of the genus Anas. The Māori name for it is Pāteke. It was considered to be conspecific with the flightless Auckland Island and Campbell Island Teals in Anas aucklandica; the name "Brown Teal" was applied to that entire taxon. The Brown Teal has since been split, recognizing that the insular A. aucklandica and A. nesiotis are good species. In international use, the name Brown Teal is still more common than New Zealand Teal for this bird.
Laysan teal - Named by Lionel Walter Rothschild in 1892, the Laysan Duck is named after Laysan island, one of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. It is a member of the mallard clade of dabbling ducks, and is a highly behaviorally and genetically unusual species. Recent evidence suggests they evolved from an east Asian, southern hemisphere ancestor of mallards, not from stray migratory Mallards as had been reported in the past.
Meller's Duck - Meller's Duck is a species of the dabbling duck genus Anas. It is endemic to eastern Madagascar. Although a population was established on Mauritius in the mid-18th century, this is on the verge of extinction due to habitat loss and competition by feral domestic ducks. The species name of this species is after the botanist Charles James Meller, and its generic name is from the Ancient Greek for a duck.
Campbell island teal - The Campbell Island Teal is a small, flightless, nocturnal species of dabbling duck of the genus Anas endemic to the Campbell Island group of New Zealand. It is sometimes considered conspecific with the Brown Teal. The plumage is similar to that of the Auckland Teal, dark sepia with the head and back tinged with green iridescence, and a chestnut breast on the male, with the female dark brown all over. Its natural habitat is tussock grassland dominated by Poa tussock grass, ferns and megaherbs. The species also uses the burrows and pathways of petrel species that nest on the islands. They are apparently territorial in the wild, and probably feed on amphipods and insects.
Koloa - The former range of the Hawaiian Duck included all of the main Hawaiian islands except the island of Lānaʻi. Its range is now restricted to the island of Kauaʻi. The Hawaiian Duck was extirpated on all other islands, but was subsequently reestablished on Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi, and Maui through release of captive-reared birds. However, all the Hawaiian Ducks in the reestablished populations have bred with feral Mallard ducks and have produced hybrid offspring that is fully fertile ; consequently, "pure" Hawaiian Ducks are still only found on Kauaʻi.
Glaucous Macaw - The Glaucous Macaw is 70 centimetres long. It is mostly pale turquoise-blue with a large greyish head. The term glaucous describes its colouration. It has a long tail and a large bill. It has a yellow, bare eye-ring and half-moon-shaped lappets bordering the mandible.
Hyacinth Macaw - The Hyacinth Macaw is 100 cm long and 1.5–2 kg in weight. The wingspan is 120–140 cm . It is almost entirely blue and has black under the wings. It has a large black beak with bright yellow along the sides of the lower part of the beak and also yellow circling its eyes. The female and male are nearly indistinguishable, although the female is typically a bit more slender.
Lear - The Lear's Macaw is 70–75 cm long. The body, tail, and wings are dark blue and the head is a slightly paler shade. It has an area of bare pale-yellow skin adjacent to the base of its beak, and orange-yellow eyerings. It has a large blackish beak and dark grey feet. The general appearance of the Lear's Macaw is similar to the larger Hyacinth macaw and the smaller Glaucous Macaw.
Sulu Hornbill - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Araripe manakin - As typical of most manakins, males and females have a strong sexual dimorphism in the colors of the plumage. As in the Helmeted Manakin, it is a relatively large and long-tailed manakin, with a total length of c. 14.5 centimetres. The strikingly patterned males have a predominantely white plumage. With the exception of the white wing coverts, the wings are black as the tail. From the frontal tuft, over the crown, down to the middle back runs a carmine red patch. The iris is red. The females are mainly olive green and have pale green upperparts. They have a reduced olive green frontal tuft.
Apalharpactes reinwardtii - The Javan Trogon is a species of bird in the Trogonidae family. The species was once lumped together with the Sumatran Trogon in a single species, the Blue-tailed Trogon, but differences in size, weight and plumage have led to the two being split. These two species were once themselves lumped with the rest of the Asian trogons in the genus Harpactes, but have been split into their own genus due to differences in plumage.
Kungwe Apalis - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Apalis flavigularis - The Yellow-throated Apalis is a species of bird in the Cisticolidae family. It is endemic to Malawi.
Teita Apalis - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Masafuera Rayadito - Masafuera Rayaditos travel in pairs while feeding on arthropods; feeding occurs in the wood understory and occasionally on the ground in the leaf-litter. Nesting occurs at high altitudes , in small natural crevices in rocks.
Aplonis brunneicapillus - The White-eyed Starling is a species of starling in the Sturnidae family. It is found in Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical swamps. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Pohnpei Starling - The Pohnpei Starling reached a size of 19 cm. It was generally dark with sooty brown upperparts. The head was darker and exhibit a black forehead and black lores. The wings, the rump, the uppertail coverts and the tail were paler and were showing a stronger brown colouring at the head. The underparts were washed olive brown. The bill and the feet were black. The iris was brown. The juveniles were looking similar to the adults except for the upperparts of their plumage which had exhibit a paler brown. Its call consists of a bell-like shrill see-ay.
Brown Kiwi - Until 2000, the Brown Kiwi was thought to include the Rowi and the Tokoeka, in addition to the North Island Brown Kiwi. However using genetic codes from each of the above it was determined that the Tokoeka was a separate species, it took the Apteryx australis name , leaving the Brown Kiwi with its current Apteryx mantelli name. Soon after, in 1998, more genetic tests were done with the rowi and it was determined that it was a separate species . In 2004 an injured bird was found with streaked white around the head and identified by Massey University. The white feathering is likely due to a rarely seen genetic variation sometimes described as a partial albino. Few documented cases exist with only a painting of one found in Otorohanga in the 18th century and a specimen in the Canterbury Museum. The injured bird recovered and was introduced into a breeding programme.
Great Green Macaw - The Great Green Macaw, Ara ambiguus, also known as Buffon's Macaw or the Great Military Macaw, is a Central and South American parrot found in Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia and Ecuador. Two allopatric subspecies are recognized, the nominate subspecies is found in Central America to northern Colombia, while A. a. guayaquilensis is found in western Ecuador and possibly south-western Colombia.
Wagler's Macaw - The Blue-throated Macaw lives in the savanna of the Beni Department of Bolivia, nesting in "Islas" of palm trees that dot the level plains. It is not a forest dwelling bird.
Red-fronted Macaw - The Red-fronted Macaw is 55–60 cm long. It is mostly green, and has a red forehead, a red patch over the ears and bright red to orange edged under wing coverts. It has an area of pinkish skin around the eyes extending to the beak. It has red at the bend of wings and blue primary wing feathers.
Aratinga brevipes - The Socorro Parakeet is a species of parrot in the Psittacidae family. It is endemic to Socorro Island in the Revillagigedo Islands, Mexico. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss due to feral sheep and predation by feral cats.
Sun Parakeet - On average, Sun Parakeets weigh approximately 110 g and are around 30 cm long. They are sexually monomorphic.
Boulton's Hill Partridge - Recent work on the species in Laojunshan Nature Reserve found that the species occurred in secondary broadleaf forest but not in settlements, coniferous plantations or farmland. The same study found that birds typically occurred between 1400 and 1800m above sea level in the reserve, and mostly on gently sloping ground close to water sources.
Imperial Heron - The White-bellied Heron is found in the wetlands of tropical and subtropical forests in northeast India and Myanmar. It is also spotted in Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan's sub tropical areas. The major threats the heron faces are hunting and habitat destruction .
Malagasy Pond Heron - The Malagasy Pond Heron , also known as the Madagascar Pond Heron, is a species of heron in the Ardeidae family. It is found in Angola, Bahamas, Burundi, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mayotte, Mozambique, Rwanda, Réunion, Seychelles, Somalia, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, rivers, freshwater lakes, freshwater marshes, estuarine waters, and arable land.
Great Indian Bustard - The Great Indian Bustard or Indian Bustard is a bustard found in India and the adjoining regions of Pakistan. A large bird with a horizontal body and long bare legs giving it an ostrich like appearance, this bird is among the heaviest of the flying birds. Once common on the dry plains of the Indian Subcontinent, it was considered excellent sport by hunters. Less than a thousand survive today and the species is threatened by hunting and loss of its habitat, large expanses of dry grassland and scrub. These birds are often found associated in the same habitat as blackbuck.
Artisornis moreaui - The Long-billed Tailorbird is a songbird of the family Cisticolidae, formerly part of the "Old World warbler" assemblage.
Atlapetes blancae - The Antioquia Brush-finch is a poorly known species from the Emberizidae family. It was scientifically described in 2007 on basis of three museum specimens from Antioquia, Colombia, which were previously labelled as Slaty Brush-finch . The specific epithet blancae refers to the whitish underparts of the new species, while also commemorating the Colombian lepidopterologist Blanca Huertas, the wife of ornithologist Thomas Donegan . All three museum skins were collected in the 20th century, but only one label has a date, which is given with 1971. Subsequent fieldwork in Antioquia has failed to find this species again. The species description has been approved by the South American Classification Committee. It has been recommended for a critically endangered status.
Olive-headed Brush Finch - This species has a yellow to dark olive head. The throat, chin, malar streak, lores, eye-ring, and ear patch are bright yellow in any case. The rest of the plumage is yellow with dark olive upperparts, wing and tail. The variation in the head color is not well explained, but it is likely that the olive-headed individuals are females and/or immature birds.
Black-goggled Brush-Finch - The Black-spectacled Brush-finch is a species of bird in the Emberizidae family. It is endemic to Peru.
Pale-headed Brush Finch - It is threatened by habitat loss and the nest-parasitic Shiny Cowbird. Most of its tiny known range, estimated at only 1 km² by BirdLife International, is within the Yunguilla reserve, which, following the rediscovery of this species in 1998, was set up by the Jocotoco Foundation. Following intensive management, including the removal of cowbirds, the population of the Pale-headed Brush-finch is currently increasing. Further increase, however, may be limited by a lack of suitable habitat.
Baer's Pochard - It is similar in size and stance to its close relative the Ferruginous Duck , although the coloration of the drakes is entirely different. Baer's Pochard males are similar to those of the Greater Scaup , but have a dark back and upper flanks; the white lower flanks and belly are conspicuous. The females of Baer's Pochard and the Ferruginous Duck are quite similar, but that holds true for the females of almost all Aythya species.
Madagascar Pochard - Based on the accounts written by Webb and Delacour's in the 1920s and 1930s it seemed that the bird was still relatively common at Lake Alaotra .
Gold-ringed Tanager - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Grey-headed Warbler - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Sao Tome Ibis - The São Tomé Ibis's measurements include: wings 248 mm; bill 73 mm; tarsus 52 mm; and tail 95 mm. The head is dull olive with black surrounding the eyes and base of the bill. The wing-coverts and mantle are slightly bronzed.
Australasian Bittern - It is a large bittern, patterned and streaked brown, buff and black, with a pale throat. It is a cryptic and partly nocturnal species that inhabits densely vegetated wetlands. It feeds on aquatic animals such as frogs, eels and freshwater crustaceans. It is a solitary nester on the ground in dense wetland vegetation on trampled reeds and other plants. It has a distinctive booming voice and may be heard more often than seen.
Kittlitz's murrelet - The common name of this species commemorates the German zoologist Heinrich von Kittlitz, who first collected this species.
Marbled murrelet - The Marbled Murrelet is a small , chunky auk with a slender black bill. It has pointed wings and plumage that varies by season. The non-breeding plumage is typically white underneath with a black crown, nape, wings and back. The bird closely resembles its closest relative, the Long-billed Murrelet. In fact, these species were considered conspecific up until 1998. They are virtually identical. In breeding plumage, both have a brown mottled body and face. The Long-billed has a pale white throat, lacking in the Marbled. In winter plumage, the Marbled Murrelet has a white neck collar, absent in Long-billed. The Marbled Murrelet is shorter billed and slightly smaller than the Long-billed Murrelet.
Grauer's Scrub-Warbler - The Grauer's Scrub-warbler is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, and Uganda. Its natural habitats are freshwater lakes and freshwater marshes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Red-breasted Goose - The Red-breasted Goose is a goose of the genus Branta. It is sometimes separated in Rufibrenta but appears close enough to the Brent Goose to make this unnecessary, despite its distinct appearance.
Grey-cheeked Parakeet - The Grey-cheeked Parakeet was described and named by John Latham in 1801.
Ridgway's Hawk - The Ridgway's Hawk's original breeding range included Haiti and the Dominican Republic and some of the adjacent isles and keys. As of 2006, its only known population resides within Los Haitises National Park in the northeastern Dominican Republic, which is mostly covered by wet limestone forest.
Golden-backed Mountain Tanager - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Red-vented Cockatoo - The plumage is all white with red undertail coverts tipped white, yellowish undertail and pale yellow underwings. It is 12.2 inches long and has an 8.6 inches wingspan.
Lesser Sulphur-crested Cockatoo - The Yellow-crested Cockatoo is found in wooded and cultivated areas of Timor-Leste and Indonesia's islands of Bali, Timor, Sulawesi and Lesser Sunda Islands. It is easily confused with the larger
White-winged Duck - However, mtDNA cytochrome b and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 sequence analysis and the biogeographical pattern of distribution indicate that the anatomical similarity to the Muscovy Duck is deceiving. Thus, this species might more appropriately be placed in a monotypic genus, as Asarcornis scutulata, which appears to be unrelated to the Muscovy Duck but closer to the diving ducks.
Kokako - The North Island Kōkako, Callaeas cinerea wilsoni has blue wattles .The South Island Kōkako, Callaeas cinerea cinerea, by contrast has largely orange wattles, with only a small patch of blue at the base .
White-tailed Black-Cockatoo - The binomial commemorates the French explorer Nicolas Baudin.
Slender-billed Black-Cockatoo - Carnaby's Black-Cockatoo is recognised as Endangered under the federal Environment Protection and Conservation Act 1999,
Kinglet Calyptura - It is endemic to Atlantic forest in south-eastern Brazil. For a long time this species was feared to be extinct, as it went unrecorded during the 20th century until two birds were observed in Serra dos Órgãos on several days in October 1996. Since these sighting, there have not been any confirmed records, although at least one recent - but unconfirmed - record exists from near Ubatuba. Consequently, it is considered critically endangered by BirdLife International.
