Birds beginning with A

Abbott's Booby - Abbott’s Booby is a large endangered seabird of the gannet family, Sulidae. It belongs to the monotypical genus Papasula. Found normally only on and around Christmas Island , it is the sole living member of the genus Papasula. This species is named for William Louis Abbott who discovered it on Assumption Island in 1892.
Abbott's Jungle Babbler - It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Abbott's Starling - The name of the species commemorates William Louis Abbott , American naturalist and collector, who studied the wildlife of the Indo-Malayan region.
Abdim's Stork - The Abdim's Stork is distributed to open habitats throughout Eastern Africa, from Ethiopia south to South Africa. Its diet consists mainly of locusts, caterpillars and other large insects.
Aberdare Mountain Cisticola - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Aberrant Bush Warbler - It is found in South Asia.
Abert's towhee - This bird is common in brushy riparian habitats in the Lower Sonoran desert zone but may require some effort to see as it prefers to stay well-hidden under bushes. Though threatened by cowbird nest parasitism and habitat loss, it has successfully colonized suburban environments in the Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area and may be fairly easily seen on the campus of Arizona State University. Despite its limited range, it is classified as a species of least concern in the IUCN Redlist, and there has been some range expansion along the Santa Cruz River as well as in Oak Creek Canyon near Sedona.
Abyssinian Catbird - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests.
Abyssinian Crimson-wing - It is found in Burundi, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda.
Abyssinian Ground Thrush - The Abyssinian Ground-thrush Zoothera piaggiae is a passerine bird native to north-east Africa. It lives at high altitude in montane forests.
Abyssinian Ground-Hornbill - The Abyssinian Ground-hornbill is an African bird, found north of the equator. Groups of ground-hornbills have territories of 2-100 square miles. They are diurnal
Abyssinian Lark - M. alopex has a large range, with an estimated global Extent of Occurrence of 100,000-1,000,000 square km.
Abyssinian Longclaw - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland and arable land.The Abyssinian Longclaw is very similar in both appearance and behavior to the Yellow-throated Longclaw of other parts of Africa. It is a common grassland bird of the western and south eastern highlands of Ethiopia except in the extreme north where it does not occur.
Abyssinian Nightjar - The Montane Nightjar is a species of nightjar in the Caprimulgidae family. It is found in Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.
Abyssinian Owl - This owl prefers open grasslands or moorlands with oak or cedar forests, and it occurs in mountain valleys and gorges up to 3900 meters above sea level. It lives in a large range in Africa from the Democratic Republic of the Congo to Ethiopia .
Abyssinian Roller - The Abyssinian Roller is a large bird, nearly the size of a Jackdaw at 28-30 cm. It has a warm brown back, with the rest of the plumage mainly blue. Adults have long tail streamers. Sexes are similar, but the juvenile is a drabber version of the adult.
Abyssinian Scimitar-bill - The Abyssinian Scimitarbill is a species of bird in the Phoeniculidae family. It is found in Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda.
Abyssinian Siskin - The Abyssinian Siskin is a species of finch in the Fringillidae family. It is found only in Ethiopia usually at altitudes above 2,000 metres . Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.
Abyssinian Slaty-Flycatcher - The Abyssinian Slaty-flycatcher is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is often placed in the genus Dioptrornis instead. Its natural habitats are forest, woodland and farmlands in the highlands of Eritrea and Ethiopia.
Abyssinian Woodpecker - The Abyssinian Woodpecker is a species of bird in the Picidae family. It is found in Eritrea and Ethiopia.
Abyssinian Yellow-rumped Seedeater - The Yellow-rumped Serin or Abyssinian Yellow-rumped Seedeater is a species of finch in the Fringillidae family. It is found in Eritrea and Ethiopia. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Acacia Grey Tit - The Ashy Tit is a species of bird in the Paridae family. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and dry savanna.
Acadian chickadee - The Boreal Chickadee is a small passerine bird in the tit family Paridae.
Acadian Flycatcher - Adults have olive upperparts, darker on the wings and tail, with whitish underparts; they have a white eye ring, white wing bars and a wide bill. The breast is washed with olive. The upper part of the bill is dark; the lower part is yellowish.
Acanthiza apicalis - The Inland Thornbill , commonly called the Broad-tailed Thornbill, is a small, insect-eating bird of Australia. The Inland Thornbill is commonly confused with the coastal Brown Thornbill due to its similar colorations :
Acorn woodpecker - The adult has a black head, back, wings and tail, white forehead, throat, belly and rump. The eyes are white. The adult male has a red cap starting at the forehead, whereas females have a black area between the forehead and the cap. The white neck, throat and forehead patches are distinctive identifiers.
Acrocephalus luscinius - The species is approximately 17 cm long, and is greyish olive-brown above with a pale-yellow underside. It inhabits wetlands, thickets and the margins of forests. The female is slightly smaller than the male. Both sexes have a long bill compared to other reed warbler species.
Acrocephalus orinus - This species has the upper plumage and visible portions of wings and tail olive-brown while the underside is pale creamy with the underwing and axillaries paler.
Acrocephalus rodericanus - The Rodrigues Warbler is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found only on Rodrigues, which belongs to Mauritius. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, and plantations . It is threatened by habitat loss.
Acrocephalus sechellensis - The Seychelles Warbler , also known as Seychelles Brush-warbler, is a small songbird found on four granitic and corraline islands in the Seychelles. It is a greenish-brown bird with long legs and a long slender bill. It is primarily found in forested areas on the islands. The Seychelles Warbler is a rarity in that it exhibits cooperative breeding, or alloparenting; which means that the monogamous pair is assisted by nonbreeding female helpers.
Acrocephalus tangorum - The Manchurian Reed-warbler is a species of marsh-warbler . It was formerly included in the "Old World warbler" assemblage, and was usually treated as a subspecies of the Paddyfield Warbler .
Adalbert's Eagle - The Spanish Imperial Eagle is closely related to the Eastern Imperial Eagle . It occurs only in central and south-west Spain, Portugal and possibly northern Morocco. Formerly , the Spanish Imperial Eagle was considered to be a subspecies of the Eastern Imperial Eagle, but is now widely recognised as a separate species due to differences in morphology , ecology , and molecular characteristics .
Adamawa Turtle-Dove - In 2004, the Adamawa Turtle-dove was assessed by BirdLife International as qualifying for Red List endangered status, though it was given a low risk rating.
Adelaide's warbler - Dendroica adelaidae was originally considered a single species, D. adelaidae, with three populations occurring in Barbuda, Puerto Rico and St. Lucia. Each of these populations were regarded as a subspecies, Da.
Adelbert Bowerbird - Its diet consists mainly of figs, ants and insects. The bower itself is that of "avenue"-type with two sides of wall of sticks.
Adelie Penguin - The Adélie Penguin is one of three species in the genus Pygoscelis. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA evidence suggests the genus split from other penguins around 38 million years ago, about 2 million years after the ancestors of the genus Aptenodytes. In turn, the Adélie penguins split off from the other members of the genus around 19 million years ago.
Admiralty Islands Hawk Owl - This species is endemic to Manus Island, in the Admiralty Islands. It lives mainly in forests, but will appear in trees humans, and will sometimes occupy riparian habitats. It is fairly common throughout its limited range.
Aegotheles tatei - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Aethopyga primigenia - The Grey-hooded Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is endemic to the Philippines.
African Bare-eyed Thrush - The African Bare-eyed Thrush is a species of bird in the Turdidae family. It is found in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, and Tanzania. Its natural habitats are dry savanna and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
African Barred Owlet - The species is most frequently found in woodland and forests, and on forest edges. It may also occur in more open savannah and along rivers. It is partly diurnal, and feeds mostly on insects, although small rodents and birds may also be eaten.
African Black Cuckoo Shrike - The Black Cuckoo-shrike is a species of bird in the Campephagidae family. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, dry savanna, and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
African Black Duck - The African Black Duck is an entirely black duck with white marks on its back. It lives in central and southern Africa.It is also known as the black river duck, or West African black duck or Ethiopian black duck.
African Black Oystercatcher - The African Black Oystercatcher is a large and noisy plover-like bird, with completely black plumage, red legs and a strong broad red bill used for smashing or prying open molluscs such as mussels, or for finding earthworms. The sexes are similar in appearance, but juveniles are browner than adults.
African Black Swift - The nominate South African subspecies is migratory, wintering further north. Other subspecies are resident. Of the other seven accepted forms, the most widespread is the small dark A. b. roehli of east Africa. Two other dark races, A. b. balstoni and A. b. mayottensis, are restricted to Madagascar and the Comoro Islands respectively. It has been suggested that some balstoni migrate to the continental mainland when not breeding, but this has not been proved.
African Black-headed Oriole - It breeds in much of sub-Saharan Africa from Sudan and Ethiopia in the north to South Africa in the south.
African Blue-Flycatcher - It is found in Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, and Uganda.
African Citril Finch - La Palisse Hotel, Kigali, Rwanda
African Collared Dove - This bird is typically around 26 cm in length. Its upper body, from shoulders to tail, is a pale grayish brown, though the wing edge has a bluish tinge. Flight feathers are darker, and nearly black. Head, neck and breast are pinkish shading to white on the chin and belly. There is little sexual dimorphism.
African Crake - It is relatively well studied, being common and less skulking than other African rails.
African Cuckoo - The African Cuckoo is a species of cuckoo in the Cuculidae family. It is found in Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
African Cuckoo-Falcon - It is a mostly solitary and skulking bird, flying between trees in short glides with wings held high, swooping up at end of glide and perching. It is usually found hunting in grass and low vegetation, remaining still for a while and then moving to a new spot. Its diet consists mainly of insects, with a preference for grasshoppers, but also takes small snakes and lizards, as well as birds and rodents.
African Darter - The African Darter , sometimes called the Snakebird, is a water bird of tropical sub-Saharan Africa.
