Sunbittern

The sunbittern is usually placed in the Gruiformes, but this was always considered preliminary. In some aspects of its morphology the Sunbittern is close to the herons and their relatives , but this appears to be convergent evolution due to similar lifestyles. Altogether, the two species seem to form a minor Gondwanan lineage which possibly also includes the extinct adzebills and/or the mesites, and is of unclear relation to the Gruiformes proper. Notably, the Kagu and mesites also have powder down.

Picture of the Sunbittern has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution.
Original source: bird at the DC zoo
Author: Brent Moore from Smyrna, TN, USA

The Sunbittern is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

The Sunbittern, Eurypyga helias is a bittern-like bird of tropical regions of the Americas, and the sole member of the family Eurypygidae (sometimes spelled Eurypigidae) and genus Eurypyga. More

* When the sunbittern unfolds its tail, a sunburst of color and an enormous eye-like design are revealed. More

The Sunbittern, Eurypyga helias is a bittern-like bird of tropical regions of the Americas, and the sole member of the family Eurypygidae (sometimes spelled Eurypigidae) and genus Eurypyga. The Sunbittern is normally found near wooded streams or creeks at elevations of up to 900 m. It hunts fish and other small vertebrates much in the same way as herons do. The bird has a generally subdued coloration, with fine linear patterns of black, grey and brown. More

in length, sunbitterns rarely fly, but, rather, walk slowly upon long, bright orange legs, holding their snakelike necks parallel to the ground. Found singly or in pairs, they are native to the thick, tropical jungles and swamps of Central and South America. They are silent creatures and use their long and straight, sharply pointed bills to spear their diet of insects and small fish. More

Sunbittern (See Below), and as such is considered a member of the Gruiformes. The Kagu is the National Bird of New Caledonia and was known as the 'Ghost of the Forest' by some Melanesians. It is a relatively long lived bird, as are many of the Gruiformes, with individual birds reaching 20 or more years of age in captivity. It is an endangered species with a total population of 650 birds in 1991. More

Sunbittern is the only member of the family Eurypygidae. It is a wonderful bird, mid-rail mid- heron, which performs spectacular displays. We can find three subspecies: E.h. major, E.h. meridionalis, and E.h. helias. They differ on upperparts’ pattern. VOICE: Sunbittern utters high, penetrating whistle “wuuuuuuuu”, often repeated twice. Alarm call is a loud “kak,kak,kak,kak” of several notes. When the bird is disturbed, it gives high-pitched, thin trill. More

sunbittern, common name for a graceful, stout-bodied, bitternlike bird, Eurypyga helias. It is named for its wing markings, an orange-chestnut shield set in an orange-buff circle, which looks like a setting sun. The rest of its plumage is intricately barred, striped, and mottled in black, white, brown, gray, and olive. Measuring from 18 to 21 in. (46–53 cm) in length, sunbitterns rarely fly, but, rather, walk slowly upon long, bright orange legs, holding their snakelike necks parallel to the ground. More

Sunbitterns are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Gruiformes, family Eurypygidae. The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia Copyright � 2010, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. More

The sunbittern live in heavily forested water edges of the neotropics, from Guatemala to northern Brazil. Natural diet: Sunbitterns eat insects, small fish, amphibians and crustaceans. Size / weight range: This bird grows to be 18 to 21 inches in length. Females weigh between 165-175 g and males between 195-220 g. No dimorphic differences in sexes, meaning males and females have the same features. More

An intricately patterned bird, the sunbittern has a blue head with white strips above and below the eye. The bird’s back features alternating black, white, blue and brown stripes, which help the bird blend into the forest habitats where it lives. The sunbittern can spread its wings to display large red, yellow and black spots, which can scare away predators, who mistake the markings for eyes. More

Sunbittern is the closest living relative of the Kagu. For example, Fain & Houde found these to be certainly sister taxa. They and the mesites did not group with traditional gruiformes in their study, but instead with their proposed clade Metaves, which also includes the hoatzin, pigeons, Caprimulgiformes, flamingos, tropicbirds, Apodiformes, sandgrouse and grebes. More

sunbitternThere is one species in this family. The sunbittern lives from Mexico to Brazil in woodland swamps and forests. It is about 18 inches in length and has a long, straight bill; a long, skinny neck; a long, pointed tail and medium length legs. Its most unusual feature is the large "eyespots" on its wings that are only visible when its wings are open. It use these eyespots to startle prey! Endangered in NH Endangered in N.H. More

The Sunbittern is normally found near wooded streams or creeks at elevations of up to 909 m. It hunts fish and other small vertebrates much in the same way as herons do. The bird has a generally subdued coloration, with fine linear patterns of black, grey and brown. Its remiges however have vividly-colored middle webs, which with wings fully spread show bright eyespots in red, yellow, and black. More

The Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias) is a tropical New World wading bird. To see other photos, go to www.dpughphoto.com. Our main storefront is at www.dpughphoto.com/storefront. * Home & Office (back to top) * Sunbittern Tile CoasterSunbittern Tile Coaster $7. More

Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias) by Lee at Lowry Park Zoo 2-4-10 Sunbittern (Eurypyga helias) by Lee at Lowry Park Zoo 2-4-10 Let them praise the name of the LORD: for his name alone is excellent; his glory is above the earth and heaven. (Psalms 148:13 KJV) Today, Dan and I went to the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, Florida. More

The sunbittern is notable for its exceptional chestnut, black, and buff-yellow "eyespots" on the dorsal side of its wings, which it uses in defensive displays. Many cryptically marked male bustards can erect their feathers in magnificent fashion during courtship displays. Several Gruiforme species have bright red or orange legs, bills, or frontal shields. A few rails, most notably among the gallinules, are greenish or purple. More

The sunbittern has long legs and a slender heron-like neck with a long bill. It is approximately 45.7 cm (18 in.) in length, with a stout body and relatively small head. Its body plumage is brown with darker stripes. The head is almost all black with white striping above and below the ruby-red eyes. The sunbittern's neck, breast and shoulders are brown, while the belly, throat and undertail are white. More

sunbittern common name for a graceful, stout-bodied, bitternlike bird, Eurypyga helias. Answer verified with This answer was verified with Encyclopedia.com Get more facts and information about sunbittern. Or, view the full encyclopedia entry from The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. More

A long-billed bird, the sunbittern has a thin neck and patterned feathers. When threatened, it will spread its wings to display numerous eyespots. With its tail lifted as well, its feathers form a semicircle. More

Picture of Eurypyga helias above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike.
Original source: Stavenn
Author: Stavenn
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Gruiformes
Family : Eurypygidae
Genus : Eurypyga
Species : helias
Authority : (Pallas, 1781)
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