Mangrove Finch - As its name suggests, the Mangrove Finch lives in the mangroves of the Galápagos Islands. The mangrove finch feeds upon the various insects, larvae, spiders, and vegetable matter found in the mangroves. It closely resembles the far commoner Woodpecker Finch, but is not known to utilize tools.
Charles Insectivorous Tree Finch - This species is only found on Floreana Island at elevations above 250m in moist highland forest habitat. Prime breeding habitat is dominated by Scalesia pedunculata trees. It is threatened by habitat loss which has occurred through clearance for agriculture and introduced predators such as rats, mice, cats, and the Smooth-billed Ani. The diurnal Galapagos Short-eared Owl is its only remaining natural predator. The introduced parasite Philornis downsi is a significant threat to the survival of this species. Parasitic larvae of this fly live in the nest material and feed on the blood and body tissues of nestlings. P. downsi causes high nestling mortality in the Medium Tree-finch.
Imperial woodpecker - The male had a red-sided crest, but was otherwise black, apart from the inner primaries, which were white-tipped, white secondaries, and a white scapular stripe which unlike in the Ivory-billed Woodpecker did not extend on the neck. The female was similar but the crest was all black and recurved at the top. It was once widespread and, until the early 1950s, not uncommon throughout the Sierra Madre Occidental of Mexico, from western Sonora and Chihuahua southwards to Jalisco and Michoacan.
Ivory-billed Woodpecker - Picus principalis Linnaeus, 1758
Santa Marta Sabrewing - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes, subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland, and plantations . It is threatened by habitat loss.
White-mantled Barbet - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, pastureland, and plantations. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Puerto rican nightjar - It was described from bones found in cave deposits and a single specimen taken in 1888. The species was considered extinct, the specimen being the last remnant of a "prehistoric" bird. However, it was found to be still extant in 1961; it had been overlooked due to its secretive habits and because its habitat was not surveyed.
Prigogene's Nightjar - It is appears to be a forest species, but nothing is known of its habits or breeding, although it is likely to nest on bare ground like its relatives. It is assumed to be a nocturnal insectivore like other nightjars.
Red Siskin - Some hope has been given to this highly endangered species by the discovery in 2003 of a population of several thousand birds in southern Guyana, 1000 km from any previously known colony. Otherwise the world population is believed to be between 600-6000 pairs.
Warsangli Linnet - The Warsangli Linnet is a species of finch in the Fringillidae family. It is found only in Somalia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Sumatran Ground-Cuckoo - An Indonesian endemic, the Sumatran Ground Cuckoo is distributed to rainforests of southern Sumatra. Before it was rediscovered and photographed in 1997 by Andjar Rafiastanto, this elusive species was known only from eight specimens.
Whistling Warbler - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Caatinga Woodpecker - Normally, it has been considered a subspecies of the Rufous-headed Woodpecker , but an evaluation by the South American Classification Committee in 2003 resulted in it being recognized as a distinct species. This was based on the differences in habitat, size and plumage, combined with the large distance between the ranges of the two species.
Gunnison Sage-grouse - Gunnison Sage-Grouse are notable for their elaborate courtship rituals. Each spring males congregate on leks and perform a "strutting display". Groups of females observe these displays and select the most attractive males to mate with. Only a few males do most of the breeding. Males perform on leks for several hours in the early morning and evening during the spring months. Leks are generally open areas adjacent to dense sagebrush stands, and the same lek may be used by grouse for decades.
Steere's Coucal - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Esmeraldas Woodstar - The Esmeraldas Woodstar, Colibri De Berlepsch, ColibrÍ De Esmeraldas, or Estrellita EsmeraldeÑA is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found only in Ecuador.
New Zealand Dotterel - New Zealand Dotterels are shorebirds and are usually found on sandy beaches and sandspits or feeding on tidal estuaries.
St. Helena Plover - The bird was first mentioned in 1638, and is the national bird of Saint Helena, featured on the island's coat of arms.
Red-throated Lorikeet - This bird occurs on the islands of Viti Levu, Vanua Levu, Taveuni and Ovalau. Ten specimens were collected in 1923, but it was last recorded in 1993, although it may also have been seen on Mt. Tomaniivi on Viti Levu in 2001. A search of Viti Levu in 2001-2 failed to find any birds, as did a second series of surveys in 2003.
New Caledonian Lorikeet - The New Caledonian Lorikeet Charmosyna diadema is a possibly extinct lorikeet endemic to the Melanesian island of New Caledonia.
Blue-fronted Lorikeet - It is only known from seven specimens, collected before 1930 in hill forest between 850–1000 m. More recent sightings are not well authenticated, so its remaining range is uncertain.
Prigogine's Greenbul - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Chondrohierax wilsonii - This species is classified as critically endangered by BirdLife International. The current population is estimated 50 to 250 mature birds. After a last confirmed sighting in 2001 and an unconfirmed sighting in 2004 Cuban ornithologist Nils Navarro Pacheco took a photograph of one individual in 2009.
Oriental white stork - At one time, the Oriental Stork could be found in Japan, China, Korea and Russia. It is now extinct in Japan and Korean peninsula. However, in May 2007 a hatchling was reported in Japan for the first time in 40 years in the wild. It was offspring of two storks who were bred in captivity. After breeding, the storks migrate to eastern China in September and return in March.
Storm's Stork - This little known species is found in undisturbed forest and freshwater habitats in Sumatra, Mentawai Islands, Borneo and peninsular Malaysia. One of its strongholds are in southeast Sumatra, with remaining populations confined to Kalimantan and Brunei. While in peninsular Malaysia only one very small population and scatter individuals left. The world population of the Storm's Stork is less than 500 individuals.
Royal Cinclodes - This bird has a population of less than 250, and is classified as Critically Endangered. It is confined to tiny, humid patches of Polylepis woodland and montane scrub, and the major threat to tis survival is the use of fire and heavy grazing which restrict the regeneration of Polylepis.
White-bellied Cinclodes - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Reunion Harrier - It is about 50 cm long; the female is around 3–15% larger than the male. The male has a blackish head and back with white streaks. The underparts, underwings and rump are white and the tail is grey. The wings are grey and black with a white leading edge. Females and immatures are dark brown with a white rump and barred tail.
Aberdare Mountain Cisticola - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Apolinar's Wren - This bird is small, with brown head, gray patches around the eyes, streaked dark back and reddish tail.
Purple-winged Ground-Dove - The Purple-winged Ground Dove is a critically endangered species of dove, native to Atlantic forest, mainly near bamboo, in south-eastern Brazil, far eastern Paraguay, and northern-eastern Argentina . It is threatened by habitat loss and possibly the wild bird trade. There are few recent sightings and the total population is estimated to number less than 250 individuals.
Golden White-eye - The Golden White-eye is a species of bird in the white-eye family Zosteropidae. It is the only species within the genus Cleptornis. The Golden White-eye was once considered to be a honeyeater in the family Meliphagidae and although it is now known to be a white-eye, its position within that family is still uncertain. The species is restricted to the islands of Saipan and Aguijan in the Northern Mariana Islands, where it is sympatric and competes with the related Bridled White-eye. The Golden White-eye has golden plumage and a pale eye-ring. It feeds on insects, fruit, and nectar and forages in pairs or small family groups. The bird is monogamous and lays two eggs in a small cup nest.
Recurvebill Bushbird - Working in parallel, Colombian ornithology student Oscar Laverde refound Bushbirds in Norte de Santander, Colombia in July 2005. The birds were subsequently studied in detail by Laverde, F. Gary Stiles and ornithology students of the Natural Sciences Institute of the National University of Colombia. Their findings are published in issue No. 5 of Ornitología Colombiana .
Clytorhynchus sanctaecrucis - It is found in Fiji and Solomon Islands. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss. The Santa Cruz Shrikebill is little-known, rarely seen, and it was once speculated it might be extinct; it does still exist however.
Coccyzus rufigularis - The Bay-breasted Cuckoo is a species of cuckoo that is endemic to the island of Hispaniola in the Caribbean. It has a length of roughly 45–50 centimetres . C. rufigularis possesses a curved bill, a grey throat and breast, a black tail, and white-tipped retrices.
Dusky Starfrontlet - This bird was erroneously listed as a species of Least Concern in the IUCN Red List for many years. Actually, it seems close to extinction, and its status was thus corrected to Critically Endangered in the 2007 Red List issue.
Guam Swiftlet - The Guam Swiftlet is a species of swift in the Apodidae family. It is found in Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, and the United States. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and pastureland.
Colluricincla sanghirensis - The Sangihe Shrike-thrush is a species of bird in the Colluricinclidae family. It is endemic to Indonesia.
Silvery Wood-Pigeon - The Silvery Pigeon , also known as Silvery Wood-pigeon or Grey Wood-pigeon is a species of pigeon. It was thought to be extinct but photographs taken in 2008 near Masokut Island might represent this species.
Laurel Pigeon - A rare resident breeder in the mountain laurisilva and Canary pine forests, the Laurel Pigeon builds a stick nest in a tree. There it lays one white egg.
Blue-eyed Ground Dove - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Cone-billed Tanager - It was described on the basis of a single male specimen collected in Mato Grosso, Brazil, in 1938. No other individuals were collected or seen and some feared the bird had become extinct, while others speculated that it possibly only was an aberrant Black-and-white Tanager . In 2003, it was rediscovered by D. Buzzetti in gallery woodland and Cerrado in the Emas National Park, only to be independently rediscovered at the same locality in 2004 by B. A. Carlos.
Black Shama - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, and plantations.It has been sighted in several locations all across the island, the most important sites being the Central Cebu Protected Landscape, the forests of Alcoy and Argao, and the shrublands of Casili, Consolacion. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Seychelles Magpie Robin - This species of magpie robin is approximately 25 cm in length. It has a glossy coal-black plumage with a white-colored bar on each wings. It is considered a long-lived species whose lifespan is over 15 years of age. Its habitat is woodlands, plantations and the vicinity of gardens. Their range on the island of Fregate was limited by the area of open ground with leaf litter.
Reunion Cuckooshrike - The Reunion Cuckoo-shrike is a small arboreal bird. The plumage is dimorphic between the sexes. The male is grey coloured with a darker back and lighter underside; the face is darker and has the impression of a mask. The female is quite different, being dark brown above and striped underneath with a white eye-line. The call of the species is a clear whistled tui tui tui, from which is derived its local Réunion Creole/French name, tuit-tuit.
Flores Crow - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mariana Crow - The Mariana Crow is a small black crow with a bluish-black gloss on its tail, and a greenish-black gloss on its back, underparts, head, and wings. In general, females are smaller than males. An adult weighs about 9 ounces and is about 15 inches long.
Banggai Crow - The Banggai Crow, Corvus unicolor, is a member of the crow family from Banggai in Indonesia. It is listed as critically endangered by IUCN and was even feared extinct, but was finally rediscovered during surveys on Peleng Island by Indonesian ornithologist Mochamad Indrawan in 2007 and 2008.
Banded Cotinga - Its natural habitat is tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Inquisivi Spinetail - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and plantations . It is threatened by habitat loss.
Blue-billed Curassow - It is found only in Colombia; areas of its range in the south and east are bordered by the Magdalena River. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Red-billed curassow - The Red-knobbed Curassow or Red-billed Curassow, Crax blumenbachii, is an endangered species of Cracid that is endemic to lowland Atlantic Forest in the states of Espírito Santo, Bahia and Minas Gerais in southeastern Brazil. Its population is decreasing As suggested by its common name, the male has a largely red bill, but this is lacking in the female.
Gray-crowned Crocias - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Forbes's Blackbird - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, and plantations . It is threatened by habitat loss.
Zapata Rail - The Zapata Rail was discovered by Spanish zoologist Fermín Zanón Cervera in March 1927 in the Zapata Swamp near Santo Tomás, in the southern Matanzas province of Cuba. The swamp holds one other bird found nowhere else, the Zapata Wren, and also gives its name to the Zapata Sparrow. Due to ongoing habitat loss in its limited range, its small population size, and predation by introduced mammals and catfish, the Zapata Rail is evaluated as endangered on the IUCN Red List of threatened species. Tourism and climate change may pose threats in the future.
Spix's Macaw - Spix's Macaw is 55–57 cm long. It is various shades of blue, including a pale blue head, pale blue underparts, and vivid blue upperparts, wings and tail. Its voice is a repeated short grating. Also makes squawking noises.
Norfolk Parakeet - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and plantations. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Forbes's Parakeet - The Chatham Parakeet native habitat is in brushy forest on the Chatham Islands and Pitt Islands. Due to hunting, the introduction of domestic cats and habitat destruction, the parakeets had diminished to 100 individuals on the lesser of the Mangere islands in 1938, but because of reforestation on Mangere Island Numbers have grown to hundreds. The parakeets are still confined to the two Mangere Islands.
Orange-fronted Parakeet - For many years the Malherbe's Parakeet was considered a subspecies or as color variant They live in Nothofagus forest on the South Island of New Zealand, although they may have had a wider range of habitats prior to the arrival of humans. They have been threatened by the felling of old growth forest, which provided the older trees which they nested in, by overgrazing of the low bushes which they fed in, and by predation by introduced rats, stoats and cats.
Rueck's Niltava - The Rueck's Blue-flycatcher is endemic to the island of Sumatra, Indonesia. It is known only from four specimens. Two specimens, an immature and adult male were last recorded and collected around 1917-1918 in secondary lowland forests in Medan area of North Sumatra province by the Dutch collector, August van Heijst. The other two skins are of doubtful origin.
Matinan Niltava - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Dasycrotapha speciosa - The Flame-templed Babbler is a species of bird of the Timaliidae family, in the monotypic genus Dasycrotapha. It is endemic to the Philippines.
Eastern Bristlebird - It is endemic to Australia. Its natural habitats are temperate forests, temperate shrubland, and temperate grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Dendrocopos noguchii - The Okinawa Woodpecker , is a woodpecker endemic to the island of Okinawa in Japan. It is the only member of the genus Sapheopipo.
Golden-cheeked wood warbler - Golden-cheeked warblers nest in ashe juniper and live oak trees in ravines and canyons. They use bark and spider webs to build their nests. Females lay three to four eggs. Warblers eat insects and spiders and the adult warbler can reach a length of 4.5 inches. They winter in southern Mexico , Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua.