African Dusky Flycatcher - The African Dusky Flycatcher is 13 cm long and weighs around 11 gm. Its upperparts are plain brown, with the only facial marking being an indistinct narrow eye-ring. The chin is plain pale grey, and the rest of the underparts are grey-brown with indistinct streaks. The short, straight, laterally flattened bill is black, the legs and feet are grey, and the eyes are brown. The sexes are similar, but the juvenile is spotted with buff above, and is whitish spotted with brown below.
African Dusky Nightjar - The Fiery-necked Nightjar is a species of nightjar in the Caprimulgidae family. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
African Dwarf Kingfisher - The African Dwarf Kingfisher is a species of bird in the Alcedinidae family. It is found in Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Sudan, and Uganda. This is the world's smallest kingfisher, at 9 grams and 10 cm.
African Finfoot - The African Finfoot is an underwater specialist with a long neck, a striking sharp beak, and bright red, lobed feet. The plumage varies by race, generally pale underneath and darker on top. The males are usually darker than the females. It resembles greatly South America's Torrent Duck, a clear example of convergent evolution.
African Firefinch - It is found in Angola, Benin, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, the Republic of Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Gabon, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The status of the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
African Fish Eagle - Its closest relative appears to be the critically endangered Madagascar Fish-eagle . Like all sea-eagle species pairs, this one consists of a white-headed species and a tan-headed one. These are an ancient lineage of sea-eagles, and as such have dark talons, beaks, and eyes . Both species have at least partially white tails even as juveniles.
African Forest-Flycatcher - The African Forest-flycatcher is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Angola, Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. References
African Golden Oriole - It is a bird of thick bush and other well-wooded areas. The hanging basket-shaped nest is built in a tree, and contains two eggs. The food is insects and fruit, especially figs, found in the tree canopies where the orioles spend much of their time.
African Goshawk - Specie is able to hunt lions and hippos as is a large raptor
African Green Pigeon - Feeding on fruit in a tree
African Grey Hornbill - The African Grey Hornbill is a widespread and common resident breeder in much of sub-Saharan Africa and into Arabia.
African Hawk-Eagle - The African Hawk Eagle breeds in tropical Sub-Saharan Africa. It is a bird of wooded hills, building a stick nest about 3 feet in diameter in the fork of a large tree. The clutch is generally one or two eggs.
African Jacana - These are conspicuous and unmistakable birds. They are 30cm long,but the females are larger than the males. They have chestnut upperparts with black wingtips,rear neck and eyestripe. The underparts are white,with a chestnut belly patch in adult birds. The blue bill extends up as a coot-like head shield,and the legs and very long toes are grey.
African Marsh Harrier - The adult is 45 to 50 cm long and is mostly brown with pale streaking on the head, breast and forewing and rufous on the thighs and belly. Males and females are similar, unlike most harriers. The juvenile is dark brown with a pale breastband and pale markings on the head. The tail and flight feathers have dark barring at all ages. It is usually silent but has a high-pitched, two-note display call.
African Masked-Weaver - This weaver is very widespread and found in a wide range of habitats, including shrubland, savanna, grassland, open woodland, inland wetlands and semi-desert areas. It also occurs in suburban gardens and parks.
African Mountain Buzzard - At 45-50 cm, it is smaller than the Steppe Buzzard and darker brown, with less rufous above.
African Olive Pigeon - This is a species of cool, moist forest canopies above 1,400 m altitude, although it occurs locally as low as 700 m. It will use mountain fynbos, second growth and clearings, and feed on agricultural land when not persecuted.
African Open-billed Stork - The African Openbill is a species of stork in the Ciconiidae family. It is found in Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
African Palm Swift - It is a common resident breeder in tropical Africa. The down and feather nest is glued to the underside of a palm leaf with saliva, which is also used to secure the usually two eggs. This is a fast flying bird of open country, which is strongly associated with Oil Palms.
African Paradise Flycatcher - The African Paradise Flycatcher is a common resident breeder in Africa south of the Sahara Desert. This species is usually found in open forests and savannah habitats. Two or three eggs are laid in a tiny cup nest in a tree.
African Penduline-Tit - The race A. c. sylviella, found in parts of Kenya and Tanzania, is sometimes regarded as a separate species, the Buff-bellied Penduline-tit.
African Pied Hornbill - African Pied Hornbill is a common resident breeder in much of equatorial Africa from The Gambia to western Uganda and northern Angola. It eats insects, small reptiles and frogs. This is a bird mainly of forest habitats. The female lays up to four white eggs in a tree hole, which is blocked off during incubation with a cement made of mud, droppings and fruit pulp. There is only one narrow aperture, just big enough for the male to transfer food to the mother and the chicks.
African Pied Starling - The adult of this 27–28 cm long starling has mainly dully glossed black plumage except for a white lower belly and undertail. It has a white iris and yellow lower mandible. The sexes are alike, but the juvenile has unglossed plumage, a brown iris and a dull yellow lower mandible. There are no subspecies. This species has a number of calls, but the most familiar is a skeer kerrra kerrra. There is also a soft warbling song.
African Pitta - The African Pitta, Pitta angolensis, is a species of bird in the Pittidae family. It is found in Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
African Pygmy Falcon - Adult African Pygmy-falcons are white below and on the face, grey above, the female having a chestnut back. There are white "eye spots" on the nape. Juveniles have a brown back, duller than adult females, and a rufous wash on the breast. The flight feathers of the wings are spotted black and white ; the tail is barred black and white.
African Quailfinch - It is found in Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia & Zimbabwe. The status of the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
African Rail - Its breeding habitat is marshes and reedbeds across eastern and southern Africa from Ethiopia to South Africa. Many birds are permanent residents, but some undertake seasonal movements in response to the availability of wetland.
African Red-tailed Buzzard - The Red-necked Buzzard is a species of bird of prey in the Accipitridae family. It is found in Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Togo, and Uganda.
African River Martin - It breeds along the Congo River and its tributary, the Ubangi. It nests in burrows in sand banks, and appears to be common common within its restricted range, despite being caught in large numbers by the local population for food. It is migratory, wintering in coastal savannah in southern Gabon and the Republic of Congo. Many birds remain to breed in the wintering zones. This martin feeds on insects caught in the air and frequently walks on the ground rather than perching in trees. Due to a lack of detailed information about its population numbers, this species is classed as Data Deficient by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
African Scops-Owl - The African Scops Owl has a distinctive "prrrp" call which occurs around every 5 seconds:
African Silverbill - In early literature, African Silverbill Lonchura cantans and Indian Silverbill L. malabarica were treated as conspecific. In 1943, Jean Théodore Delacour firmly made the both species synonymous in his revision of the Estrildinae. However, in 1964, James M. Harrison first studied the two in a strictly comparative manner and concluded that they were two separate species. He discovered that although the call notes were similar, the songs are distinctly different in form, but sharing a common pattern. The are sympatric in the south of the Arabian Peninsula and there is no record of natural hybridization. From Harrison's personal observation of birds in captivity, each of the two forms evinced a preference for its own kind. In 1985, Kakizawa and Watada confirmed Harrison's conclusion. They confirmed the genetic difference of the two species by the means of protein electrophoresis. In 1990, Sibley and Monroe accept the two as distinct species.
African Skimmer - They have very long wings. The back, hindneck, and crown are black. The forehead and rest of the body is white, with a bright, long, orange beak that ends with a yellow tip. Their short forked tail is white, and their legs are bright red. The average size is about 15 inches long. Their voice is a sharp "kip-kip". Their bill structure is unique. The lower mandible is much longer than the upper mandible, and flattened sideways like scissor blades.
African Snipe - This 30-32 cm long snipe has a stocky body and relatively short legs for a wader. Its upperparts, head and neck are streaked and patterned with bold dark brown stripes and gold edges to the feathers forming lines down its back.. The belly is white, with some brown barring on the flanks but never on the belly. The pinkish-brown bill is very long, straight and fairly robust. The legs and feet are yellowish-olive to greenish-grey. The sexes are similar, and immatures differ only in showing pale fringes on the wing coverts.
African Spoonbill - The African Spoonbill occurs in marshy wetlands with some open shallow water, nesting in colonies in trees or reedbeds. It does not usually share colonies with storks or herons. Usually two to four eggs are laid.
African Thrush - African Thrushes are omnivorous, eating a wide range of insects, earthworms and berries. They nest in bushes or similar. They do not form flocks.
African Wood Owl - The African Wood Owl, Strix woodfordii, is a medium-sized owl with dark eyes and no ear tufts. It is 30 to 36 cm long and weighs from 240 to 350 grams. It lives in Africa from Senegambia to Sudan and south to Angola, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, and on the east coast to South Africa. It lives mainly in forest and woodland though it sometimes inhabits plantations. It eats mostly insects but will also eat reptiles, small mammals, and other birds. It breeds from July to October and lays 1 to 3 eggs in a hollow in a tree. It will then incubate the eggs for about 31 days. Five weeks after the eggs hatch, the young will leave the nest and can fly 2 weeks later. The young will remain with the parents for about four months and will sometimes stay till the next breeding season. Its call is a loud series of fast hoots. It is not threatened and is common in almost all of its range.
African Wood Pigeon - Like many other pigeons, it mainly feeds on grain and seeds.
African Yellow White-eye - It is found in Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Agami Heron - It is sometimes known as the Chestnut-bellied Heron, and is the only member of the genus Agamia .
Agile Tit-Tyrant - The Agile Tit-Tyrant is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It has been placed in the genus Uromyias, which formerly was recognized based on syringial and plumage characters, but now is known to be imbedded within Anairetes. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Venezuela.
Aglaiocercus berlepschi - The male is 22 centimetres in length with the elongated outer tail-feathers accounting for 14-15 centimetres. Its plumage is mostly irridescent green. The throat is blue and the outer tail-feathers are violet, becoming blue towards the tips. The female is 9.5-11 centimetres long. The tail is shorter than that of the male but still fairly long and slightly forked. Females have a blue crown and white throat, breast and belly.
Ahanta Francolin - The Ahanta Francolin is a species of bird in the Phasianidae family. It is found in Benin, Ivory Coast, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Togo. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Akekee - The ʻAkekeʻe is a greenish-yellow bird with a black mask around the eye and a bluish bill, unlike the ʻĀkepa, which is usually red, canary-yellow or orange, without black, and have horn-colored bills. Their bill-tips are crossed over, though not bent as in distantly-related Fringillidae the crossbills . The ʻAkekeʻe's call is softer than its relatives.
Akepa - All 'Akepa have an unusual cross-bill. When closed, the upper bill tip overlaps either to the right or left of the lower bill tip; this small overlap cannot be seen in the field. When opening the bill, as in prying open leaf buds on native Ohia trees to extract arthropod prey, the bill swings sideways, and this is easily seen in the hand. The Akepa uses this bill in a similar fashion to the North American Crossbills . This species is usually found above 1,100 meters up to 2,200 meters above sea level. 'Akepa are often found in small groups, including displays by multiple males, and in mixed-species flocks during the non-breeding season.
Akiapolaau - The ʻAkiapōlāʻau is a species of finch in the Hawaiian honeycreeper subfamily, Drepanididae, that is endemic to the island of Hawaii. Its natural habitats are dry and montane moist forests, and the only bird species on the island to occupy the woodpecker niche.
Akun Eagle Owl - The Akun Eagle-owl is a species of owl in the Strigidae family. It is found in forests in Central and Western Africa. At 43 centimetres , it is the smallest eagle-owl in Africa and also the only African rainforest eagle-owl with yellow eyes.
Alae keokeo - The American Coot is a bird of the family Rallidae, inhabiting wetlands and open water bodies. About 16 inches in length and weighing 1.4 lb , adults have a short thick white bill and white frontal shield, which usually has a reddish-brown spot near the top of the bill between the eyes. From up close, a dark band can be distinguished at the billtip. The body is grey with the head and neck darker than the rest of the body. Their legs are yellowish, with scalloped toes rather than webbed feet. Their chicks have black bodies with bright red head and beak, and orange plumes around the neck. The call is a high-pitched squeaking honk somewhat like a goose's but more hollow sounding.
Alagoas Curassow - The rare Alagoas Curassow was first mentioned by German naturalist Georg Marcgraf in his work Historia Naturalis Brasiliae which was published in 1648. Because of lack of information and specimen, it was considered the same species with the Razor-billed Curassow, until after its rediscovery in 1951 in the Alagoas lowland forests, Brazil. Following the review of Pereira & Baker , they are today believed to be a fairly basal lineage of its genus and closer to the Crestless Curassow, the other Mitu species with brown eumelanin in the tail tips. Its lineage is distinct since the Miocene-Pliocene boundary , when it became isolated in the Mata Atlântica refugium .
Alagoas Foliage-gleaner - This species was first discovered in 1979 at Murici in Alagoas, although there have been few sightings in that area since. In 2003 it was discovered at the Frei Caneca Private Reserve in Pernambuco. Due to its rarity it has been classified by BirdLife International as critically endangered. The current population is estimated at between 50 and 249.
Alala - The ʻalalā is now extinct in the wild. Prior to this, the species was found only in the western and southeastern parts of the island of Hawaiʻi.
Alaotra Grebe - This species declined in the course of the 20th century, mainly due to habitat destruction and predation by introduced snakehead murrel . Also, the few remaining birds increasingly hybridized with Little Grebes which use the wetlands as a migration stopover site; as the species differed in several key aspects, the hybrid birds may have suffered from decreased fitness, to the detriment of the rufolavatus gene pool.
Alaska chickadee - The Siberian Tit or Gray-headed Chickadee is a passerine bird in the tit family Paridae. It is a widespread resident breeder throughout subarctic Scandinavia and northern Asia, and also into North America in Alaska and the far northwest of Canada. It is a conifer specialist. It is resident, and most birds do not migrate.
Albert's Lyrebird - The rarer of the two species of lyrebirds, the Albert's Lyrebird lacks the elegant lyre-shaped tail feathers of the Superb Lyrebird. It also builds platforms by trampling down dense vegetation for courtship display instead of scratch up mounds. The diet consists mainly of insects found on forest floor and from rotting logs.
Alcippe grotei - It is often considered conspecific with the Mountain Fulvetta, Alcippe peracensis, but the two forms differ in morphology and vocalisations, and are separated altitudinally. Black-browed Fulvetta occurs primarily below 400 m, and Mountain Fulvetta above 900 m.
Aldabra Drongo - The appearance of this species is typical for drongos, with entirely black plumage, a heavy bill and a red eye. The tail is long and forked. Juvenile birds have a grey back, lighter blotched undersides and a brown eye. Its call is a harsh chuckle.
Aldabra Warbler - The Aldabra Brush Warbler was an extinct bird in the acrocephalid warbler family. It was endemic to the atoll of Aldabra in the Seychelles.
Alectroenas rodericana - The Rodrigues Grey Pigeon is an extinct species of pigeon formerly endemic to the Mascarene island of Rodrigues. It is known from a subfossil sternum and some other bones, and the descriptions of Leguat and Julien Tafforet . It was a bird the size of a Tambourine Dove and colored slate grey. Leguat and his companions took a fancy to these tame and confiding birds and had several dozen birds attending their outdoor table at mealtime to wait for scraps; they were especially fond of melon seeds. In 1693, the bird was found foraging on the island, but nested only on offshore islets which the rats that had been introduced at some time in the 17th century had not yet reached.
Aleutian tern - The Aleutian Tern is a seabird of the tern family Sternidae.
Alexandra - The Princess Parrot is a medium sized parrot, 34 to 46 cms long. The plumage is mostly green with a pink throat, bluish crown, and bright green shoulders. The rump is blue and the tail is long and narrow. The males have longer tail feathers and brighter coloring than females. The male also has a coral-red beak, while the female's is duller and has a greyish crown. Another difference is that the male has an orange iris, while the female's is much browner. In addition, the male of the species has a longer, projecting extension from the end of the 3rd primary feather on each side. This projection is called a 'spatula' or 'spatule". It appears in mature male birds.
Alexandrine Parakeet - The species name eupatria has its origins from Latin and/or could be a Greco-Latin combination. Where the prefix eu translates into good or noble and the suffix patria is a Latin word translating into fatherland or ancestry. Consequently, the scientific name means of noble fatherland or of noble ancestry.
Algerian Nuthatch - The Algerian Nuthatch is a resident bird of four areas of mountain forest in northeast Algeria. Its range is limited by the availability of woodland, and it occurs only above 1000m, with the population density increasing with altitude.
Alipiopsitta xanthops - The Yellow-faced Parrot , also known as the Yellow-faced Amazon, is the only species of the genus Alipiopsitta. It is a semi-nomadic species found in the cerrado region of Brazil and adjacent Bolivia. It occurs in small numbers and is declining or has already disappeared in large areas of its former range.
Allen - Its breeding habitat is marshes and lakes in sub-Saharan Africa. They build a floating nest in marshes and swamps, laying 2-5 eggs. This species is partially migratory, undertaking seasonal movements.
Allen's hummingbird - The Allen's Hummingbird is common only in the brushy woods, gardens, and meadows of coastal California from Santa Barbara north, and a minuscule portion of lower Oregon. The nominate race of Allen's Hummingbird Ss.
Allied - It nowadays contains 5 accepted subspecies, with mtDNA cytochrome b sequence data indicating that the North Atlantic Little Shearwater is closer to Audubon's Shearwater , and myrtae being closer to the Hawaiian and possibly Townsend's Shearwater . Heinroth's Shearwater was also sometimes considered a subspecies of this bird; the relationship between the Little and Audubon's Shearwater is probably not as close as long believed .
Allied Nightjar - The Savanna Nightjar, Caprimulgus affinis, is a species of nightjar found in South Asia, usually in the Philippines.
Alpine Accentor - It is a bird of bare mountain areas with some low vegetation. It builds a neat nest low in a bush or rock crevice, laying 3-5 unspotted sky-blue eggs.
Alpine Chough - This bird has glossy black plumage, a yellow bill, red legs, and distinctive calls. It has a buoyant acrobatic flight with widely spread flight feathers. The Alpine Chough pairs for life and displays fidelity to its breeding site, which is usually a cave or crevice in a cliff face. It builds a lined stick nest and lays three to five brown-blotched whitish eggs. It feeds, usually in flocks, on short grazed grassland, taking mainly invertebrate prey in summer and fruit in winter; it will readily approach tourist sites to find supplementary food.
Alpine Munia - It is found in subtropical/ tropical high altitude grassland habitat. The status of the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
Alpine Robin - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Alpine Swift - These birds have very short legs which they use only for clinging to vertical surfaces. The scientific name comes from the Ancient Greek απους, apous, meaning "without feet". They never settle voluntarily on the ground.
Alseonax - Cassin's Flycatcher or Cassin's Alseonax is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Angola, Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Togo, Uganda, and Zambia. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical swamps.
Altai Snowcock - The Altai Snowcock is a species of bird in the Phasianidae family. It is found in China, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, and Russia. Its natural habitat is boreal forests.
Altamira oriole - At 25 cm and 56 grams, this is the largest oriole of the Icterus genus. This bird nests in open woodlands. The nest is a very long woven pouch, attached to the end of a horizontal tree branch, sometimes to telephone wires.
Amami Woodcock - This species is a Restricted-range endemic found only in forests on two small islands of the Amami Islands chain in South Japan. Insofar as its habits are known, they are similar to Eurasian Woodcock.