Cebu Flowerpecker - The Cebu Flowerpecker is a critically endangered breeding bird. It was feared to have become extinct early in the 20th century after the clearance of most of the island's forests, but was rediscovered in 1992 in a small patch of limestone forest in the Central Cebu Protected Landscape and has since been found at three other sites, namely, the Nug-as forest of Alcoy, Mount Lantoy of Argao and the forests of Dalaguete. Other possible sites for this species are in Malabuyoc. The current population is estimated to be between 85 and 105.
Comoro Drongo - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, pastureland, and plantations. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mayotte Drongo - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, and plantations . It is threatened by habitat loss.
Tooth-billed Pigeon - The only extant member in the monotypic genus Didunculus, the Tooth-billed Pigeon is confined to undisturbed forests of Samoa in the Pacific. It feeds almost exclusively on the fruits of Dysoxylum, a tree in the mahogany family.
Chestnut-bellied Flower-piercer - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Venezuelan Flowerpiercer - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Amsterdam Island Albatross - The Amsterdam Albatross or Amsterdam Island Albatross,
Tristan Albatross - The Tristan Albatross, Diomedea dabbenena, is a large seabird from the albatross family. One of the great albatrosses of the genus Diomedea, it was only widely recognised as a full species in 1998.
Northern Royal Albatross - The Northern Royal Albatross or Toroa,
Marquesan Imperial-Pigeon - Formerly classified by the IUCN as a critically endangered species with an estimated population of less than 150 adult birds.
Mindoro Imperial-Pigeon - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Bahia Tapaculo - The Bahia Tapaculo is a species of bird in the Rhinocryptidae family. It is endemic to lowland Atlantic forests in Bahia, Brazil. Until recently, it was feared extinct, but has since been rediscovered and is now known from the municipalities of Ilhéus, Maraú, Taperoá, Valença. It remains highly threatened by habitat loss and is consequently considered critically endangered by BirdLife International and IUCN. Together with the closely related White-breasted Tapaculo, it was formerly placed in the genus Scytalopus, but these two species are now known to be closer to the bristlefronts .
Eleothreptus candicans - The White-winged Nightjar is a species of nightjar in the Caprimulgidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, and Paraguay. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Red-and-blue Lory - The Red-and-blue lory, Eos histrio is an arboreal parrot endemic to Indonesia. It is classed as endangered, as it is hunted for the pet trade and has lost much of its habitat due to habitat destruction. The Red-and-blue Lory is now confined to the Talaud Islands off northern Sulawesi, Indonesia. Further populations, some apparently introduced, disappeared during the 20th century from Sangihe, Siau and Tagulandang. The population is estimated at only 5,000-10,000 birds. It is thought to be in rapid decline.
Turquoise-throated Puffleg - Based on the few known specimens, it has a total length of 10-11 centimetres. The plumage of the male is predominantly green with a turquoise tinted throat. Both sexes have violet blue untertail-coverts and a straight black bill. The upperparts and the main part of the underparts are shimmering golden green in the males. Rump and uppertail-coverts are bluish green. The throat is pale violet blue and the forked tail is bluish black. The female lacks the throat patches, its plumage is less light and the belly more golden. Like all pufflegs it has striking leg-puffs of dense white downy feather tufts.
Eriocnemis isabellae - The Gorgeted Puffleg measures between 90 and 100 millimeters in length. The name of the species is in relation to the gorget on the throat of the male, a patch of iridescent green and brilliant blue feathers, and from the puffs of white feathers at the thighs.
Colourful Puffleg - In 2005, Swarovski donated funds which allowed the American Bird Conservancy and Fundación ProAves to create a reserve for this species.
Black-breasted Puffleg - The Black-breasted Puffleg is an average sized
Erythrura gouldiae - The Gouldian Finch, Erythrura gouldiae , also known as the Lady Gouldian Finch, Gould's Finch or the Rainbow Finch, is a colorful passerine bird endemic to Australia. There is strong evidence of a continuing decline, even at the best-known site near Katherine in the Northern Territory. Large numbers are bred in captivity, particularly in Australia. In the state of South Australia, National Parks & Wildlife Department permit returns in the late 1990s showed that over 13,000 Gouldian Finches were being kept by aviculturists. If extrapolated to an Australia-wide figure this would result in a total of over 100,000 birds. In 1992, it was classified as "Endangered in the wild" under IUCN's criteria C2ai. This was due to the fact that the viable population size was estimated to be less than 2,500 mature individuals, no permanent subpopulation was known to contain more than 250 mature individuals, and that a continuing decline was observed in the number of mature individuals. It is currently subject to a conserva
Eudyptes moseleyi - A study published in 2009 showed that the world population of the Northern Rockhopper had declined by 90% since the 1950s. For this reason, the Northern Rockhopper Penguin is classified as an Endangered species.
Big-crested Penguin - This is a medium-small, yellow-crested, black-and-white penguin, at 50-70 cm and weighing 2.7-5.2 kg . It has bluish-black to jet black upperparts and white underparts, and a broad, bright yellow eyebrow-stripe which extends over the eye to form a short, erect crest.
Chilean Woodstar - The Chilean Woodstar is a small bird in the hummingbird family, Trochilidae. It is restricted to northernmost Chile with reports from southern Peru. Its natural habitats are dry shrubland and rural gardens. It is threatened by habitat loss and is classed as an endangered species. It is usually classified in its own genus Eulidia but is sometimes placed with the Purple-collared Woodstar in the genus Myrtis.
Ouvea Parakeet - The Ouvea Parakeet or Uvea Parakeet, is a species of parrot in the Psittacidae family. It is endemic to the island of Uvea in the Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia. The species was once considered conspecific with the Horned Parakeet of Grande Terre, but they have now been split into two species.
Oaxaca Hummingbird - Like White-tailed Hummingbird, it is sometimes considered a subspecies of the more widespread Stripe-tailed Hummingbird.
Eurochelidon sirintarae - The adult White-eyed River Martin is a medium-sized swallow, with mainly glossy greenish-black plumage, a white rump, and a tail which has two elongated slender central tail feathers with long narrow racquets at the tips. It has a white eye and a broad, bright greenish-yellow bill. The sexes are similar, but the juvenile lacks the tail racquets and is generally browner than the adult. Little is known of the behaviour or breeding habitat of this species, although like other swallows it feeds on insects caught in flight, and roosts in reedbeds in winter.
Spoon-billed Sandpiper - The most distinctive feature of this species is its spatulate bill. The breeding adult bird is 14–16 cm in length, and has a red-brown head, neck and breast with dark brown streaks. It has blackish upperparts with buff and pale rufous fringing. Non-breeding adults lack the reddish colouration, but have pale brownish-grey upperparts with whitish fringing to the wing-coverts. The underparts are white and the legs are black.
Rowley's Flycatcher - The Caerulean Paradise-flycatcher is endemic to the island of Sangihe, off north Sulawesi in Indonesia. Previously known only from a single specimen collected in 1873, this rare bird was rediscovered in October 1998 around forested valleys of Mount Sahendaruman in southern Sangihe. Its diet consists mainly of insects and other small invertebrates.
Madagascar Serpent Eagle - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Saker - The Saker Falcon is a very large falcon. This species breeds from eastern Europe eastwards across Asia to Manchuria. It is mainly migratory except in the southernmost parts of its range, wintering in Ethiopia, the Arabian peninsula, northern Pakistan and western China. During the end of the last ice age–oxygen isotope stages 3-2, some 40,000 to 10,000 years ago–it also occurred in Poland .
Zapata Wren - Measuring about 16 centimetres in length, it is brown overall, though striped with black and with grayish underparts. Its tail is long.
Lompobattang Flycatcher - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Black-hooded Antwren - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist shrubland and plantations . It is threatened by habitat loss.
Formicivora littoralis - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Cameroun Mountain Francolin - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Djibouti Francolin - The Djibouti Francolin, Francolinus ochropectus, is one of over forty species of francolins, a group of birds in the Phasianidae family. It is critically endangered and found only in Djibouti, a nation in eastern Africa. This species is grayish-brown overall with white stripes and streaks on its underparts which become finer towards the upperparts. It has black markings on the head and a gray crown and has a short tail. It is 35 cm in length, and weighs 940 g .
Christmas Frigatebird - It is estimated that the population of this species will decline by 80 percent in the next 30 years due to predation of the young by the introduced yellow crazy ant , which has devastated the wildlife of the island, and has also killed 10–20 million Christmas Island red crabs.
Negros Bleeding-heart - This species has an extremely small, severely fragmented population. Continuing rates of forest loss on the two islands where it occurs suggest that it will continue to decline, thereby qualifying it as critically endangered.
Sulu Bleeding-heart - This species is known from two specimens collected in the Sulu Archipelago in 1891, and has not been recorded with certainty since. There were local reports of the bird from several islands in 1995. Any remaining population is likely to be tiny, and for these reasons it is treated as Critically Endangered.
Samoan Moorhen - The Samoan Wood Rail , also known as Samoan Moorhen, is a nearly flightless rail endemic to the Samoan island of Savai'i, and probably extinct. As it has evolved adaptations for a more terrestrial lifestyle and at least partly nocturnal habits, it is probably better placed in a distinct genus, Pareudiastes , but this issue has not yet been thoroughly researched. It was known as puna'e to the native Samoans; this was said to relate to the bird's habit of making a jumping dash into cover when startled from its resting place.
San Cristobal Moorhen - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
New Caledonian Rail - This cryptic rail is only known from seventeen specimens taken between 1860 and 1890 on New Caledonia. This bird is supposed to live in evergreen forests and seems to have moved higher up on the island to escape introduced predators. Its diet consists of invertebrates, including earthworms.
Okinawa Rail - The Okinawa Rail is a species of bird in the rail family, Rallidae. It is endemic to Okinawa Island in Japan where it is known as the Yanbaru Kuina . Its existence was only confirmed in 1978 and it was formally described in 1981 although unidentified rails had been recorded on the island since at least 1973 and local stories of a bird known as the agachi kumira may refer to this species.
Lord Howe Woodhen - Woodhens mate for life and are usually encountered in pairs. They are territorial and will appear from the forest's understory to investigate the source of any unusual noise. A mated pair will defend an area of approximately 3 hectares, with offspring being expelled from this area once grown. The population of birds is thus restricted by the amount of available territory.
Nilgiri White-breasted Laughing Thrush - The Rufous-breasted, Black-chinned or Nilgiri Laughingthrush, Trochalopteron cachinnans, is a species of Laughingthrush endemic to Peninsular India.
Garrulax courtoisi - The Blue-crowned Laughingthrush or Courtois's Laughingbird is a Chinese species of bird in the Timaliidae family. Until recently, this critically endangered species was generally treated as a subspecies of the Yellow-throated Laughingthrush, but that species has a pale grey crown.
Collared Laughingthrush - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Peninsular Yellowthroat - It is closely related to Common Yellowthroat, Altamira Yellowthroat and Bahama Yellowthroat, with which it forms a superspecies, and was formerly considered conspecific.
Black-polled Yellowthroat - Its natural habitats are freshwater lakes and freshwater marshes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Tuxtla Quail-Dove - Its natural habitats are lowland and montane tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hermit Ibis - The Northern Bald Ibis was once widespread across the Middle East, northern Africa and southern Europe, with a fossil record dating back at least 1.8 million years. It disappeared from Europe over 300 years ago, and is now considered critically endangered. There are believed to be about 500 wild birds remaining in southern Morocco, and fewer than 10 in Syria, where it was rediscovered in 2002. To combat these ebbing numbers, recent reintroduction programs have been instituted internationally, with a semi-wild breeding colony in Turkey, as well as sites in Austria, Spain and northern Morocco.
Pernambuco Pygmy-owl - This owl is classified as critically endangered by BirdLife International. It is assumed to have a tiny and declining population within an extremely small known range. The population is estimated at less than fifty adult birds.
Hook-billed hummingbird - The Hook-Billed Hermit is an endangered species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found in humid forest in eastern Brazil, with recent records from the states of Espírito Santo and Bahia only. It resembles the far commoner Rufous-breasted Hermit, but has a straighter bill and lacks rufous in the tail. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Japanese Night Heron - The Japanese Night Heron prefers dense, damp forest, in both its breeding and winter ranges. Common until the 1970s, this species is threatened by deforestation in its summer and winter ranges. Other documented threats include the introduction of the Siberian Weasel in its breeding range. The current population is estimated at less than 1,000 mature individuals.
White-eared Night-Heron - The White-eared Night Heron is a species of heron in the Ardeidae family. It is found in China and Vietnam. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and rivers. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Grallaria chthonia - The Táchira Antpitta reaches a length of 17 cm. Its upperparts are brownish. Crown and nape are coloured grey. The mantle has black barrings. Throat and ear coverts are brown. It is further characterised by a white malar stripe. The lower belly is whitish, the flanks and the breast have grey barrings.
Brown-banded Antpitta - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and plantations. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Grallaria ridgelyi - The new species is a large ground antbird with a striking head pattern showing tufts of white plumes beneath the eyes. It has a song similar to the hooting of the Rufous-banded Owl.
Ochre-fronted Antpitta - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Whooping crane - Adult whooping cranes are white with a red crown and a long, dark, pointed bill. Immature whooping cranes are pale brown. While in flight, their long necks are kept straight and their long dark legs trail behind. Adult whooping cranes' black wing tips are visible during flight.
Japanese crane - The Red-crowned Crane , also called the Japanese Crane or Manchurian Crane, is a large crane and is the second rarest crane in the world .
Great White Crane - This species breeds in arctic Russia in Yakutia and western Siberia. It is a long distance migrant. The eastern population winters on the Yangtze River and Lake Poyang in China, the central population at Keoladeo National Park, India , and the western population in Fereydoon Kenar in Iran. It breeds and winters in wetlands, where it feeds on the shoots, roots and tubers of aquatic plants.
Golden parakeet - Its plumage is mostly bright yellow, hence its common name, but it also possesses green remiges.
Yellow Cardinal - It is found in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Its natural habitats are dry savanna, temperate shrubland, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, and temperate grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Talaud rail - Its natural habitats are rivers and swamps. It is threatened by habitat loss.
California condor - Species-level:
Crow Honeyeater - This bird is endemic to New Caledonia and lives in humid forests on hills. It is relatively inconspicuous, and lives either in pairs or alone. It forages for invertebrates and nectar in the canopy and midstorey.