Amazilia Hummingbird - The Amazilia Hummingbird occurs in western Peru and Ecuador. It is generally common, and can regularly be seen even in major cities such as Lima and Guayaquil. It prefers dry, open or semi-open habitats, but also occurs in forest. In its range it is easily recognized by the combination of a black-tipped red bill and mainly rufous underparts.
Amazon Kingfisher - This large kingfisher breeds by streams. The unlined nest is in a horizontal tunnel made in a river bank, and up to 1.6 m long and 10 cm wide. The female lays three, sometimes four, white eggs.
Amazon Tern - The Yellow-billed Tern is a species of tern in the Sternidae family. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are rivers, swamps, and freshwater lakes.
Amazonian Antpitta - The Amazonian Antpitta is a species of bird in the Formicariidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Amazonian Antshrike - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical swamps.
Amazonian Black Tyrant - The Amazonian Black-tyrant is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical swamps.
Amazonian Parrotlet - It is little known, but considered near threatened. It eats primarily seeds and fruit and seems to nest in bromeliads or other epiphytes. Flocks are small, under 20 individuals.
Amazonian Pygmy-Owl - The Amazonian Pygmy-owl Glaucidium hardyi is an owl found in northern South America and northern Brazil, in the center of the Amazon Basin, and in Venezuela and the Guianas. In the southwest of the basin bordering the Andes cordillera, the species is found in Peru, and Bolivia. In the Guyanas, the range is bifurcated, as the species is not found in the middle country of Suriname.
Amazonian Streaked-antwren - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical swamps.
Amazonian swift - The Amazonian Swift is a species of swift in the Apodidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Amazonian tyrannulet - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and heavily degraded former forest.
Ambon White-eye - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, and rural gardens. It is threatened by habitat loss.
American Avocet - This avocet has long, thin, gray legs, giving it its colloquial name, "blue shanks". The plumage is black and white on the back with white on the underbelly. The neck and head are cinnamon colored in the summer and gray in the winter. The long, thin bill is upturned at the end. The adult is about 45 cm tall.
American Bittern - The American Bittern is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae.
American Black Oystercatcher - The American Black Oystercatcher is the only representative of the oystercatcher family over most of its range, overlapping slightly with the American Oystercatcher on the coast of Baja California. Within its range it is most commonly referred to as the Black Oystercatcher, although this name is also used locally for the Blackish Oystercatcher and the African Black Oystercatcher. Its scientific name is derived by John James Audubon from that of his friend John Bachman.
American Black Vulture - The Black Vulture, Coragyps atratus, also known as the American Black Vulture, is a bird in the New World vulture family whose range extends from the southeastern United States to Central Chile and Uruguay in South America. Although a common and widespread species, it has a somewhat more restricted distribution than its compatriot, the Turkey Vulture, which breeds well into Canada and south to Tierra del Fuego. Despite the similar name and appearance, this species is unrelated to the Eurasian Black Vulture. The latter species is an Old World vulture in the family Accipitridae , whereas the American species is a New World vulture. It is the only extant member of the genus Coragyps, which is in the family Cathartidae. It inhabits relatively open areas which provide scattered forests or shrublands. With a wingspan of 1.5 m the Black Vulture is a large bird though relatively small for a vulture. It has black plumage, a featherless, grayish-black head and neck, and a short, hooked beak.
American Cliff Swallow - The Cliff Swallow is a member of the passerine bird family Hirundinidae — the swallows and martins.
American Crossbill - This crossbill is mainly resident, but will regularly irrupt south if its food source fails. This species will form flocks outside the breeding season, often mixed with other crossbills.
American Crow - It is one of several species of corvid that are entirely black, though it can be distinguished from the other two such birds in its range—from the Common Raven by size and behavior and from the Fish Crow by call .
American egret - The Great Egret , also known as the Great White Egret or Common Egret or Great White Heron, and called kōtuku in New Zealand, is a large egret. Distributed across most of the tropical and warmer temperate regions of the world, in southern Europe and Asia it is rather localized. In North America it is more widely distributed, and it is ubiquitous across the sun-belt of the United States and in the rain forests of South America. It is sometimes confused with the Great White Heron in Florida, which is a white morph of the closely related Great Blue Heron . Note however that the name Great White Heron has occasionally been used to refer to the Great Egret.
American flamingo - The American Flamingo breeds in the Galápagos Islands, coastal Colombia, Venezuela and nearby islands, besides the Guyanas and Cape Orange in Brazil. It also breeds in the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico, and in the northern Caribbean in the Bahamas, Hispaniola, Cuba and the Turks and Caicos Islands. Most sightings in southern Florida are usually considered to be escapees, although at least one bird banded as a chick in the Yucatán Peninsula has been sighted in Everglades National Park, and others may be genuine wanderers from Cuba.
American golden plover - The American Golden Plover is a medium-sized plover.
American Goldfinch - The American Goldfinch , also known as the Eastern Goldfinch and Wild Canary, is a North American bird in the finch family. It is migratory, ranging from southern Canada to North Carolina during the breeding season, and from just south of the Canadian border to Mexico during the winter.
American lanner falcon - The Prairie Falcon is a medium-sized falcon of western North America.
American merganser - The Common Merganser or Goosander Mergus merganser is a large duck, of rivers and lakes of forested areas of Europe, northern and central Asia, and North America. It eats fish and nests in holes in trees.
American Oystercatcher - The American Oystercatcher is found on the Atlantic coast of North America from New England to northern Florida, where it is also found on the Gulf coast, and south to northern South America. It is found also in the Pacific coast of Mexico, Central America and northern South America. In the 1800s they became locally extinct in the northeast due to market hunting and egg collecting. After receiving protection under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, their range extended northward to re-occupy historical habitat in New England.
American Painted-snipe - The South American Painted Snipe or Lesser Painted Snipe, Nycticryphes semicollaris, is a shorebird in the family Rostratulidae. There are two other species in its family, the Australian Painted Snipe and the Greater Painted Snipe.
American Pipit - The Buff-bellied Pipit is a small songbird found on both sides of the northern Pacific. It was first described by Marmaduke Tunstall in his 1771 Ornithologia Britannica.
American Purple Gallinule - This medium-sized rail is unmistakable, with its huge yellow feet, purple-blue plumage with a green back, and red and yellow bill. It has a pale blue forehead shield and white undertail.
American Pygmy Kingfisher - This tiny kingfisher occurs in dense forests and mangroves along small streams or rivers with heavily vegetated banks. The unlined nest is in a horizontal tunnel up to 40 cm long made in a river bank, earth heap, or occasionally an arboreal termite nest. The female lays three, sometimes four, white eggs.
American Redstart - These birds are migratory, wintering in Central America, the West Indies, and northern South America . They are very rare vagrants to western Europe.
American snipe - Capella gallinago
American Sparrow Hawk - The American Kestrel is a small falcon. This bird was colloquially known in North America as the "Sparrow Hawk". This name is misleading because it implies a connection with the Eurasian Sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus, which is unrelated; the latter is an accipiter rather than a falcon. Though both are diurnal raptors, they are only distantly related.
American three-toed woodpecker - This woodpecker has a length of 21 cm and a wingspan of 38 cm and closely resembles the Black-backed Woodpecker, which is also three-toed. Until recently, it was considered to be the same species as the Eurasian Three-toed Woodpecker, . Adults are black on the head, wings and rump, and white from the throat to the belly; the flanks are white with black bars. The back is white with black bars and the tail is black with the white outer feathers barred with black. The adult male has a yellow cap.
American Tree Sparrow - The American Tree Sparrow, Spizella arborea, is a medium-sized sparrow.
American White Pelican - The American White Pelican is a large aquatic bird from the order Pelecaniformes. It breeds in interior North America, moving south and to the coasts, as far as Central America, in winter.
American Wigeon / Baldpate - The American Wigeon , Anas americana is a species of wigeon in the dabbling duck genus Anas. If this is split up, all wigeons will go into their old genus Mareca again. It is a common and widespread duck which breeds in all but the extreme north of Canada and Alaska and also in the Interior West through Idaho, Colorado, the Dakotas, and Minnesota, as well as eastern Washington and Oregon.
Amethyst Brown-Dove - It is endemic to the Philippines. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Amethyst Woodstar - The Amazon Woodstar's natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Amethyst-throated Hummingbird - The Amethyst-Throated Hummingbird is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Amethyst-throated Sunangel - It is found in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Ammomanes cinctura - The Bar-tailed Lark is a species of lark in the Alaudidae family. It is found in Afghanistan, Algeria, Cape Verde, Chad, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel and Palestine, Italy, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Western Sahara, and Yemen. Its natural habitat is hot deserts.
Amsterdam Island Albatross - The Amsterdam Albatross or Amsterdam Island Albatross,
Anambra Waxbill - Anambra Waxbill is approximately 12 cm long. This species is a dun-coloured finch with reddish brown bill and rump. At closer look, it will give a very fine barring on upperparts, sides of breast and flanks, with unusual pale eyes. It has a typical waxbill-like tzzzt call.
Ancash tapaculo - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland and rocky areas.
Anchieta's Barbet - It is found in Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Zambia.
Anchieta's Sunbird - The Anchieta's Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is found in Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, and Zambia, and is named after José Alberto de Oliveira Anchieta.
Ancient Murrelet - These birds breed in colonies, their two eggs are laid in burrows excavated in forest soil among tree roots, under logs or in grass tussocks, occasionally in rock crevices. These small auks arrive at and depart from their nesting grounds at night, presumably to reduce predation, and perhaps for the same reason the young are never fed at the nest, being taken to sea 1-3 days after hatching. The parents and young recognise one another by call and after the chicks have run from the burrow to the sea, they locate their parents by call and the entire family swims immediately out at sea. The family continues to move away from land for at least twelve hours. After that, the young are fed exclusively at sea by their parents for more than a month.
Andaman Crake - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and swamps. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Andaman Cuckoo Dove - It is endemic to India, but becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Andaman Drongo - The Andaman Drongo is 28–29 cm long, although the larger dicruriformis subspecies is 35 cm in length. It has a deeply forked tail and a heavy black bill. The plumage is black , and glossed with green. There is some sexual dimorphism, with the female being smaller and having a less forked tail.
Andaman Hawk Owl - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Andaman Scops Owl - The Andaman Scops Owl Otus balli is an owl native to the Andaman Islands.
Andaman Serpent Eagle - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Andaman Tree Pie - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Andaman Wood Pigeon - It is threatened by habitat loss.
Andaman Woodpecker - The Andaman Woodpecker is a species of bird in the Picidae family. It is endemic to the Andaman Islands in India. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Andean Avocet - This 43-48 cm long avocet has a white head, neck, underparts and rump, and dark brown back, wings and tail. The thin, grey legs are not as long as with other avocet species, but the long thin black bill is upturned at the end. The sexes are similar, and the juvenile plumage is undescribed.
Andean Cock-of-the-rock - The species exhibits marked sexual dimorphism; the male has a large disk-like crest and scarlet or brilliant orange plumage, while the female is significantly darker and browner. Gatherings of males compete for breeding females with each male displaying its colourful plumage, bobbing and hopping, and making a variety of calls. After mating, the female makes a nest under a rocky overhang, incubates the eggs, and rears the young, all by herself.
Andean Condor - It is a large black vulture with a ruff of white feathers surrounding the base of the neck and, especially in the male, large white patches on the wings. The head and neck are nearly featherless, and are a dull red color, which may flush and therefore change color in response to the bird's emotional state. In the male, there is a wattle on the neck and a large, dark red comb or caruncle on the crown of the head. Unlike most birds of prey, the male is larger than the female.
Andean Emerald - The Andean Emerald is a species of hummingbird found at forest edge, woodland, gardens and scrub in the Andes of Colombia, Ecuador and northern Peru. It is generally fairly common. It is green above and white below. Some subspecies have a blue crown.
Andean Flamingo - Like all flamingos it lays a single chalky white egg on a mud mound.
Andean Flicker - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland and pastureland.
Andean Goose - It is resident around lakes and marshes in the high Andes, usually well above 3000 m. It is largely terrestrial and avoids swimming except in emergencies.
Andean Guan - These are medium sized birds, about 16-20 in in length, long-bodied with thin necks and small heads, and similar in shape to turkeys but more elegant. The plumage is overall brown with whitish edging to the feathers of the head, neck and chest. It has a red dewlap and reddish legs.
Andean Gull - The Andean Gull is a species of gull in the Laridae family. As is the case with many gulls, it has traditionally been placed in the genus Larus. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitats are rivers, freshwater lakes, saline marshes, and pastureland.
Andean Hillstar - The Andean Hillstar is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found in grassland, scrub and woodland in the Altiplano of southern Peru, Bolivia, northern Chile, and north-western Argentina. It often includes the Green-headed Hillstar as a subspecies, but the male of that species has a black stripe to the central underparts, and its upperparts are greener.
Andean Lapwing - The Andean Lapwing is a species of bird in the Charadriidae family. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland, rivers, swamps, and pastureland.
Andean Negrito - The Andean Negrito is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, and Peru. Its natural habitats are freshwater lakes and saline marshes.
Andean Parakeet - Most flocks are small, but sometimes include over 300 individuals. The Andean Parakeet eats seeds, buds, and berries, and it breeds in burrows in steep banks.
Andean Potoo - The Andean Potoo is a species of bird in the Nyctibiidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Andean Pygmy Owl - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Andean Siskin - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland, subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland, and heavily degraded former forest.
Andean Slaty Thrush - It is found in north-west Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. The subspecies found in north-east Argentina, Paraguay and Brazil is often considered to be a separate species, the Eastern Slaty Thrush .
Andean Snipe - It is sometimes considered conspecific with the Fuegian Snipe, Gallinago stricklandii, which is also known as the Cordilleran Snipe. The scientific name of the Andean Snipe commemorates the Scottish botanist William Jameson.
Andean Solitaire - The Andean Solitaire is a species of bird in the Turdidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Andean Tinamou - The Andean Tinamou, Nothoprocta pentlandii, is a member of the most ancient groups of bird families, the Tinamous. The species is commonly found in high altitude shrubland, in the Andes of South America.
Andean Tit-Spinetail - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland, and subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.
Andean Tyrant - The Andean Tyrant is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru, it was also recently found in extreme south Ecuador. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Anderson's Bulbul - It is found in China, Hong Kong, Laos, Burma, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Angel Tern - The White Tern has 3-4 subspecies: the nominate race G. a. alba, G. a. leucopes, the Pacific White Tern . Additionally, the Little White Tern was long and often is still included herein as a subspecies G. a. microrhyncha.
Angola Batis - The Angola Batis is a species of bird in the Platysteiridae family. It is found in Angola, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Gabon. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests.
Angola Cave Chat - It is endemic to Angola. Its natural habitat is moist savanna, and it is somewhat rare due to habitat loss.
Angola Lark - The range of Mirafra angolensis is sizable, within Angola, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia. It is estimated to have a global Extent of Occurrence of about 170,000 square km.
Angolan Flycatcher - The Angola Slaty Flycatcher, Melaenornis brunneus , is a small passerine bird in the flycatcher family Muscicapidae. It is sometimes placed in the genus Dioptrornis instead of Melaenornis. As suggested by its common name, it is endemic to Angola.
Anhinga - Plotus anhinga Linnaeus, 1766
Anianiau - Species: Himatione parva Stejneger, 1887 Magumma parva Viridonia parva
Anjouan Brush-Warbler - The Anjouan Brush-Warbler is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found in Comoros and Mayotte.
Anjouan Scops-Owl - This species is a part of the larger grouping of owls known as typical owls, Strigidae, which contains most species of owl. The other grouping is the barn owls, Tytonidae.
Anjouan Sunbird - The Anjouan Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is endemic to Anjouan island in the Comoros. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Ankober Serin - The Ankober Serin is a species of finch in the Fringillidae family. It is found only in Ethiopia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland and arable land. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Anna's hummingbird - Anna's Hummingbird is 3.9 to 4.3 inches long. It has a bronze-green back, a pale grey chest and belly, and green flanks. Its bill is long, straight and slender. The adult male has an iridescent crimson-red crown and throat, and a dark, slightly forked tail. Anna's is the only North American hummingbird species with a red crown. Females and juveniles have a green crown, a grey throat with some red markings, a grey chest and belly, and a dark, rounded tail with white tips on the outer feathers.
Ansorge's Greenbul - The Ansorge's Greenbul is a species of songbird in the Pycnonotidae family. It is found in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Ant-chat - The Northern Anteater-chat is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Gambia, Kenya, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, and Tanzania. Its natural habitats are dry savanna, subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland, and subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.
Antarctic Petrel - The Antarctic Petrel is the only known species in the genus Thalassoica, and is a member of the Procellariidae family, and the Procellariiformes order. Also, this Petrel along with the Snow Petrel, the Cape Petrel, both Giant Petrels, and the two species in the Fulmarus family, are considered to be a separate group from the other Procellariidae members.
Antarctic Prion - Prion desolatus Procellaria desolata Gmelin, 1789
Antarctic Skua - The Brown Skua , also known as the Antarctic Skua, Southern Great Skua, Southern Skua, or Hākoakoa , is a seabird that breeds in the sub-Antarctic and Antarctic zones and moves further north when not breeding. Its taxonomy is highly complex and a matter of dispute, with some splitting it into two or three species: Falkland Skua , Tristan Skua , and Subantarctic Skua . To further confuse, it hybridizes with both the South Polar and Chilean Skuas, and the entire group have been considered subspecies of the Great Skua, a species otherwise restricted to the Northern Hemisphere. It feeds on fish , small mammals, scraps, chicks, eggs and carrion.
Antarctic Tern - Breeding takes place from mid-November to early December. Chicks hatch from December to February. Skuas and jaegers are the primary predators of this bird's eggs and young.
Anthornis melanocephala - In appearance it was very similar to the New Zealand Bellbird Anthornis melanura but was considerably larger. Also the whole of the head and neck was brightly glossed in purplish or steel-blue.
Antillean crested hummingbird - It is found in Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Montserrat, north-east Puerto Rico, Saba, Saint-Barthélemy, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Martin, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sint Eustatius, the British Virgin Islands and the US.
Antillean mango - The Antillean Mango is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found in the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Puerto Rico, the British Virgin Islands, and Virgin Islands, US.
Antillean nighthawk - The adults are dark with brown, grey and white patterning on the upperparts and breast; the long wings are black and show a white bar in flight. The tail is dark with white barring; the underparts are white with black bars. The adult male has a white throat; the female has a light brown throat. The most distinguishing characteristic to determine its identity from its closest relative the Common Nighthawk are the contrasting pale tertials near the back of the wings of a sitting bird. There are 2 color morphs, a gray and a rufous type.
Antillean Piculet - The Antillean Piculet occupies a number of different habitats within Hispaniola, including humid and dry Pinus and broadleaf forests, as well as semi-arid scrubland and thorn-forest. It will also occupy stands of mangrove forest and occasionally orchards and plantations. It occurs from sea-level to 1800 m, although in pine forests it is more common below 300 m. Within this habitat it prefers dense undergrowth.
Antillean Siskin - The Antillean Siskin is a species of finch in the Fringillidae family. It is found in the Dominican Republic and Haiti. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes and heavily degraded former forest.
Antioquia Bristle-Tyrant - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Apache wren - Adults are 11-13 cm long and weigh about 12 g. The subspecies vary greatly, with upperparts ranging from dull greyish-brown to rich rufescent-brown, and the underparts ranging from brown, over buff and pale grey, to pure white. All subspecies have blackish barring to the wings and tail, and some also to the flanks. All subspecies show a faint eye-ring and eye-brow and have a long, thin bill with a blackish upper mandible, and a black-tipped yellowish or pale grey lower mandible. The legs are pinkish or grey. The short tail is typically held cocked.