Mao - It is a large honeyeater, 28-31 cm long. The plumage is dark, varying from blackish on the head and breast to greenish. There is a greenish mark under the eye. The bill is long, curved and black and the legs and feet are also black.
Indian White-backed Vulture - The Indian White-rumped Vulture is an Old World vulture in the family Accipitridae. It is closely related to the European Griffon Vulture . At one time it was believed to be closer to the White-backed Vulture of Africa and was known as the Oriental White-backed Vulture. The species was present in large numbers, in Southern and Southeastern Asia until the 1990s.
Indian Vulture - The Indian Vulture is an Old World vulture and is closely related to the Griffon Vulture, G. fulvus. It breeds mainly on crags in the hills of Sind in Pakistan, central and peninsular India. The birds in the northern part of its range once considered a subspecies are now considered a separate species, the Slender-billed Vulture Gyps tenuirostris. These were lumped together under the name Long-billed Vulture.
Long-billed Vulture - The Slender-billed Vulture is a recently recognized species of Old World vulture. For some time, it was categorized with its relative, the Indian Vulture, under the name of "Long-billed Vulture". However, these two species have non-overlapping distribution ranges and can be immediately told apart by trained observers, even at considerable distances. The Indian Vulture is found only to the south of the Ganges and breeds on cliffs while the Slender-billed Vulture is found along the Sub-Himalayan regions and into Southeast Asia and nests in trees.
Black-cheeked Ant-Tanager - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Chatham Oystercatcher - This species is endangered, and has a current population of 310 to 325 birds . The main threat is from introduced predators.
Madagascar Fish Eagle - Its closest relative is the African Fish-eagle, Haliaeetus vocifer. Together, they form a distinct species pair lineage of sea-eagles, which separated soon after the divergence of the genus; they retain the ancestral dark beak, talon, and eye, but unlike other Haliaeetus species, they always have at least partially white tails, even while juvenile. As in other sea-eagle species pairs, one species has a tan head, while the other has a white one.
Indigo-winged Parrot - The Fuertes's Parrot , also known as Indigo-winged Parrot, is a critically endangered parrot which has a highly restricted range on the west slope of the Central Andes of Colombia.
Royal Sunangel - The Royal Sunangel is a species of hummingbird. It is endemic to subtropical elfin forests and shrub in the Andes of northern Peru and adjacent south-eastern Ecuador. It is endangered due to habitat loss. It is strongly sexually dichromatic, and while females resemble other female sunangels, males are unique with their iridescent dark blue plumage.
Masked Finfoot - The Masked Finfoot is an underwater specialist, with a long neck, and a striking sharp beak and lobed feet which are green. The male and female both have a black mask and eyebrow that contrasts with a white eyering and lateral cervical stripe. The rest of the neck is grey, the breast is pale and the back, wings and tail are rich brown. The males have an all black chin while the females have a white chin.
Hemignathus lucidus - Males have yellow underparts and head. The upperparts are duller, darker and greenish. Females are overall duller, with most of the underparts whitish. The lores, eye-ring and long decurved bill are blackish. It is 5.5 inches long.
Akiapolaau - The ʻAkiapōlāʻau is a species of finch in the Hawaiian honeycreeper subfamily, Drepanididae, that is endemic to the island of Hawaii. Its natural habitats are dry and montane moist forests, and the only bird species on the island to occupy the woodpecker niche.
Kaempfer's Tody-Tyrant - It is threatened by habitat loss.
Henicorhina negreti - The bird is found on the Munchique Massif in the western Andes in the Chocó Endemic Bird Area, Colombia.
Ash-throated Antwren - The first specimens were collected in northern Peru in 1983.
Forest Owlet - The Forest Owlet is an owl that is endemic to the forests of central India. This species belongs to the typical owls family, Strigidae. After it was described in 1873 and last seen in the wild in 1884, it was considered extinct It is found in a very small number of localities and the populations are low and the forests of central India are threatened and shrinking, making the species critically endangered.
Sidamo Lark - Its natural habitats are dry savanna and subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss and unlike previously believed its population is rapidly declining. Listed as Vulnerable since 2000 on the IUCN Red List, it has been uplisted to Endangered in 2007,
New Zealand Stilt - Despite of 20 years of intensive protection, this species remains the rarest wading bird in the world. and the current population is estimated at 22 adult birds. There is a captive population of some 25 adults, annual release in the wild of captive-bred birds and predator control has probably prevented it from becoming extinct in the wild. During the breeding season it is restricted to the upper Waitaki Valley in the South Island. Small numbers overwinter in the North Island.
Bengal Florican - The Bengal Florican or Bengal Bustard, Houbaropsis bengalensis, is a very rare bustard species from tropical southern Asia. It is the only member of the genus Houbaropsis. This threatened species is now almost extinct; probably less than 1,000 and perhaps as few as 500 adult birds are still alive.
Grand Comoro Flycatcher - The upperparts are grey-brown while the underparts are pale with dark streaks. It has a dark crown with pale streaks and the bill and feet are yellow-orange. The bird is 14 cm long. It is often silent but has a soft trilling call.
Hyliota usambara - The Usambara Hyliota is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found only in Tanzania.
Scissor-tailed Hummingbird - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Blue Duck - This 54 cm long species is an endemic resident breeder in New Zealand, nesting in hollow logs, small caves and other sheltered spots. It is a rare duck, holding territories on fast flowing mountain rivers.It is a powerful swimmer even in strong currents, but is reluctant to fly. It is difficult to find, but not particularly wary when located.
Montserrat Oriole - It inhabits a small area on the island of Montserrat in the Lesser Antilles of the West Indies, and is the national bird of this British territory. It is threatened by habitat loss, and has been classified by BirdLife International as Critically Endangered, with a current estimated population of between 200 and 800. Much of its habitat was destroyed by deforestation, Hurricane Hugo and the volcanic activity between 1995 and 1997.
Streak-breasted Bulbul - The Streak-breasted Bulbul or Mottle-breasted Bulbul is a songbird species in the bulbul family .
Blakiston's Fish-Owl - It feeds on a variety of aquatic prey, including fish and amphibians, but also takes small mammals and birds to the size of hazel grouse . It also takes carrion, as evidenced by fish owls in Russia being trapped in snares set for furbearing mammals, which use raw meat as bait.
Gabela Bushshrike - The Gabela Bushshrike or Amboim Bushshrike is a bird in the Malaconotidae family. It is a reclusive and enigmatic bird, and it is not quite resolved whether it should better be considered a distinct species or a well-marked subspecies of Luehder's Bush-shrike . It is endemic to Angola.
Orange-breasted Bushshrike - The Orange-breasted Bush-shrike or Braun's Bush-shrike is a species of bird in the Malaconotidae family. It is endemic to Angola.
Newton's Fiscal - The species lives on the island of São Tomé and is usually found under closed canopy. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Black-billed Gull - The Black-billed Gull is a species of gull in the Laridae family. It is endemic to New Zealand. As is the case with many gulls, it has traditionally been placed in the genus Larus, but is now considered to be the genus Chroicocephalus.
Rusty-flanked Crake - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland, freshwater lakes, freshwater marshes, and water storage areas. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Swift Parrot - The Swift Parrot is endangered with only about 1000 pairs remaining in the wild, and its population is declining.
Sapphire-bellied Hummingbird - The Sapphire-Bellied Hummingbird is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It has bright plumage, with blue undersides and green uppersides and black wings. The forked tail is blue-black. It is found only in Colombia. The species is endemic to the Atlantic coasts. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical mangrove forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
White-browed Tit-Spinetail - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
White-collared Kite - The White-collared Kite is 50 cm in length. The adult has a grey head with white hindneck, black upperparts, white underparts, and a grey tail with a very broad, black subterminal band and whitish tip. It is very similar to the more southerly distributed Grey-headed Kite and was often merged into it as a subspecies.
Greater Adjutant - The Greater Adjutant is a large wading bird in the stork family Ciconiidae. It formerly bred in southern Asia, mainly in India, extending east to Borneo, but is now restricted to two small breeding populations; mainly in Assam and Cambodia. Populations disperse widely after the breeding season. This large stork has a massive wedge-shaped bill, a bare head and a distinctive bare neck pouch. During the day, they soar in thermals along with vultures with whom they share the habit of scavenging. Although mainly feeding on carrion and offal, they will sometimes prey on vertebrates. They are named for the stiff "military" gait when walking on the ground. Large numbers once lived across Asia but have declined to the point of being endangered. The total population in 2008 was estimated at around a thousand. In the 19th Century, they were especially common in the city of Calcutta, where they were referred to as the "Calcutta Adjutant", valued for their service as scavengers and used in the logo of the city municipal c
Tolima Dove - It is endemic to Colombia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and pastureland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Grenada Dove - The Grenada Dove is characterised by a white throat; face and forehead pale pink shading to dull brown on crown and nape; upperparts olive brown; underwing chestnut; neck and upper breast pink-buff fading to white on lower breast, belly and undertail coverts.
Semper's Warbler - The bird is about 14.5 centimetres in length. The plumage of the adults is dark gray at the upperparts and greyish white at the underparts. The immatures are brownish-grey above and have buffish underparts, and the long legs are pale yellow. It lives in the undergrowth of montane and elfin forests. The call consists of tuck-tick-tick-tuck noises. Nothing is known about its ecology but it is probably a ground-nesting bird.
Bali Myna - Placed in the monotypic genus Leucopsar, it appears to be most closely related to Sturnia and the Brahminy Starling which is currently placed in Sturnus but will probably soon be split therefrom as Sturnus as presently delimited is highly paraphyletic . The specific name commemorates the British ornithologist Lord Rothschild.
Gray-backed Hawk - The Grey-backed Hawk is a species of bird of prey in the Accipitridae family. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Chestnut-capped piha - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Marvelous Spatuletail - A Peruvian endemic, this species is found in the forest edge of the Río Utcubamba region. It was first reported in 1835 by the bird collector Andrew Matthews for George Loddiges. The Marvellous Spatuletail is unique among birds, for it has just four feathers in its tail. Its most remarkable feature is the male's two long racquet-shaped outer tail feathers that cross each other and end in large violet-blue discs or "spatules". He can move them independently.
Edward's pheasant - This species has two varieties. The nominate form L. e. edwardsi has a white crest and upper tail, whereas the northern form L. e. hatinhensis is found with a variable number of white retrices. This difference in the two forms may be due to inbreeding of a restricted, fragmented population there, and has also been seen in captive, inbred L. e. edwardsi. The northern form is sometimes given a separate species status by some authors, Vietnamese Pheasant, Lophura hatinhensis .
Vietnamese pheasant - The Vietnamese Pheasant is a species of gallopheasant. Discovered in 1964, it is endemic to central Vietnam. Its range concentrates around Ke Go Nature Reserve in Ha Tinh Province.
Wallace - This is an arboreal parrot. The male is predominantly green, with a red bill, a red spot on the throat, orange legs and dark red nape, bright red rump and uppertail-coverts. The female has the red on the throat reduced or absent.
Hispaniolan crossbill - It was formerly regarded as conspecific with the Two-barred Crossbill , from which it is now assumed it evolved.
Palila - The palila has a yellow head and breast, with white to light gray plumage ventrally, medium gray plumage dorsally, and olive-green wings and tail. The wings and the tails are greenish. The bird also has a heavy dark bill with swollen sides, a brown iris, and dark feet with yellowish soles. The palila is one of the largest living Hawaiian honeycreepers, measuring around 6–7.5 inches .
Akekee - The ʻAkekeʻe is a greenish-yellow bird with a black mask around the eye and a bluish bill, unlike the ʻĀkepa, which is usually red, canary-yellow or orange, without black, and have horn-colored bills. Their bill-tips are crossed over, though not bent as in distantly-related Fringillidae the crossbills . The ʻAkekeʻe's call is softer than its relatives.
Akepa - All 'Akepa have an unusual cross-bill. When closed, the upper bill tip overlaps either to the right or left of the lower bill tip; this small overlap cannot be seen in the field. When opening the bill, as in prying open leaf buds on native Ohia trees to extract arthropod prey, the bill swings sideways, and this is easily seen in the hand. The Akepa uses this bill in a similar fashion to the North American Crossbills . This species is usually found above 1,100 meters up to 2,200 meters above sea level. 'Akepa are often found in small groups, including displays by multiple males, and in mixed-species flocks during the non-breeding season.
Maleo megapode - The only member of the monotypic genus Macrocephalon, the Maleo is endemic to the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. It is found in the tropical lowland and hill forests, but nests in the open sandy areas, volcanic soils or beaches that are heated by the sun or geothermal energy for incubation.
Macronyx sharpei - It is 16-17 cm long, with upperparts heavily marked with buff and rufous streaks, yellow underparts, and white outertail feathers in flight.
Pulitzer's Longbill - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Rufous-throated White-eye - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Black-cap Bush Shrike - Wildlife Conservation Society of Tanzania
Malaconotus kupeensis - Telophorus kupeensis
Ibadan Malimbe - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Manorina melanotis - Black-eared Miners are listed as endangered on the Australian Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Their conservation status also varies from state to state within Australia. For example:
Yellow-eyed Penguin - The species breeds around the South Island of New Zealand, as well as Stewart, Auckland and Campbell Islands. Colonies on the Otago Peninsula are a popular tourist venue, where visitors may closely observe penguins from hides, trenches or tunnels.
La perouse's megapode - The Micronesian Megapode is a stocky medium-sized bird that is mostly dark brownish-black in appearance. Its head is paler than its body, and it has a pale grey crest, a yellow bill, and large dull-yellow legs and feet. Its habitat is thick forest and it is omnivorous, eating a large variety of foods from the forest floor.
Niaufoou Scrubfowl - Its natural habitat is tropical moist lowland forests. On Niuafo'ou it is most common on the central caldera. The Tongan Megapode, like all megapodes, does not incubate its eggs by sitting on them; instead the species buries them in warm volcanic sands and soil and allows them to develop. On islands in former parts of its range without volcanoes it presumably created mounds of rotting vegetation and laid the eggs there.
Black-faced hill-robin - The Poʻouli was not discovered until 1973 by students from the University of Hawaiʻi, who found the bird on the north-eastern slopes of Haleakala on the island of Maui. It was found during the Hana Rainforest Project at an altitude of 1,980 metres above sea level. The Poʻouli was the first species of Hawaiian Honeycreeper to be discovered since 1923. It is dissimilar to other Hawaiian birds. Evidence based on DNA suggests it belongs to an ancient lineage of honeycreepers
St. Lucia Black Finch - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, and plantations . It is threatened by habitat loss.