Apalharpactes mackloti - The Sumatran Trogon is a species of bird in the Trogonidae family. It was formerly considered conspecific with the Javan Trogon under the common name Blue-tailed Trogon.
Apalharpactes reinwardtii - The Javan Trogon is a species of bird in the Trogonidae family. The species was once lumped together with the Sumatran Trogon in a single species, the Blue-tailed Trogon, but differences in size, weight and plumage have led to the two being split. These two species were once themselves lumped with the rest of the Asian trogons in the genus Harpactes, but have been split into their own genus due to differences in plumage.
Apalis flavigularis - The Yellow-throated Apalis is a species of bird in the Cisticolidae family. It is endemic to Malawi.
Apalis lynesi - It is the only bird species endemic to Mozambique and is found only in the Mount Namuli massif in the north of the country where it was first discovered in 1932 by the English-born ornithologist Jack Vincent. There were no more records until an expedition rediscovered it in 1998. The bird is now known to be common in forest, forest edge and woodland patches above 1200 m. Logging of the forest is a potential threat but it appears to survive well in degraded and fragmented habitat.
Apapane - The bird is considered to be an active singer. The males are known for their singing patterns at all times of the day. They have six different calls and about ten different recorded song patterns. The contact call or song of a male ʻApapane is mainly used for mate attraction and breeding. The male who is most aggressive and sings the loudest is the one who wins the females' attention. Once courtship and pair formation has been established, and copulation is complete, both male and female ʻApapane are involved in the nesting process. The male role is important for maintaining courtship feeding during the nest construction and incubation period. The male ʻApapane sings continuously during incubation, while the female does not sing at all. His loud whistling, and chirping sound chases other male birds away from the nesting tree, while he sits on an adjacent perch guarding the nest. The ʻApapane has two distinct flight patterns: straight flight and a circling flight.
Aphanapteryx bonasia - The Red Rail or Red Hen of Mauritius, Aphanapteryx bonasia, is an extinct rail. It was only found on the island of Mauritius. The Red Rail, which today is only known from a large number of bones, some descriptions and a handful of drawings and paintings, was a flightless bird, somewhat larger than a chicken . Its plumage was reddish brown all over, and the feathers were fluffy and hairlike; the tail was not visible in the living bird and the short wings likewise also nearly disappeared in the plumage. It had a long, slightly curved, brown bill and comparatively long legs. Altogether, it resembled a lean kiwi more than a rail.
Aphanapteryx leguati - The Rodrigues Rail or Leguat's Gelinote is an extinct bird named after the learned traveller François Leguat, who came with a band of Huguenot religious refugees to Rodrigues in 1691 and stayed there for two years. It was also mentioned by Julien Tafforet in 1726. The Rodrigues Rail was a plump, flightless rail with bright gray plumage - probably an effect caused by fine grey and white mottling or vermiculations like on a mallard drake's flanks - and conspicuous redbill, feet and eye wattles. It was somewhat smaller than its relative, the Red Rail of Mauritius. The strong bill varied much in size and shape, some specimens having shorter and almost straight bills, others being much longer and prominently curved. It is unknown whether this related to sexual dimorphism or to individual variation or even to a genetic plasticity in bill shape and size that responds to differential food availability, as had been shown in some Darwin's finches. Leguat's account does suggest that he could not discern marked differenc
Apical Flycatcher - It is endemic to Colombia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and heavily degraded former forest.
Aplonis brunneicapillus - The White-eyed Starling is a species of starling in the Sturnidae family. It is found in Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical swamps. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Apolinar's Wren - This bird is small, with brown head, gray patches around the eyes, streaked dark back and reddish tail.
Apostlebird - Originally described by ornithologist John Gould in 1837, its specific epithet is Latin cinerea "grey".
Appert's Tetraka - Appert's Tetraka or Appert's Greenbul is a small passerine bird endemic to the south-west of Madagascar. The species was only described in 1972, and has been the subject of considerable taxonomic confusion. It was initially placed in the greenbul genus Phyllastrephus, and later with the Old World warblers in the genus Bernieria. Recent research indicates it is part of an endemic Malagasy radiation currently known as the Malagasy warblers .
Apricot-breasted Sunbird - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Apus balstoni - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Apus sladeniae - The Fernando Po Swift is a species of swift in the Apodidae family. It is found in Angola, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, and Nigeria.
Apus toulsoni - The Loanda Swift is a species of swift in the Apodidae family. It is found in Angola and Republic of the Congo.
Aquatic Warbler - This small passerine bird is a species found in wet sedge beds with vegetation shorter than 30 cm. Drainage has meant that this species has declined, and its stronghold is now the Polesie region of south Belarus, where 70% of the world's population breeds. 3-5 eggs are laid in a nest in low vegetation. This species is highly promiscuous, with most males and females having offspring with multiple partners .
Aquila hastata - The Indian Spotted Eagle is about 60 cm in length and has a wingspan of 150 cm. It is broad-headed, with the widest mouth of all spotted eagles. This species has a lighter coloration overall compared to its relatives, with a darker iris that makes the eyes appear darker than the plumage . Adults can be told apart from the Greater Spotted Eagle by its lighter color, darker eyes, and habitat preferences . Juveniles, unlike the Lesser and Greater species, are not strongly spotted at all, making the common name somewhat misleading, and also lack the creamy buff nape patch of the juvenile Lesser Spotted Eagle.
Ara atwoodi - Clark, the zoologist and binomial authority on the parrot, initially included these macaws in Ara guadeloupensis. On discovering Atwood's writings, however, Clark listed them separately, considering them distinct
Arabian Babbler - It is 26–29 cm long with a wingspan of 31-33.5 cm and a weight of 64-83 grams. It has a fairly long curved bill, a long tail, rounded wings and strong legs and feet. The plumage is grey-brown above, paler below. There are dark streaks on the back and the throat is whitish. It has a variety of calls including whistles, trills and chattering.
Arabian Bustard - It is also found in Iraq
Arabian Golden Sparrow - It is sometimes considered as a subspecies of the Sudan Golden Sparrow .
Arabian Waxbill - Arabian Waxbill is usually found in wetter land of southern Tihamah foothills and the terraced slopes and Wadis of the western escarpments in Yemen. It can also be found along the south coast of Yemen east to Wadi al-Jahr and, in the extensively irrigated intensive agricultural areas of Wadi Hadramawt between Shibam and Tarim, usually with a dense cover of trees and bushes. The altitude of its habitats is approximately 250 to 2,600 m.
Arabian Wheatear - The Arabian Wheatear is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Oman, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen.
Arabian Woodpecker - Though scientifically described by George Latimer Bates and Norman Boyd Kinnear, the scientific name was proposed by their occasional co-worker St. John Philby, after his wife Dora.
Araripe manakin - As typical of most manakins, males and females have a strong sexual dimorphism in the colors of the plumage. As in the Helmeted Manakin, it is a relatively large and long-tailed manakin, with a total length of c. 14.5 centimetres. The strikingly patterned males have a predominantely white plumage. With the exception of the white wing coverts, the wings are black as the tail. From the frontal tuft, over the crown, down to the middle back runs a carmine red patch. The iris is red. The females are mainly olive green and have pale green upperparts. They have a reduced olive green frontal tuft.
Aratinga labati - Jean-Baptiste Labat described a population of small parrots living on Guadeloupe, which have been postulated to be a separate species based on little evidence. The were called Conurus labati, and are now called the Guadeloupe Parakeet . There are no specimens or remains of the extinct parrots. Their taxonomy may never be fully elucidated, and so their postulated status as a separate species is hypothetical.
Archbold's Bowerbird - The Archbold's Bowerbird is distributed and endemic to highland forests of Western New Guinea. The male is polygamous and its bower yet to be discovered. The diet consists mainly of fruits.
Arctic Skua - This species breeds in the north of Eurasia and North America, with significant populations as far south as northern Scotland. It nests on dry tundra, higher fells and islands, laying up to four olive-brown eggs. It is usually silent except for newing and wailing notes while on the breeding grounds. Like other skuas, it will fly at the head of a human or fox approaching its nest. Although it cannot inflict serious damage, it is a frightening and painful experience. It is a migrant, wintering at sea in the tropics and southern oceans.
Arctic Tern - Arctic Terns are medium-sized birds. They have a length of 33–39 cm and a wingspan of 76–85 cm . They are mainly grey and white plumaged, with a red beak and feet, white forehead, a black nape and crown , and white cheeks. The grey mantle is 305 mm, and the scapulars are fringed brown, some tipped white. The upper wing is grey with a white leading edge, and the collar is completely white, as is the rump. The deeply forked tail is whitish, with grey outer webs. The hindcrown to the ear-coverts is black.
Arctic warbler - The nest is on the ground in a low shrub. Like most Old World warblers, this small passerine is insectivorous.
Arfak Astrapia - Levaillant of France described this bird as L’Incomparable or Incomparable Bird of Paradise.
Arfak Honeyeater - The Arfak Honeyeater is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is endemic to Indonesia.
Argentine Shoveller - The Red Shoveler is cinnamon in color with dark spots, and a green speculum. The head and neck are grayish. They have a large dark spatula shaped bill.
Arizona junco - Its range is primarily in Mexico, extending into some of the mountains of the southern tips of the US.
Arizona quail - These birds are easily recognized by their top knots and scaly plumage on their undersides. Gambel's quail have gray plumage on much of their bodies, and males have copper feathers on the top of their heads, black faces, and white stripes above their eyes. Gambel's quail can be commonly confused with California Quail due to similar plumage. They can usually be distinguished by range, but when this does not suffice, California quail have a more scaly appearance and the black patch on the lower breast of the male Gambel's Quail is absent in the California Quail. The two species are sister taxa which diverged during the Late Pliocene or Early Pleistocene, 1 to 2 mya .