Brazilian Merganser - This merganser is a dark, slender duck with a shiny dark-green hood with a long crest, which is usually shorter and more worn-looking in females. Upperparts are dark grey while the breast is light grey, getting paler toward the whitish belly, and a white wing patch is particularly noticeable in flight. It has a long thin jagged black bill with red feet and legs. Although females are smaller with a shorter bill and crest, both sexes are alike in color. The slender ducks range in size from 49 centimeters to 56 centimeters as an adult. Young Brazilian Mergansers are mainly black with white throat and breast.
Chinese Merganser - It is a striking sea duck with a thin red bill and a scaled dark pattern on the flanks and rump. Both sexes have a crest of wispy elongated feathers, reaching almost to the shoulders in adult males and being fairly short in females and immatures. The adult male has a black head and neck, white breast and underparts, and blackish mantle and wings, except for the white innerwings.
Stresemann's Bristlefront - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Truk Monarch - The Chuuk Monarch is a large monarch flycatcher, around 20 cm long. The plumage of this species is sexually dimorphic, with the male having almost entirely white plumage with a black face and throat and the female having entirely black plumage. The large bill is pale blue.
Perija Metaltail - The Perijá Metaltail is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is endemic to paramo and elfin forest at high altitudes of the Perijá Mountains in Colombia and Venezuela. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Socorro Thrasher - The Socorro Mockingbird, Mimus graysoni, is an endangered mockingbird endemic to Socorro Island in the Revillagigedo Islands. The specific name commemorates the American ornithologist Andrew Jackson Grayson.
San Cristobal Mockingbird - The San Cristobal Mockingbird or Chatham Mockingbird is a species of bird in the Mimidae family. It is endemic to San Cristóbal Island in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.
Floreana mockingbird - It is endemic to Floreana, one of the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador; at present it only occurs on offshore islets however. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Ash's Lark - In the case of some lark species, as with Ash's Lark it is hard to describe definitively without having to compare its characters with those of some of its close relatives. It is insufficient to say only that it is a small lark that has greyish-brown upperparts with paler edging to its mantle feathers; and having buff-colored underbelly|underparts with brownish streaks, but a paler belly and vent; and with a light crest, and buff eyebrow-stripes.
Yellowhead - The Yellowhead and the Whitehead have sympatric distributions as, conversely, the latter is found only on the North island and several small islands surrounding it. Although abundant in the 1800s, particularly in beech forests from Nelson and the Marlborough Sounds to Southland and Stewart Island/Rakiura, they declined dramatically in the early 1900s due to the introduction of ship rats and mustelids. Today they have vanished from nearly 75% of their former range. In New Zealand, the Mohua has the status of a protected threatened endemic species. Conservation efforts are being made to ensure its survival and Mohua populations have been established on several predator-free offshore islands, such as Breaksea Island in Fiordland and Ulva Island.
Black-chinned Monarch - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Biak Monarch - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
White-tipped Monarch - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and subtropical or tropical moist shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mees' Monarch - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Monticola erythronotus - The Amber Mountain Rock-thrush is a songbird in the family Muscicapidae, formerly placed in the Turdidae together with the other chats. It was for long included in the Forest Rock-thrush as a subspecies, but it is usually considered a separate species nowadays.
Myadestes lanaiensis - Its song consists of a complex melody of flute-like notes, liquid warbles, and gurgling whistles. The call is a catlike rasp," with an alternate high pitched note similar to a police whistle. This bird occurs in densely vegetated gulches, frequenting the understory where it often perches motionless in a hunched posture. Like other native Hawaiian thrushes, it quivers its wings and feeds primarily on fruit and insects.
Puaiohi - The plumage is mostly nondescript, with slaty-brown upperparts and a light gray breast and belly below. Birds have a black bill and pinkish feet. A white eye ring is also fairly prominent and helps distinguish this bird from the other Hawaiian Thrushes. Both males and females are highly similar in appearance. Juveniles show a pattern transitioning from a spotted whitish-buff above to a scalloped gray-brown below.
Rufous Flycatcher - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Yellow-faced Redstart - The Paria Whitestart , also known as the Yellow-faced Whitestart, is a species of bird in the Parulidae family. It is endemic to the Paria Peninsula in Venezuela, where it occurs in humid forests, especially near the edge. It is sometimes known by the less accurate names Paria Redstart or Yellow-faced Redstart. It is threatened by on-going habitat loss within its tiny range.
Santa Marta Bush-Tyrant - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Sri lanka whistling thrush - Sri Lanka Whisting Thrush is found in the highlands of Sri Lanka in jungle or other dense forest near water. It is omnivorous, eating a wide range of insects, frogs, earthworms and berries. It lays one or two eggs in a neat cup-shaped nest in a bush or on a ledge near water.
Scalloped Antbird - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Rio de Janeiro Antwren - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Myrmotherula snowi - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Loveridge's Sunbird - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Cherry-throated Tanager - The Cherry-throated Tanager, Nemosia rourei, is a medium-sized passerine bird. This critically endangered tanager is an endemic to handful of localities in the Atlantic Forest in Espírito Santo, Brazil, though the possibility that it occurs in adjacent parts of Minas Gerais and Rio de Janeiro cannot be discounted. It has a striking, essentially black-white-red plumage; a photo is online in the abstract of Bauer et al. 1998.
Banded Ground Cuckoo - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Orange-bellied parakeet - The Orange-bellied Parrot breeds in Tasmania and winters in coastal grasslands on southern mainland Australia. With a population fewer than 75 wild birds, it is regarded as a critically endangered species.
Egyptian Vulture - There are three recognised subspecies of the Egyptian Vulture:
Neospiza concolor - Until recently this bird was known only from three nineteenth century specimens. It was rediscovered in 1991. The current population is estimated at less than 50. The main threat is habitat destruction.
Nesoenas mayeri - An adult pigeon is about 32 cm from beak to tail and 350 gram in weight. Pink pigeons have pale pink plumage on their head, shoulders and underside, along with pink feet and pink beak. They have dark brown wings, and a broad, reddish-brown tail. They have dark brown eyes surrounded by a ring of red skin.
Jamaican Blackbird - The Jamaican Blackbird is a small icterid with all black plumage. It has a short tail that is often frayed . It is strictly arboreal and has a wheezing call. Pairs occupy large territories in a variety of wet montane forest types, including elfin and mist forests, that have substantial epiphytes and mosses on the trees.
Kaka - The New Zealand Kaka was described by German naturalist Johann Friedrich Gmelin in 1788. There are two subspecies, the North Island Kākā, Nestor meridionalis septentrionalis, and the South Island Kākā, N. m. meridionalis. The name Kākā is a Māori language word meaning "parrot".
Crested Ibis - Their habitat is usually mainlands and wetlands. They make their nests at the tops of trees on hills usually overlooking their habitat. Crested Ibises usually eat frogs, small fishes, and small animals.
Eskimo Curlew - The Eskimo Curlew is one of eight species of curlew, and is classed with them in the genus Numenius. It was formerly placed in the separate genus Mesoscolopax. Numenius is classed in the family Scolopacidae. Other species in that family include woodcocks, phalaropes, snipes, and sandpipers. Scolopacidae is a Charadriiform lineage. >:)
Slender-billed curlew - This species has occurred as a vagrant in western Europe, the Canary Islands, the Azores, Oman, Canada and Japan. The only time it was seen in North America was in Crescent Beach, Ontario, Canada in 1925.
New zealand storm-petrel - Outside the breeding season it is pelagic, remaining at sea, and this, together with its remote breeding sites, makes it a difficult bird to observe.
Ashy Storm Petrel - This is a small, uniformly sooty-brown storm petrel with a forked tail, closely resembling the Black Storm-petrel, however it is smaller and has a more fluttering style of flight, with the upstroke only becoming horizontal to the body before beginning the downstroke .
Guadalupe Storm-Petrel - The Guadalupe Storm-petrel is a small seabird of the storm-petrel family Hydrobatidae. It is apparently extinct.
Gorgeted Wood Quail - Its natural habit are humid subtropical and temperate forests that mave mainly oak and laurel trees. The bird has only been sited between the altitudes of 1,750-2,050 m, however it is believed that this tiny quail may have an elevational range of 1,500-2,500 m. It is probably dependent on primary forest for a part of its life-cycle, yet it has also been sited in degraded habitats and secondary forest.
Yellow-eared Parrot - The Yellow-eared Parrot nests and lives among wax palms in a few areas of Western and Central Cordillera of Colombia; were it inhabits cloud forests about 1800 – 3000 meters above sea level. It nests in the hollow trunks of the palms, usually 25-30 meters over the floor level. It also occurred very locally in the Western Cordillera of Ecuador where wax palm grows. Their numbers had been greatly reduced, and only 81 individuals were recorded in the Colombian census of 1999. Their populations have been impacted by hunting and habitat destruction, particularly the harvesting of wax palm, which was traditionally cut down and used each year on Palm Sunday. There has been no confirmed records of this parrot from Ecuador since the mid-90s.
Himalayan Quail - The Himalayan Quail is a medium-sized quail belonging to the pheasant family. It was last reported in 1876 and is feared extinct. This species was known from only 2 locations in the western Himalayas in Uttarakhand, north-west India. The last verifiable record was in 1876.
Hawaii creeper - The Hawaiʻi Creeper is similar to treecreepers in that it is able to climb up and down trees. It uses its short, sharp beak to probe bark for insects residing underneath. If available, it will sip nectar from koa or ʻōhiʻa lehua .
Horned guan - The only member in monotypic genus Oreophasis, the Horned Guan is distributed in humid mountain forests of southeast Mexico- and Guatemala of Central America. It is found in altitude up to 3,350 metres. Its diet consists mainly of fruits, green leaves and invertebrates. The female usually lays up to two eggs.
Isabella Oriole - The Isabela Oriole is an endemic species of the Oriole family found on Luzon, the Philippines. The bird that was presumed extinct for many years until it rediscovery in December 1993 near Diffun, Quirino, and in Mansarong, Baggao, Cagayan in September 1994. Additional sightings were made in 2004 near San Mariano, Isabela.
Papuan Scops-Owl - The Biak Scops Owl is an owl endemic to the twin islands of Biak-Supiori in Geelvink Bay, Papua , Indonesia. It is classified as Endangered due to its very small range and destruction of its habitat.
Anjouan Scops-Owl - This species is a part of the larger grouping of owls known as typical owls, Strigidae, which contains most species of owl. The other grouping is the barn owls, Tytonidae.
Seychelles Scops-Owl - It reaches a length between 19 and 22 cm. The wings are about 17 cm. Its plumage is rufous brown and exhibits black shaft streaks. The underparts and the facial disc are rufous. The long grey legs are unfeathered. The eyes are large and golden yellow. The ear tufts are very small. Its call which sounds like a rasping "whaugh" with various "tok tok" notes can be heard from a far distance and in particular in the darkness. Its diet consists of geckos, tree frogs and insects .
Morden's owlet - The Sokoke Scops Owl, Otus ireneae, is an owl found in Kenya and Tanzania. The greatest population of this species of owl is in the Cynometra-Manilkara forest, which is less than one-third of the Sokoke forest. It is also found in the Afzelia-Cynometra forest. The Sokoke Scops Owl can grow up to 16 to 18 cm and can weigh up to 50 grams and is the smallest scops owl of the Otus genus. It is insectivorous and can be either grey or rufous-brown.
Moheli scops-owl - This species is a part of the larger grouping of owls known as typical owls, Strigidae, which contains most species of owl. The other grouping is the barn owls, Tytonidae.
Grand Comoro Scops-Owl - This species is a part of the larger grouping of owls known as typical owls, Strigidae, which contains most species of owl. The other grouping is the barn owls, Tytonidae.
Otus siaoensis - The Siau Scops Owl, Otus siaoensis is a critically endangered owl and may be extinct. They live on the island of Siau, north of Sulawesi, Indonesia and are forest dwellers. The species is only known from a single holotype from 1866 although there have been some local reports in recent years. Even so their population is being devastated by loss of habitat due to excessive logging of the forest on the island and there would be very few if any individuals left.
Serendib Scops-owl - It is the first new bird to be discovered in Sri Lanka since 1868, when the Sri Lanka Whistling Thrush Myophonus blighi was discovered. It is also the 24th endemic bird species for Sri Lanka.
White-headed Duck - Adult males have a grey and reddish body, a blue bill and a largely white head with a black cap and neck. Adult females have a grey-brown body with a white face and a darker bill, cap and a cheek stripe.
Slaty Becard - The Slaty Becard is a species of bird in the Tityridae family. It has traditionally been placed in Cotingidae or Tyrannidae, but evidence strongly suggest it is better placed in Tityridae, where now placed by SACC. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Crested honeycreeper - The ʻākohekohe is a nectarivore that feeds on the flowers of ʻōhiʻa lehua high up in the canopy. It is an aggressive bird and will drive away competing nectarivores, such as the related ʻapapane and ʻiʻiwi. When ʻōhiʻa lehua blossoms are limited, it will eat insects, fruit, and nectar from other plants. The ʻakohekohe will forage in the understory if necessary, where food plants include ʻākala .
Abbott's Booby - Abbott’s Booby is a large endangered seabird of the gannet family, Sulidae. It belongs to the monotypical genus Papasula. Found normally only on and around Christmas Island , it is the sole living member of the genus Papasula. This species is named for William Louis Abbott who discovered it on Assumption Island in 1892.
Forty-spotted Pardalote - About 9 to 10 cm long, it is similar to the much more common Spotted Pardalote, , but has a dull greenish-brown back and head, compared to the more colorful plumage of the former, with which it shares range, and there is no brow line. Rump is olive, under-tail dull yellow. Chest white with light yellow tints. Wings are black with white tips, appearing as many discrete dots when the wings are folded. No seasonal variation in plumage; juveniles slightly less colorful than adults.
Paroreomyza maculata - The bird is critically endangered and may be extinct because of disease , introduced and invasive plants and wildlife, and habitat loss. The last confirmed record occurred in 1985, though unconfirmed reports are still filed.
Helmeted Curassow - The Northern Helmeted Curassow, Pauxi pauxi is a large terrestrial black curassow with a small head, large bluish grey casque on forehead, red bill, white-tipped tail feathers, greenish glossed mantle and breast feathers, and white below. Both sexes are similar. The male, at 3.6 kg , is larger than the female, at 2.6 kg . Some rare rufous morph female has a black barred and reddish brown plumage. For some time, it also contained the Southern Helmeted Curassow taxa as subspecies and was simply known as the Helmeted Curassow. Nowadays its southern congener is considered a distinct species P. unicornis.
Horned Curassow - The Southern Helmeted Curassow is a species of bird in the Cracidae family. It is found in Bolivia and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Green Peafowl - The sexes of Green Peafowl are quite similar in appearance, especially in the field. During most of the year, when the males have no visible trains, it is quite difficult to distinguish the sexes. Both sexes have tall pointed crests, and are long-legged, heavy-winged and long-tailed in silhouette. Seen from a distance, they are generally dark coloured birds with pale vermillion or buff coloured primaries which are quite visible in their peculiar flight which has been described as a true flapping flight with little gliding that one associates with Galliform birds.
Plains-wanderer - This is a quail-like ground bird, measuring 15–19 cm. The adult male is light brown above, with fawn-white underparts with black crescents. The adult female has a distinctive white-spotted black collar. They are poor flyers, preferring to run when startled. Females lay four eggs, which the male then incubates.
Peruvian Diving Petrel - The Peruvian diving petrel has become locally extinct on many of its former colonies and nests nowadays only on a few offshore islands. A total population of 12 216 breeding pairs was estimated for San Gallán and La Vieja Islands in Peru, with some small additional breeding colonies reported for Corcovado Island in Peru, as well as Pan de Azucar Island, Choros islands, Grande and Pajaros islands in Chile. They breed year round, laying a single egg in a burrow dug into guano.
White-winged guan - This species survives in Lambayeque, Cajamarca and Piura, north-west Peru. These are large birds, 70 cm in length, and similar in general appearance to turkeys, with thin necks and small heads.
Baudo Guan - The Baudo Guan, Penelope ortoni, is a species of bird from the family Cracidae. It is restricted to humid forests in the west Andean foothills of western Colombia and north-western Ecuador. It is highly sensitive to hunting and habitat destruction, with large sections of the Chocó already having disappeared entirely. Consequently, it is considered to be endangered by BirdLife International and IUCN.
Cauca Guan - This species occurs on the west slopes of the West and Central Andes of Colombia. These are large birds, 76 cm in length, and similar in general appearance to turkeys, with thin necks and small heads. They are forest birds, and the nest is built in a tree.
Mindoro Hornbill - The Mindoro Tarictic Hornbill , sometimes shortened to Mindoro Hornbill, is a species of hornbill in the Bucerotidae family. It is endemic to forests on Mindoro in the Philippines. As is the case with all Philippine tarictic hornbills, it has been considered a subspecies of P. panini. It is the only tarictic hornbill where both sexes are creamy-white and black. The sexes are very similar, and primarily differ in the colour of the ocular ring .
Tarictic Hornbill - The adults show sexual dimorphism. The male has a creamy-white head and neck, a white upper chest, a reddish brown lower chest and uppertail-coverts, and a creamy-white buff tail with a broad black tip. The bill and casque are blackish; the former with yellowish ridges. The bare ocular skin is pinkish-white. The tail and bill of the female resemble that of the male, but otherwise the plumage of the female is black, and the ocular skin is blue.
Chatham Robin - There are now around 250 black robins but in 1980 only five survived on Little Mangere Island. They were saved from extinction by Don Merton and his Wildlife Service team, and by "Old Blue", the last remaining fertile female. The remaining birds were moved to Mangere Island. They increased the annual output of Old Blue by removing the first clutch over every year and placing the eggs in the nest of the Chatham race of the Tomtit, a technique known as cross-fostering. The Tomtits raised the first brood, and the Black Robins, having lost their eggs, relaid and raised another brood.
Australian parrot - The Night Parrot is a small broad-tailed parrot endemic to the continent of Australia. The species was originally placed within its own genus , The well-known budgerigar is a not-too-distant relative of these birds.
Flightless Cormorant - With only 1500 estimated individuals, it is one of the world's rarest birds and is the subject of an active conservation program.
Bank Cormorant - The Bank Cormorant is a heavy-bodied bird, roughly 75 cm in length. It is generally black in appearance with a bronze sheen, though the wings are a dark brown rather than a true black. Adults have a small crest on their heads, and normally have a white rump.
Chatham Islands Shag - Its natural habitats are open seas and rocky shores. It is threatened by habitat loss, and considered critically endangered by the IUCN.
Dark-eared Brown Dove - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. It is threatened by habitat loss. However, it seems to decline less dramatically than anticipated. It is thus downlisted from Critically Endangered to Endangered status in the 2007 IUCN Red List.
Alagoas Foliage-gleaner - This species was first discovered in 1979 at Murici in Alagoas, although there have been few sightings in that area since. In 2003 it was discovered at the Frei Caneca Private Reserve in Pernambuco. Due to its rarity it has been classified by BirdLife International as critically endangered. The current population is estimated at between 50 and 249.
Tanzanian Bay Owl - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Waved Albatross - The Waved Albatross, Phoebastria irrorata - also known as Galapagos Albatross - is the only member of the Diomedeidae family located in the tropics. When they forage, the Waved Albatross follow straight paths to a single site off the coast of Peru, about 1,000 km distant to the east. During the non-breeding season, these birds reside primarily in the areas of the Ecuador and Peruvian coasts.
Black-footed Albatross - The Black-footed Albatross, Phoebastria nigripes, is a large seabird from the North Pacific. It is one of three albatrosses that range in the northern hemisphere, nesting on isolated tropical islands.
Sooty Albatross - Sooty Albatrosses are a type of Albatross that belong to Diomedeidae family and come from the Procellariiformes order, along with Shearwaters, Fulmars, Storm-petrels, and Diving-petrels. They share certain identifying features. First, they have nasal passages that attach to the upper bill called naricorns. Although the nostrils on the Albatross are on the sides of the bill. The bills of Procellariiformes are also unique in that they are split into between 7 and 9 horny plates. Finally, they produce a stomach oil made up of wax esters and triglycerides that is stored in the proventriculus. This is used against predators as well as an energy rich food source for chicks and for the adults during their long flights.
Liberian Greenbul - Its natural habitat is subtropical and tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Urich's Tyrannulet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Bahia Tyrannulet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Long-tailed Tyrannulet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Antioquia Bristle-Tyrant - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Minas Gerais Tyrannulet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Black-fronted Piping-Guan - This species is only found on Trinidad; it is close to extinction. They are large birds, 60 cm in length, and similar in general appearance to turkeys, with thin necks and small heads. They are forest birds, and the nest is built in a tree. Three large white eggs are laid, the female alone incubating. This arboreal species feeds on fruit and berries.
Trinidad Piping-Guan - This species is only found on Trinidad; it is close to extinction. They are large birds, 60 cm in length, and similar in general appearance to turkeys, with thin necks and small heads. They are forest birds, and the nest is built in a tree. Three large white eggs are laid, the female alone incubating. This arboreal species feeds on fruit and berries.
Great Philippine Eagle - The species was discovered in 1896 by the English explorer and naturalist John Whitehead, who observed the bird and whose servant, Juan, collected the first specimen a few weeks later.
Gurney's Pitta - This beautiful bird has a blue crown and black-and-yellow underparts. The rest of the head is black, and it has warm brown upperparts. The female has a brown crown and buffy-whitish underparts. The name of this bird commemorates the English ornithologist John Henry Gurney. It eats slugs and worms.
Black-faced Spoonbill - The global population of this species, based on the winter population count carried out in 1988-1990 in all known sites, was estimated at 288 individuals. As of 2006, thanks to conservation efforts over the years, the estimated global population had increased to 1,679 . The niche population of North Korea does not exceed 30 birds, which implies that there must be another colony which has not been discovered yet, and which is perhaps located in northeast China; for example, on the islands of Liaoning .
Gold-naped Weaver - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Bates's Weaver - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Clarke's Weaver - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Usambara Weaver - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes and plantations . It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hooded Grebe - The Hooded Grebe , is a medium-sized grebe found in the southern region of South America. It grows to about 34 cm in length, and is black and white in color . It is found in isolated lakes in the most remote parts of Patagonia, and spends winters along the coast of the same region.
Junin Grebe - The scientific name commemorates the Polish zoologist Władysław Taczanowski, author of Ornithology of Peru .
Bornean Peacock-Pheasant - The Bornean Peacock-pheasant, Polyplectron schleiermacheri is a medium-sized, up to 50cm long, rufous brown and black spotted pheasant with an elongated crest and nape feathers, black below and bare red skin around bluish iris eye. The breast sides are metallic blue-green, bordering the white throat and central upper breast. Its twenty-two tail feathers are decorated with large blue-green ocelli, which may be spread fan-like in display. The female is smaller and duller brown than the male. It has a brown iris and no spurs on its feet.
Rarotonga Flycatcher - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Large Flycatcher - It is critically endangered, with an estimated population of less than 1,000.
Plain-tailed Warbling Finch - The Plain-tailed Warbling-finch is a species of bird in the Thraupidae family. It is endemic to Peru.
Cochabamba Mountain Finch - The Cochabamba Mountain-finch is an endangered species of bird that is endemic to the Cochabamba Department of central Bolivia. Together with the closely related Tucuman Mountain-finch, it was formerly placed in the genus Poospiza.
Rufous-breasted Warbling Finch - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Takahe - The Takahē or South Island Takahē, Porphyrio hochstetteri is a flightless bird indigenous to New Zealand and belonging to the rail family. It was thought to be extinct after the last four known specimens were taken in 1898. However, after a carefully planned search effort the bird was rediscovered by Geoffrey Orbell near Lake Te Anau in the Murchison Mountains, South Island, on November 20, 1948. The specific scientific name commemorates the Austrian geologist Ferdinand von Hochstetter.
Sulu Racquet-tailed Parrot - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Rand's Red-billed Helmet Shrike - It is endemic to Angola.
Tuamotu Sandpiper - The Tuamotu Sandpiper, Prosobonia cancellata, is an endangered member of the large wader family Scolopacidae, that is endemic to the Tuamotu Islands in French Polynesia. It is sometimes placed in the monotypic genus Aechmorhynchus. A native name, apparently in the Tuamotuan language, is kivi-kivi.
Golden-shouldered parakeet - The Golden-shouldered Parrot is 23–28 cm long. The adult male is mainly blue and has a characteristic yellow over the shoulder area. It has a black cap and pale yellow frontal band. It has a pinkish lower belly, thighs and undertail-coverts. It has a Grey-brown lower back. Adult female are mainly dull greenish-yellow, and have a broad cream bar on the underside of the wings. Juveniles are similar to the adult female.
White-shouldered Ibis - The White-shouldered Ibis, Pseudibis davisoni, is a species of wading bird of the ibis family, Threskiornithidae. It occurs at a few sites in northern Cambodia, southern Vietnam, extreme southern Laos and East Kalimantan in Indonesia.
Reunion Petrel - The Mascarene Petrel is a medium-sized, dark gadfly petrel.
Beck's Petrel - Beck’s Petrel, Pseudobulweria becki, is a small, recently rediscovered gadfly petrel. It is dark brown above and on the head and throat. It is dark underneath the wings with a fairly distinct white wingbar. The belly and breast are white. It flies over open oceans with straight wings that are slightly bent back at the tips.
Fiji Petrel - The Fiji Petrel , also known as MacGillivray's Petrel, is a small, dark gadfly petrel.
Maui parrotbill - The Maui parrotbill is one of the larger Hawaiian honeycreepers, measuring 14 centimetres
Psittacula eques - Psittacula eques is a species of Parakeet. There were formally two subspecies, but one, the Réunion Parakeet is now extinct. The extant Mauritius Parakeet is considered endangered.
Psittirostra psittacea - The ʻōʻū is a large, plump forest bird measuring 18 centimetres in length. Males have a bright yellow head, dark green back, and an olive-green belly. Females are duller with an olive-green head. ʻŌʻū has a pink, finch-like bill and pink legs.
Phoenix Petrel - The Phoenix Petrel, Pterodroma alba is a medium-sized, up to 35cm long, tropical seabird with a wingspan of 83cm. It has a dark brown upperparts plumage, white below and whitish throat. Both sexes are similar.
Henderson petrel - During Captain Cook's voyages in the eighteenth century, Daniel Solander wrote in his manuscript of the procuring of a petrel which he named Procellaria atrata. It was not until 1912, when Gregory Mathews published Solander's account, and created this name . However, Mathews did not actually designate a new type, as what Solander had described was considered to be merely hypothetical.
Chatham Island Petrel - Chatham Petrels nest in burrows under the forest canopy to which they are generally faithful to over time. Leaves are used as nesting material. Each pair lays a single white egg in December-January and the chicks fledge in May-June.
Barau's Petrel - The name commemorates Armand Barau, an agricultural engineer and ornithologist from the French territory of Réunion in the Indian Ocean. It is one of the most recently discovered species of seabird and was only described in 1964, although it was known to local people prior to that.
Bermuda petrel - Commonly known in Bermuda as the Cahow, a name derived from its eerie cries, this nocturnal ground-nesting seabird is the national bird of Bermuda, and a symbol of hope for nature conservation. It was thought extinct for 330 years. Its dramatic rediscovery as a "Lazarus species", that is, a species found to be alive after being considered extinct for centuries, has inspired documentary filmmakers.
Jamaican Petrel - This species was last collected in 1879, and was searched for without success between 1996 and 2000. However, it cannot yet be classified as extinct because nocturnal petrels are notoriously difficult to record, and it may conceivably occur on Dominica and Guadeloupe.
Black-capped Petrel - This long-winged petrel has a grey-brown back and wings, with a white nape and rump. Underparts are mainly white apart from a black cap and some dark underwing makings. It picks food items such as squid from the ocean surface.
Schlegel's Petrel - The species feeds mostly on squid, which comprises 87% of its diet in some studies; it will also feed on lanternfishes as they ascend to the surface at night, as well as on crustaceans.
Freira - Zino's Petrel , or Freira, is a small seabird in the gadfly petrel genus. It has also been called the "Madeira Petrel", but this name invites confusion with the Madeira Storm Petrel and is best avoided. Zino's Petrel was previously considered to be a subspecies of Soft-plumaged Petrel P. mollis, but they are not closely related. However, P. madeira is very closely related to Fea's Petrel, another species recently split from P. mollis.