Arizona Woodpecker - This species is known in older field guides as a subspecies of Strickland's Woodpecker. The 42nd supplement of the American Ornithologists Union checklist officially split Strickland's Woodpecker into two species: the northern population in the Sierra Madre Occidental region and the southern population in central Mexico .
Arkansas flycatcher - Adults are grey-olive on the upperparts with a grey head and a dark line through the eyes; the underparts are light becoming light orange-yellow on the lower breast and belly. They have a long black tail with white outer feathers. Western kingbirds also have a reddish crown that they only display during courtship and confrontations with other species.
Armenian Gull - Armenian Gulls are similar to Yellow-legged Gulls but are slightly smaller with a slightly darker grey back and dark eyes. The area of black on the wingtips is more extensive with smaller white spots. The bill is short with a distinctive black band just before the tip. First-winter birds are mainly brown. They have a whitish rump, pale inner primary feathers and a narrow, sharply-defined black band on the tail.
Arremon brunneinucha - The Chestnut-capped Brush-Finch, Arremon brunneinucha, is a passerine bird which breeds in highlands from central Mexico to southeastern Peru. Despite its name, it is not a true finch, but rather a member of the large Emberizidae family, which also includes buntings, American sparrows, juncos and towhees. Until recently, it was generally placed in the genus Buarremon, while it occasionally has been placed in Atlapetes.
Arremon castaneiceps - The Olive Finch is a species of bird in the Emberizidae family. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. Until recently, it was placed in the genus Lysurus.
Arremon torquatus - The Stripe-headed Brush-finch is a species of bird in the Emberizidae family. It is found in north-western Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and northern and western Venezuela. It is generally common in forest and dense second growth, mainly at altitudes of 2,000 to 3,000 metres , but locally it occurs far lower.
Arrow-marked Babbler - It is found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, dry savanna, and subtropical or tropical moist shrubland.
Ascension Frigatebird - It breeds on the rocky slopes of Boatswainbird. There may be of the order of 10,000 birds. As with other frigatebirds its movements when not breeding are little known because of identification problems within this difficult group, but it occurs off west Africa.
Ash's Lark - In the case of some lark species, as with Ash's Lark it is hard to describe definitively without having to compare its characters with those of some of its close relatives. It is insufficient to say only that it is a small lark that has greyish-brown upperparts with paler edging to its mantle feathers; and having buff-colored underbelly|underparts with brownish streaks, but a paler belly and vent; and with a light crest, and buff eyebrow-stripes.
Ash-breasted Antbird - The Ash-breasted Antbird is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It is found in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Ash-breasted Flycatcher - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Ash-breasted Sierra Finch - The Ash-breasted Sierra-finch is a species of bird in the Thraupidae family. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland, and subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.
Ash-breasted Tit-Tyrant - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Ash-browed Spinetail - The Ash-browed Spinetail is a species of bird in the Furnariidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Ash-coloured Tapaculo - It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Ash-throated Antwren - The first specimens were collected in northern Peru in 1983.
Ash-throated Casiornis - Its natural habitat is in subtropical or tropical dry forests.
Ash-throated Crake - Small secretive crake with a short bill. With black and olive brown streaks on the back. Tail is black, underparts slate, except throat is pale grey. Lower flanks and under tail coverts barred black and white. Sexes are alike. The nest is a large open bowl made out of dry grass, on the ground or just above. Well hidden between tree roots or grass. Clutch size is 2-5 eggs. No further data available. Diet consists of insects and insect larvae and grass seeds. Only appears in the open to feed.
Ash-throated Flycatcher - The nest is built in a tree cavity or similar natural or man-made hole, and the normal clutch is three or four eggs.
Ash-winged Antwren - The Ash-winged Antwren is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It is found in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Ashy Antwren - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Ashy Bulbul - It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Burma, Nepal, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Ashy Cisticola - The Ashy Cisticola is a species of bird in the Cisticolidae family. It is found in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, and Tanzania. Its natural habitats are dry savanna, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, and subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland.
Ashy Cuckooshrike - It is found in Comoros, Madagascar, and Mayotte. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Ashy Drongo - The adult Ashy Drongo is mainly dark grey, and the tail is long and deeply forked, There are a number of subspecies varying in the shade of the grey plumage. Some subspecies have white markings on the head. Young birds are dull brownish grey.
Ashy Minivet - It is 18.5–20 cm long. The male is grey above and whitish below. It has a black cap with a white forehead and there is a white band across the flight-feathers. The outer tail feathers are white. The bill and feet are black. The female's cap is grey apart from a black band between the bill and eye and a narrow white band above it. The call is a high-pitched, metallic trill.
Ashy Prinia - The Ashy Prinia or Ashy Wren-Warbler , is a small warbler. This prinia is a resident breeder in the Indian subcontinent, western Myanmar and Sri Lanka. It is a familiar bird of urban gardens and farmland in many parts of India and its small size, distinctive colours and upright tail make it easy to identify.
Ashy Storm Petrel - This is a small, uniformly sooty-brown storm petrel with a forked tail, closely resembling the Black Storm-petrel, however it is smaller and has a more fluttering style of flight, with the upstroke only becoming horizontal to the body before beginning the downstroke .
Ashy Tailor Bird - The Olive-Backed Tailorbird is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Singapore.
Ashy Tailorbird - The Ashy Tailorbird is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found in Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.
Ashy Thrush - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Ashy titmouse - The Oak Titmouse is a small, brown-tinged gray bird with small tuft or crest. The face is plain, and the undersides are a lighter gray. Sexes are similar, as there is very little to no sexual dimorphism.
Ashy Wood Pigeon - Its natural habitat is temperate forests.
Ashy Woodpecker - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Ashy Woodswallow - The plumage of this species is pale grey.
Ashy-fronted Flowerpecker - The Ashy Flowerpecker is a species of bird in the Dicaeidae family. It is endemic to Indonesia where it occurs on Seram, Ambon and nearby islands. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Ashy-headed Goose - The lined nest is built in tall grass, and 4–6 eggs are laid. This terrestrial species favours damp upland forest clearings and feeds by grazing; it rarely swims.
Ashy-headed Laughing Thrush - The Ashy-headed Laughingthrush is a rangy bird, 23 centimetre in length with a long floppy tail. It is rufous brown above and deep buff below, with a grey head and white throat. Like other babblers, these are noisy birds, and the characteristic laughing calls are often the best indication that they are present, since they are often difficult to see in their preferred habitat.
Ashy-headed Tyrannulet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Ashy-throated Parrotbill - The Ashy-throated Parrotbill, Paradoxornis alphonsianus, is a songbird. In old sources, it may be called Alphonse's Crow-tit; though superficially resembling a tit it is not a member of the Paridae. The native range of this species extends from south-west China to northern Vietnam, and it might have become naturalised in one area in Italy.
Ashy-throated Warbler - It is found in Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitats are temperate forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Asian Barred Owlet - at Jayanti in Buxa Tiger Reserve in Jalpaiguri district of West Bengal, India.
Asian Emerald Cuckoo - It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Republic of India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Asian Fairy-bluebird - This fairy-bluebird breeds across tropical southern Asia from the Himalayan foothills, India and Sri Lanka east to Indonesia. This species is found in moist hill-forest. Two or three eggs are laid in a small cup nest in a tree. It was described by British ornithologist John Latham in 1790. The only other member of the genus is the Philippine Fairy-bluebird I. cyanogastra.
Asian Glossy Starling - Asian Glossy Starling
Asian House Martin - This martin breeds in colonies, building mud nests under an overhang on a vertical cliff or the wall of a building. Both sexes build the nest, incubate the three or four white eggs and feed the chicks. The Asian House Martin feeds on small insects taken in flight, usually caught high in the air. The presence of terrestrial springtails and Lepidoptera larvae in its diet indicates that food is sometime picked from the ground.
Asian Koel - The Asian Koel is a member of the cuckoo order of birds, the Cuculiformes. It is found in South Asia, China, and Southeast Asia. It forms a superspecies with the closely related Black-billed and Pacific Koels which are sometimes treated as subspecies. The Asian Koel is a brood parasite that lays its eggs in the nests of crows and other hosts, where the young are raised by the foster parents. They are unusual among the cuckoos in being largely frugivorous as adults.
Asian Openbill - Asian Openbill Stork is a broad-winged soaring bird, which relies on moving between thermals of hot air for sustained flight. Like all storks, it flies with its neck outstretched. It is relatively small for a stork at 68 cm length. They breed near inland wetlands and build stick nest in trees, typically laying 2-6 eggs.
Asian Palm Swift - It is a common resident breeder in tropical Asia from India to the Philippines. The down and feather nest is glued to the underside of a palm leaf with saliva, which is also used to secure the usually two or three eggs. This is a bird of open country and cultivation, which is strongly associated with Oil Palms.
Asian Paradise-Flycatcher - The Asian Paradise-flycatcher , also known as the Common Paradise-flycatcher, is a medium-sized passerine bird. It was previously classified with the Old World flycatcher family Muscicapidae, but the paradise-flycatchers and monarch flycatchers are now placed in the family Monarchidae, and most members of this family are found in Australasia and tropical southern Asia.
Asian Pied Starling - The Asian Pied Starling , also known as Pied Myna, is a species of starling found in South and Southeast Asia. The taxonomic position has changed with it being placed with the Sturnus in the past.
Asian Short-toed Lark - The Asian Short-toed Lark is a species of lark in the Alaudidae family. It is found in China, India, Iran, Iraq, Japan, Kazakhstan, North Korea, South Korea, Mongolia, Myanmar, Pakistan, Russia, Turkey, and Turkmenistan.