Chatham Island Taiko - The first specimen of the Magenta Petrel was collected from His Italian Majesty's ship Magenta on July 22, 1867 in the South Pacific ocean, midway between New Zealand and South America. The link between it and the presumed-extinct Chatham Island Taiko was only confirmed when the first Taiko was caught on Chatham Island, New Zealand by David Crockett on January 1, 1978. Formerly widespread on Chatham Island, the Taiko is now confined to the forested Tuku valley system on the south-west of the island.
Galapagos Dark-Rumped Petrel - The Galapagos Petrel is an endemic marine bird that nests in areas of high humidity in the highlands of five islands of the Galapagos Archipelago . In the past, the petrel population was severely affected by introduced mammals. These introduced animals depredated and altered the nesting colonies, placing the petrel in the category of Critically Endangered species listed in the Red Book of Threatened Birds. One of the greatest threats to the population of petrels is the presence of the Black Rat , an introduced species that is the principal cause of mortality of eggs and hatchlings of the species. Introduced plants have also altered and restricted the nesting habitat. The reproductive period of the petrels covers about eight months of the year. A study carried out in 2002 showed an egg-laying period between March to the end of October, with a peak occurring during the first two weeks of August.
Ripley's Fruit Dove - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss. In fact, there have been no recorded sightings of it since 1953; it may or may not be extinct.
Marianas fruit-dove - The female lays a single white egg. The chick and egg are tended to by both parents. Its diet consists mainly of fruits.
Townsend's Shearwater - Townsend's Shearwater, Puffinus auricularis, is a rare seabird of the tropics from the family Procellariidae.
Hutton's Shearwater - It is an endemic breeder of New Zealand, with breeding restricted to only two remaining colonies in the Kaikoura Seaward Ranges, Kaikoura. During the non-breeding winter months migration occurs to South Australia. Some anecdotal evidence suggests pre-breeding birds circumnavigate Australia in the years leading up to sexual maturity.
Balearic Shearwater - The Balearic Shearwater is a medium-sized shearwater in the seabird family Procellariidae. It was long regarded a subspecies of the Manx Shearwater; see there for more on the Puffinus puffinus superspecies; following an initial split it was held to be a subspecies of the "Mediterranean Shearwater" for nearly ten more years, until it was resolved to be a distinct species, separate from the Yelkouan Shearwater . It is the last taxon of the puffinus complex that was recognized as a separate entity.
Puffinus newelli - Newell's Shearwater or Hawaiian Shearwater is a seabird belonging to the genus Puffinus in the family Procellariidae. It belongs to a confusing group of shearwaters which are difficult to identify and whose classification is controversial. It was formerly treated as a subspecies of the Manx Shearwater and is now often placed in Townsend's Shearwater . It is endemic to the Hawaiian Islands as a breeding bird. Its population is declining and it is classed as an endangered species by BirdLife International. It is known in Hawaiian as the ʻaʻo.
Azores' Bullfinch - The Azores Bullfinch , also known as the São Miguel Bullfinch , or locally in Portuguese as the Priolo, is a critically endangered passerine bird in the true finch family. It is endemic to São Miguel Island, in the Azores archipelago of Macaronesia in the North Atlantic Ocean.
Grey-breasted Parakeet - The Grey-breasted Parakeet is a species of parrot in the family Psittacidae. It is endemic to Ceará in north-eastern Brazil and restricted to a few mountains with relatively humid forest and woodland in a region otherwise dominated by arid Caatinga.
El Oro Parakeet - The body is mostly covered by a darkish green color with a red forehead . The edges of the wings, and the end of the tail, also have this same red color. On the outer edges of the wings, there is a bluish color. Feet are dark grey, the eyes are surrounded by a white circle and the bill is horn colored. It is approximately 22cm long and weighs 73g.
Pfrimer's parakeet - The Pfrimer's Parakeet , in aviculture also known as Pfrimer's Conure, is a species of parrot in the family Psittacidae. It is endemic to Goiás and Tocantins in Brazil. It is restricted to deciduous and semi-deciduous Caatinga forest.
Santa Marta Conure - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Rallus semiplumbeus - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland, freshwater lakes, and freshwater marshes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Plain-flanked Rail - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical mangrove forests and coastal saline lagoons. It is threatened by habitat loss.
White-throated Jungle-Flycatcher - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Jerdon's Courser - The Jerdon's Courser is a nocturnal bird belonging to the pratincole and courser family Glareolidae endemic to India. The bird was discovered by the surgeon-naturalist Thomas C. Jerdon in 1848 but not seen again until its rediscovery in 1986. This courser is a restricted-range endemic found locally in India in the Eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh. It is currently known only from the Sri Lankamalleshwara Sanctuary, where it inhabits sparse scrub forest with patches of bare ground.
Pink-headed duck - The Pink-headed Duck is a large diving duck that was once found in parts of the Gangetic plains of India, Bangladesh and in the riverine swamps of Myanmar but feared extinct since the 1950s. Numerous searches have failed to provide any proof of continued existence. It has been suggested that it may exist in the inaccessible swamp regions of northern Myanmar and some sight reports from that region have led to its status being declared as "critically endangered" rather than extinct. The genus placement has been disputed and while some have suggested that it is close to the pochards, particularly Netta rufina, others have placed it in a separate genus of its own. It is somewhat unique in the pink colouration of the head combined with a dark body. A small wing patch is prominent, a feature also found in the common Indian Spot-billed Duck. The eggs have also been held as particularly peculiar in being nearly spherical.
Rhopornis ardesiacus - The Slender Antbird is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It is monotypic within the genus Rhopornis. It is endemic to Brazil.
Thick-billed parrot - The Thick-billed Parrot is a medium-sized, up to 38 cm  long, bright green parrot with a large black bill and a red forecrown, shoulder and thighs. Adult eyes are amber, while juveniles have brown eyes. The rest of the bird is bright green. Thick-billed Parrots show red shoulders and leading edge on the underwing, followed by a blackish green stripe, then a yellow stripe, followed by the remaining underwing showing dark green. It appears to show a blackish tail.
Kagu - The Kagu's affinities are not too well resolved. It was long one of the most enigmatic birds and in more recent times usually affiliated with the Gruiformes. It was initially classed as a member of the family Ardeidae because of its powder down, and an affinity with the Ardeidae is suggested by some morphological The case for this is not strengthened by more recent data however.
Titicaca flightless grebe - This is a mid-sized grebe, varying from 28-45 cm in overall length. It weighs up to 600 g. Its coloration is unmistakable. The only grebe species it somewhat resembles is the unrelated Red-necked Grebe which is not found in South America. The only congener, the White-tufted Grebe, does not look very similar. The color pattern of the Titicaca Grebe is altogether similar to that of the Red-necked Grebe, but it has a darker belly, and a white throat patch that runs down the neck nearly to the breast. Due to the short wings, the rufous flanks can usually be seen. The ornamental plumes on the head are a vestigial version of those of the White-tufted Grebe, but dark. Iris and the lower bill are yellow. Juveniles and non-breeding adults are duller, lack the ornamental plumes, and in the case of the former have rufous stripes on the sides of the head and more white on the neck, so that the rufous breast does not show in swimming birds.
Gough Finch - It is endemic to the remote South Atlantic Gough Island which politically belongs to the British overseas territory of Saint Helena. Its natural habitats are temperate shrubland and subantarctic grassland.
Truk White-eye - Its habitat is montane rainforest dominated by the endemic Chuuk Poinsontree. Due to it restricted range on one small mountaintop and the locals' disdain for the native poisontree, it is severely threatened by habitat loss.
Red-headed Vulture - Up to 85 cm long and weighing 3.7-5.4 kg , this gaudy-faced vulture was historically abundant with range over south-central and south-eastern Asia extending from Pakistan to Singapore. Today the range of the Red-headed Vulture is localized primarily to Nepal and northern India where it is found in open country and in cultivated and semi-desert areas.
White-winged Crake - The only breeding records are from highland marshes of central Ethiopia. It is also a very local and apparently summer visitor to highland marshes south of the equator. It is yet unknown whether the northern and southern populations are distinct, but their physical features appear identical. The birds are however not resident in any of the few known sites, sometimes departing after as little as six weeks when conditions turn unfavourable.
Slender-billed Flufftail - Its natural habitats are swamps and arable land. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Fuerteventura Chat - The Fuerteventura Chat is a small passerine bird that was classed as a member of the thrush family Turdidae, but is now more generally considered to be an Old World flycatcher in the Muscicapidae. It, and similar small European species, are often called chats. It was included in the "Common Stonechat" , but it is quite distinct; it is likely to be an insular derivative of ancestral European Stonechats that colonised the islands some 1-2 mya, during the Early Pleistocene .
Schizoeaca perijana - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland and subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Obi Woodcock - An Indonesian endemic, the Moluccan Woodcock is restricted to two small islands in North Maluku. It is known from eight specimens, with the most recent collected in 1980. Nothing is known of its habits.
Rufous Fishing Owl - The Rufous Fishing-owl, Chouette D'Ussher, Chouette-pêcheuse Rousse, Búho Pescador Rojizo, or Cárabo Pescador Rojizo is a species of owl in the Strigidae family. It is found in Ivory Coast, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Tall-grass wetland tapaculo - It is a small, dumpy bird with broad tail-feathers and a total length of approximately 12.5 cm. The upperparts are plain blackish in colour while the underparts are dark grey. The flanks are slightly barred with brown, at least in young birds. The legs are reddish-brown and the bill is dark. The song includes a long series of short 'tchek' notes. The birds run rapidly and will fly short distances when flushed.
El Oro Tapaculo - It is a small tapaculo, 11 centimetres long. The bill is black and fairly heavy. The plumage is grey with a brown nape and rump and brown barring on the flanks. The tail is blackish. The female's underparts are browner than those of the male. The song is a series of double-notes repeated for about a minute.
Scytalopus rodriguezi - It is a restricted-range endemic presently known only from two localities on the eastern slope of the Cordillera Central at the head of the Magdalena Valley, Colombia at 2000 m or more above sea-level. Its range is believed to be no greater than 170 km², and its population around 2,200 pairs; due to its recent description, no formal evaluation of its conservation status has taken place yet, however. It is found in humid forests with dense understorey.
Juan Fernandez Firecrown - The population of this species has been in a general decline for years. A census made in October 2002 revealed fewer than 200 individual birds and of these only 60 females, although scientifically sound census methods have not yet been used to provide a reliable figure. The species is ranked Critically Endangered by Birdlife International. A conservation effort was begun in 2004 by a partnership of several organizations with the aim of preventing extinction of the species.
Yellow-throated Serin - The Yellow-Throated Seedeater is a species of finch in the Fringillidae family. It is found only in Ethiopia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry shrubland and subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Sheppardia aurantiithorax - The species is thought to be fairly common in montane forests within its small range, but its very limited distribution has let to it being classified as Endangered species in the 2008 IUCN Red List.
Gabela Akalat - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Usambara Akalat - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Jamaican Poorwill - The Jamaican Pauraque, Jamaican Poorwill, or Jamaican Least-pauraqué is a species of nightjar in the Caprimulgidae family. It is endemic to Jamaica. Its natural habitats are tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland. It is critically endangered or possibly already extinct due to a combination of introduced predators and habitat destruction.
Algerian Nuthatch - The Algerian Nuthatch is a resident bird of four areas of mountain forest in northeast Algeria. Its range is limited by the availability of woodland, and it occurs only above 1000m, with the population density increasing with altitude.
White-browed Nuthatch - The endangered White-browed Nuthatch is known only from the Mount Victoria area of Burma, where forest up to 2,000 m has been almost totally cleared and habitat between 2,000-2,500 m has been heavily degraded. The population of a few thousand birds is decreasing, and no conservation measures are in place..
Galapagos penguin - The Galapagos Penguin is the third smallest penguin.
Java Hawk Eagle - The Javan Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus bartelsi is a medium-sized, approximately 61cm long, dark brown raptor in the family Accipitridae. It has a long crest, rufous head and neck, and heavily barred black below. The crest is black with white tip. Both sexes are similar. The young is duller and has unmarked underparts.
Sunda Hawk-Eagle - An Indonesian endemic, the Flores Hawk-eagle is distributed in lowland and submontane forests of Flores, Lombok and Sumbawa of Lesser Sunda Islands group. The diet consists mainly of birds, lizards, snakes and mammals.
Worthen's sparrow - Spizella wortheni can range in heights from 12.5–14 cm. It is identifiable by its distinctive head pattern. It has a grey head with a rufous crown, a brown postocular stripe and a pink bill. It has grey-brown upperparts, with dark brown streaks. It has a grey bottom, and dark brown wings and tail. Its wings are "edged paler, with broad whitish to pale buff wing-bar, buffy-rufous tertial and secondary edging, and greyish lesser coverts."³
Botha's Lark - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland and pastureland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hooded Seedeater - This has a length of eleven centimetres and is so oddly patterned that some scientists regard it variously as either a hybrid or an abnormal specimen of the Yellow-bellied Seedeater . The bird had a black crest and throat. The upperparts are olive. The underparts show a dingy buff. In contrast, the Yellow-bellied Seedeater has pale yellow underparts and the black coloring extends to the upperbreast.
Marsh Seedeater - It is found in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay. It is migratory, breeding in wet grasslands and marshes around Uruguay and Argentina and migrating northwards in the austral winter to wet and dry grasslands in southern Brazil.
Narosky's Seedeater - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland and subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Negros Tree Babbler - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Blue-headed Quail-Dove - Its natural habitats are swamps and moist forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Sterna albostriata - The Black-fronted Tern also known as Sea Martin, Ploughboy, Inland Tern, Riverbed Tern or Tarapiroe, is a small tern generally found in or near bodies of fresh water in New Zealand and forages for freshwater fish, arthropods and worms. It has a predominantly grey plumage. Restricted to breeding in the eastern regions of South Island, it is declining and threatened by introduced mammals and birds.
Chinese Crested Tern - The Chinese Crested Tern is a seabird of the tern family Sternidae, closely related to Sandwich Tern T. sandvicensis and Lesser Crested Tern T. bengalensis. It is most similar to the former, differing only in the bill pattern, which is the reverse of the Sandwich Tern's, being yellow with a black tip. From Lesser Crested Tern, which it overlaps in wintering distribution, it can be told by the white rump and paler grey mantle, as well as the black tip to the bill, which seen from up close also has a white point. The larger Greater Crested Tern is also similar, differing in the stouter, all-yellow bill and darker grey mantle and rump, as well as in size.
Chilean Tern - The Peruvian Tern is a species of tern in the Sternidae family. It is found in northern Chile, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitats are hot deserts, sandy shores, and coastal saline lagoons. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mallee Emu-wren - Its natural habitat is temperate grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Kakapo - Kakapo are critically endangered; as of February 2010, only 123 Two large Fiordland islands, Resolution and Secretary, have been the subject of large-scale ecological restoration activities to prepare self-sustaining ecosystems with suitable habitat for the Kakapo.
Black-winged Starling - The Black-winged Starling is a species of starling in the family Sturnidae. The species is also known as the Black-winged Myna or the White-breasted Starling. It is endemic to Indonesia. There are three recognised subspecies, the nominate race, which occurs across much of the island of Java, tricolor, which is restricted to south east Java, and tertius, which is found on Bali and possibly Lombok. The validity of the records on Lombok has been called into question, there are only a few records and they may represent escapees from the cagebird trade or natural vagrants. The species has often been assigned to the starling genus Sturnus, but is now placed in Acridotheres because it is behaviourally and vocally closer to the birds in that genus.
Paran - It is threatened by habitat loss and currently considered Endangered by BirdLife International.
Hoary-throated Spinetail - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Russet-bellied Spinetail - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Lesser Florican - In their breeding display, the male jumps into the air above the grass level.
Alaotra Grebe - This species declined in the course of the 20th century, mainly due to habitat destruction and predation by introduced snakehead murrel . Also, the few remaining birds increasingly hybridized with Little Grebes which use the wetlands as a migration stopover site; as the species differed in several key aspects, the hybrid birds may have suffered from decreased fitness, to the detriment of the rufolavatus gene pool.
Bahama Swallow - This glossy Tachycineta swallow has a green head and back, blue upper wings, a black tail and wingtips, and a white belly and chin.
Crested Shelduck - The Crested Shelduck or Korean Crested Shelduck, Tadorna cristata, is a species of bird in the family Anatidae. It is critically endangered and believed by some to be extinct. The male Crested Shelduck has a greenish-black crown, breast, primaries, and tail, while the rest of its face, chin, and throat are brownish black. The male's belly, undertail coverts, and flanks are a dark grey with black striations. The upper wing coverts are white, while its speculum is an iridescent green. The female has a white eye ring, black crest, white face, chin, throat, neck, and uppers wing coverts and a dark brown body with white striations. Both sexes also have a distinctive green tuft of feathers protruding from the head.
Azure-rumped Tanager - Its plumage is mostly very pale blue, though it has a periwinkle crown. It also has a black mask around its lores. The bill is gray with a dark tip. The mantle is mottled green and black. The wings and tail are black with blue edgings. This bird makes a wi sseeu song and a sii call.
Grey-bellied Comet - The Grey-bellied Comet is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found only in Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland and rural gardens. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Bannerman's Turaco - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Nihoa Finch - The Nihoa Finch is one of the two endemic bird species of the tiny Hawaiian island Nihoa, the other being the Nihoa Millerbird. When it was classified in 1917, scientists thought that it would be the last endemic species named. This was later found untrue. The island's population is 1000-3000 birds. The Nihoa Finch was put down on the Endangered Species List by the US.
Yellow-rumped Antwren - The Yellow-rumped Antwren is endemic to the Yungas of Bolivia and immediately adjacent Peru . It is rarely seen but has been recorded at the Cochabamba-Villa Tunari road, Chapare, Cochabamba, in 1979; in the Serranía Bellavista north of Caranavi, La Paz, in 1979-1980 and 1997, although playback surveys at the start of the breeding season in 2005 failed to find it and it may no longer be present there; Cerro Asunta Plata, La Paz in 1993; Rio Paracti, Chapare, Cochabamba in 2000, and between San Juan del Oro and Putina Punco, Puno in 2007. It may have been overlooked to some extent, and it may possibly occur in reasonably high density along the Manu road, where it occurs above its congener T. calliota in the only known area of overlap. A population estimate exceeding 10,000 individuals has been suggested, although the species does appear to be naturally rare and patchily distributed, and playback surveys in several areas of prime habitat have failed to find it. Numbers have almost certainly declined substantial
Orange-bellied Antwren - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Seychelles Paradise Flycatcher - The length of the males is about 20 cm. In addition there are two long black central tail feathers which can reach a length of 30 cm. The females can reach a length between 16 and 18 cm . The males are entirely glossy black with a deep blue sheen. The upperparts of the females including wings and tail are reddish brown. The underparts are pale cream white. Facial skin, bill, and legs are blue.
Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross - The Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross, Thalassarche carteri, in the albatross family, and is a smallest of the mollymawks. In 2004, BirdLife International
Pink-footed albatross - The Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatross, Thalassarche chlororhynchos, is a large seabird in the albatross family. This small mollymawk was once considered conspecific with the Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross and known as the Yellow-nosed Albatross. Some authorities still believe the species to be the same, such as Jeff Clements
Chatham Albatross - The Chatham Albatross, Chatham Mollymawk, or Chatham Islands Mollymawk, Thalassarche eremita, is a medium-sized black-and-white albatross which breeds only on The Pyramid, a large rock stack in the Chatham Islands, New Zealand. It is sometimes treated as a subspecies of the Shy Albatross Thalassarche cauta. It is the smallest of the Shy Albatross group.
Black-browed Albatross - The Black-browed Albatross or Black-browed Mollymawk, Thalassarche melanophrys, is a large seabird of the albatross family Diomedeidae, and it is the most widespread and common albatross.
Thaumatibis gigantea - The Giant Ibis, Thaumatibis gigantea, the only species in the monotypic genus Thaumatibis, is a wading bird of the ibis family, Threskiornithidae. It is confined to northern Cambodia, with a few birds surviving in extreme southern Laos.
Shore Plover - The Shore Plover is an endangered species with a world population of around 200 birds. It once was found across the South Island in New Zealand but became extinct there, probably due to the predations of introduced cats and rats. It survived on one island, Rangatira, in the Chatham Islands, from where it has been introduced to other offshore islands in the Chathams and near the North Island.
Threskiornis bernieri - The Malagasy Sacred Ibis is a species of bird in the Threskiornithidae family. It is found in Madagascar and Seychelles. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, estuarine waters, intertidal flats, and coastal saline lagoons. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Niceforo's Wren - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Tuamotu Kingfisher - The Tuamotu Kingfisher is a species of bird in the Alcedinidae family. It is endemic to French Polynesia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, plantations and rural gardens.
Marquesan Kingfisher - The Marquesan Kingfisher is a species of bird in the Alcedinidae family. It is endemic to French Polynesia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and plantations. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Zapata Sparrow - The Zapata Sparrow is confined and endemic to Cuba. It was discovered by Spanish zoologist, Fermín Zanón Cervera in March 1927 around Santo Tomás in Zapata Swamp and formally described by American herpetologist Thomas Barbour and his compatriot, ornithologist James Lee Peters in 1927.
Black-eared Parrotlet - It is mostly known from lower montane evergreen forest at 500-1,200m, but also up to 1,400m in the Itatiaia National Park. In addition it is found in near sea-level in Bahia and São Paulo.
Cozumel Thrasher - This bird has brown upperparts and white underparts with black streaks. It has a grey face, a long black bill with a downward curve and two white wing bars.
Timor Green Pigeon - The Timor Green-pigeon is a species of bird in the Columbidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Timor-Leste. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Long-legged Warbler - The Long-legged Warbler is a large thin warbler with a long tail and long legs. The species' plumage is reddish brown, the throat, breast and belly being white and the face being marked with a distinctive eye-stripe. The Long-legged Warbler is a shy bird and easily overlooked as it forages on the ground in pairs or small family groups. It has a distinctive alarm call, and a variable and loud song somewhat similar to that of the Fiji Bush-warbler. The species inhabits old-growth forest in mountainous areas on Viti Levu, usually in habitat adjacent to streams.
Spotted Greenshank - The Spotted Greenshank or Nordmann's Greenshank Tringa guttifer is a wader in the large family Scolopacidae, the typical waders.
Turdus helleri - The Taita Thrush was previously classified as subspecies of the Olive Thrush , but it is regarded as distinct species since 1985. It reaches a length between 20 to 22 centimetres. Head, breast and upperparts are coloured darkly. The underparts are white and the flanks have a rufous hue. The eyes and the bill exhibit a pale orange coloration. It was named after zoologist Edmund Heller a workmate of the American ornithologist Edgar Alexander Mearns who described this species scientifically in 1913.
Buff-breasted Buttonquail - The Buff-breasted Buttonquail measures from 18-23 inches and usually weighs over 110 grams . Both the tail and wings are short. The back is chestnut. The sides of the head are marked with chestnut on an otherwise plain gray head; while the breast is warm buff-colored. The Painted Buttonquail and the Brown Quail both coexist with this species. The Buff-breasted is larger than either and is quite different different from the all-dark quail. The Painted species is almost totally mottled, with bold white spotting on the breast and no warm buff coloration. The most similar species to the Buff-breasted is the Chestnut-backed Buttonquail, which does not overlap in the wild.
Giant Kingbird - The Giant Kingbird is found in tall lowland forest. In particular it favours pine forests and the wooded borders of waterways. It is also found in mixed pine barrens, open woodlands, swamps and savanna. It has also been seen in cloud forest.
Sociable Lapwing - The Sociable Lapwing or Sociable Plover is a wader in the lapwing family of birds.
Javanese Lapwing - The Javanese Lapwing, Vanellus macropterus also known as Javanese Wattled Lapwing is a wader in the lapwing family.
Bachman's wood warbler - Bachman's Warbler is possibly extinct, and was most likely never common. The last confirmed sightings were in 1988 and before that in 1961 in South Carolina. The Bachman's Warbler's last stronghold was in I'on Swamp, South Carolina. Habitat destruction was probably the main cause of its disappearance. Its extinction is not yet officially announced, because habitat remaining in Congaree National Park needs to be surveyed. Furthermore, on January 14, 2002, a bird reminiscent of a female Bachman's Warbler was filmed at Guardalavaca, Cuba. As Vermivora warblers are not known to live more than about 7 years, if the identification is correct it would imply that a breeding population managed to survive undiscovered for decades.
Kuhl's Lorikeet - The Kuhl's Lorikeet also called Rimatara Lorikeet, Rimitara Lorikeet, Kuhl's Lory, or Kura is a species of lorikeet in the Psittacidae family. It is one of several species of Vini lorikeets found in islands ranging across the South Pacific. It is a fast flying lorikeet with vibrant plumage; a green back, wings and crown, a blue nape and legs and bright red undersides and cheeks.
Vireo masteri - The species was not described until 1996.
Regent Honeyeater - Recent genetic research suggests it is closely related to the wattlebirds.
Long-whiskered Owlet - The Long-whiskered Owlet is mainly brown with a whitish belly and eye brow. The large eyes are orange-brown. Although it has no ear tufts, this small owl's facial feathers extend out past its head, making it appear to have long tufts. The name of its monotypic genus Xenoglaux means "strange owl" and – among others – refers to these long facial feathers. With a total length of 13-14 cm , it is among the smallest owls in the world. The Long-whiskered Owlet is one of the rarest birds in the world. It was filmed and photographed in January 2010 by researchers at La Esperanza, Peru. Fewer than 15 people have ever seen this bird in the wild. To see the video taken by the researchers visit: http://neoprimate.org/news/lang/en/. Several birds were spotted in an area only a few miles west of the Abra Patricia Reserve where the bird was seen in 2008. The reserve was created with funding from American Bird Conservancy and is owned and managed by ABC’s Peruvian conservation partner ECOAN. With help from ABC and ECOAN abou
Udzungwa Partridge - Discovered only in 1991, this bird was first noticed as a pair of strange feet in a cooking pot in a Tanzanian forest camp. It inhabits and is endemic to forests of the Udzungwa Mountains in Tanzania. A second population from the Rubeho Highlands was initially believed to be a well-marked subspecies, but is now recognized to be specifically distinct. The diet consists mainly of beetles, ants and seeds.
Van Dam's Vanga - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Sierra Madre Sparrow - It is the sole species in the genus Xenospiza; the genus is closely related to Ammodramus , differing mainly in the longer, less pointed tail, and restriction to high altitude alpine grassland habitats.
Stresemann's Bush Crow - The range of this species is quite restricted being confined to thorn Acacia country in southern Ethiopia near Yavello , Mega and Arero. It can be curiously absent from apparently suitable country nearby to these areas, the reasons for this not being apparent.
Spotted Ground Thrush - These birds are about 23cm in length, with brown upper parts and white to off-white lower parts which are darkly spotted.
White-breasted Silver Eye - It reaches a length up to fourteen centimetres and therefore it is one of the largest white-eyes. The wingspan is 7.5 cm and the weight is about 30 grams. Its appearance is characterized by a pale green head, an olive green coloured neck and white throat and belly parts. A further feature is a conspicuous eye ring of white feathers. Males and females are coloured similarly. Its diet consists of fruits, berries, nectar, and insects. Its only habitat is a 5 km² large forested area around Mount Pitt on Norfolk Island where it lives solitary. In the breeding season from October to December the couple build a cup-shaped nest in which two white eggs are laid. The incubation time lasts eleven days and another eleven days later the juveniles became fully fledged.
Zosterops chloronothus - The Mauritius Olive White-eye is a very rare passerine from the family of white-eyes . It is endemic to the island of Mauritius.
Splendid White-eye - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and plantations . It is threatened by habitat loss.
Seychelles Grey White-eye - This ten to eleven centimetre long bird has a plumage with olive grey upperparts and dull coloured underparts. It is further characterized by a white narrow eye-ring, a rather long dark grey tail and a small sharp bill. Its diet consists of insect larvaes, locusts, and grasshoppers as well as berries and seeds. The breeding season is from September to April and a clutch of two to seven eggs is laid into a cup-shaped nest. The incubation time is thirteen to fifteen days and the young are fully fledged after eleven to sixteen days. After that the parents are looking after them another two months. Its melodious and complex song consists of nasal tones. Due to its ecology and foraging in the canopy of high trees it is difficult to observe.
Zosterops nehrkorni - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Rota White-eye - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Slender-billed White-eye - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.

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