Asian Stubtail - The Asian Stubtail is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found in China, Japan, North Korea, South Korea, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, the Philippines, Russia, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitat is temperate forests.
Asiatic Dowitcher - Adults have dark legs and a long straight dark bill, somewhat shorter than that of the Long-billed Dowitcher. The body is brown on top and reddish underneath in breeding plumage. The tail has a black and white barred pattern. The winter plumage is largely grey.
Assam Hornbill - The Austen's Brown Hornbill is a species of hornbill found in forests from north-eastern India and southern China and south to Vietnam and northern Thailand. It is often included as a subspecies of Tickell's Brown Hornbill.
Atherton Sericornis - It is endemic to Australia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Atlantisia podarces - When American ornithologist Alexander Wetmore described this species from subfossil remains which were found at Prosperous Bay, Saint Helena, he classified it into the new genus Aphanocrex. However, in 1973 American paleontologist Storrs Olson synonymised this genus with the genus Atlantisia which other representative is the Inaccessible Island Rail . While Olson had considered it as congenor of the Inaccessible Island Rail, other scientists regarded it not even as close relative and so it was renamed into Aphanocrex. The Saint Helena Swamphen was relatively large and reached almost the size of the New Zealand Weka . In contrast to the Weka it was more slender. Since Saint Helena was predator free until the sixteenth century, the swamphen had lost its ability to fly but it wings were better developed like the wings of the rails from Inaccessible Island and Ascension Island. Furthermore it had strong toes with long claws which give that species a good ability to climb and flutter up the steep valley walls. It
Atlapetes blancae - The Antioquia Brush-finch is a poorly known species from the Emberizidae family. It was scientifically described in 2007 on basis of three museum specimens from Antioquia, Colombia, which were previously labelled as Slaty Brush-finch . The specific epithet blancae refers to the whitish underparts of the new species, while also commemorating the Colombian lepidopterologist Blanca Huertas, the wife of ornithologist Thomas Donegan . All three museum skins were collected in the 20th century, but only one label has a date, which is given with 1971. Subsequent fieldwork in Antioquia has failed to find this species again. The species description has been approved by the South American Classification Committee. It has been recommended for a critically endangered status.
Auckland Islands Merganser - This duck was similar in size to the Red-breasted Merganser. The adult male had a dark reddish-brown head, crest and neck, with bluish black mantle and tail and slate grey wings. The female was slightly smaller with a shorter crest.
Auckland Islands Rail - The Auckland Rail is a small rail with chestnut back plumage and a grey breast. The flanks are barred black and white and the head is red-brown, with a red bill. It is smaller than the Australian Lewins' Rail. There are conflicting reports about its ability to fly, early accounts suggested it could, but recent researchers have found little evidence for this. If the species is able to fly it does so very infrequently. Auckland Rails have a variety of calls, the most common being a crex call made at one second intervals 10 or more times in a row. The function of the calls is unknown.
Auckland Islands Shag - The Auckland Shag is considered vulnerable by the IUCN due to its small population size and restricted global range. Only around 2000 Auckland Shags exist in their remote habitat.
Audouin's Gull - The Audouin's Gull is a large gull restricted to the Mediterranean and the western coast of Saharan Africa. It breeds on small islands colonially or alone, laying 2-3 eggs on a ground nest. As is the case with many gulls, it has traditionally been placed in the genus Larus.
Augur Buzzard - The Jackal Buzzard is a 55–60 cm long African bird of prey with three main subspecies.
Austen's Barwing - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Austen's Laughing Thrush - The Yellow-throated Laughingthrush is a species of bird in the Timaliidae family. It is found in grassy areas with bushes and trees, scrub and forest in north-eastern India, south-eastern Bangladesh and western Myanmar. Until recently, it included the Blue-crowned Laughingthrush as a subspecies, but unlike that species the crown of the Yellow-throated Laughingthrush is pale grey .
Austral Canastero - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry shrubland and temperate grassland.
Austral Parakeet - It occurs mostly in wooded country, but also shrubland and farmland. It stays near sea level in the extreme south, but ranges up to 2000m at the northern end of its range. Flock size is usually only 10-15 individuals, though flocks over 100 are known. It eats grass and bamboo seeds, nuts and small fruit, and nests in tree cavities.
Austral Pygmy Owl - Its natural habitat is temperate forests.
Austral Thrush - The Austral Thrush is similar to the European Blackbird also of the genus Turdus, with a yellow bill and feet, a dark brown head, back and wings and a lighter underside. In T. f. falcklandii the underside tends towards ochre, but the smaller T. f. magellanicus is more olive below. The throat of both subspecies is streaked.
Australasian Bittern - It is a large bittern, patterned and streaked brown, buff and black, with a pale throat. It is a cryptic and partly nocturnal species that inhabits densely vegetated wetlands. It feeds on aquatic animals such as frogs, eels and freshwater crustaceans. It is a solitary nester on the ground in dense wetland vegetation on trampled reeds and other plants. It has a distinctive booming voice and may be heard more often than seen.
Australasian Gannet - Young birds are black in their first year, and gradually acquire more white in subsequent seasons until they reach maturity after five years.
Australasian Grass-Owl - Though some authorities consider this owl to be conspecific with the African Grass-owl, T. capensis, other consider it to be a valid species.
Australasian Grebe - It is an excellent swimmer and diver, and usually dives immediately when alarmed and swims away under water.
Australasian Pipit - It was formerly lumped together with the Richard's, African, Mountain and Paddyfield Pipits in a single species: Richard's Pipit, Anthus novaeseelandiae. Some authors split the Australasian Pipit further into two species: Australian Pipit in Australia and New Guinea and New Zealand Pipit in New Zealand.
Australasian Shoveler - The male has a blue-grey head with a vertical white crescent in front of the eyes.
Australian Bee Eater - Rainbow bee-eaters are brilliantly colored birds that grow to be 7 to 8 inches in length, including the elongated tail feathers. The upper back and wings are green in color, and the lower back and under-tail coverts are bright blue. The undersides of the wings and primary flight feathers are red and tipped with black, and the tail is black to deep violet. The rainbow bee-eater's two central tail feathers are longer than the other tail feathers, and are longer in the female rainbow bee-eaters than in the males. The crown of the head, the stomach and breast, and the throat are pale yellowish in color, and the rainbow bee-eater has a black bib and a black stripe through its red eye.
Australian Blue-billed Duck - The Blue-billed Duck was described in 1836 by ornithologist John Gould. The specific name australis is derived from the latin for "southern" and hence Australian, while the generic name is derived from the latin oxy- "sharp" and ura "tail".
Australian Brush-turkey - It is a spectacular large bird with a total length of 60–75 cm and a wingspan of about 85 cm. The subspecies A. l. purpureicollis from the northern Cape York Peninsula is smaller than the more widespread nominate subspecies. It has a prominent, fan-like tail flattened sideways, and its plumage is mainly blackish, but with a bare red head, and a yellow or purple wattle . The male's wattle becomes much larger during breeding season, often swinging from side to side as they run. The males' heads and wattles also become much brighter during the breeding and nesting season. The underside of the body is sprinkled with white feathers, more pronounced in older birds. The Brush-turkey flies very clumsily with heavy flapping when it is frightened and roosts in trees at night and during the heat of the day.
Australian Bustard - The male is up to 1.2 m tall with a 2.3 m wingspan. The average weight for males is 7.5 kg . The female is quite a bit smaller at 80 cm tall and 3 kg in weight but is similarly coloured. The back, wings and tail are dull brown, with mottled black and white markings on the wing coverts. The neck and head appear dull white and the crown black. Legs are yellow to cream coloured.
Australian Crow - The Torresian Crow was described by ornithologist Charles Lucien Bonaparte in 1850,
Australian Darter - The Australasian Darter or Australian Darter is a species of bird in the darter family, Anhingidae . It is found in Australia, Indonesia, New Zealand, and Papua New Guinea.
Australian Hobby - It strongly resembles the Peregrine Falcon, however it is much smaller and has darker plumage.
Australian King Parrot - The Australian King Parrot was first described by the German naturalist Martin Lichtenstein in 1818. The species belongs to the genus Alisterus, whose three members are known as king parrots. The genus is sometimes sunk into the genus Aprosmictus.
Australian Magpie - Gymnorhina tibicen
Australian Masked-Owl - Described subspecies of Tyto novaehollandiae include:
Australian Owlet-Nightjar - The Australian Owlet-nightjar is a small to medium sized owlet-nightjar with grey upperparts and a white, barred front and a distinct dark and pale patterning on the head. In the north of Australia females can also have a rufous morph. The plumage is overall paler in desert populations. It is adapted to live in open woodland, with more pointed wings and larger feet, unlike most of the rest of the family that live in dense forest . It lives in a variety of habitats as well as open woodland, including mangrove swamps, grasslands, mallee scrub as well as dense forest.
Australian parrot - The Night Parrot is a small broad-tailed parrot endemic to the continent of Australia. The species was originally placed within its own genus , The well-known budgerigar is a not-too-distant relative of these birds.
Australian pelican - The Australian Pelican was first described by Dutch naturalist Coenraad Jacob Temminck in 1824. Its specific epithet is derived from the Latin verb conspicere 'to perceive', hence 'conspicuous'.
Australian Pied Imperial Pigeon - The Torresian Imperial-pigeon is a large plump pigeon, 38-44 centimetres in length, The head can be brown, soiled by eating fruit.
Australian Raven - It is omnivorous and has adapted well to urban environments and is a common city bird in Sydney and Canberra.
Australian Reed-Warbler - The Australian Reed-Warbler Acrocephalus australis is an Old World warbler in the genus Acrocephalus. It lives in reedbeds across Australia. It is about 16 centimetres long, and brown and buff in colour.
Australian ringneck - Barnardius barnardi
Australian Shelduck - This is a bird which breeds in southern Australia and Tasmania. In the southern winter, many birds move further north than the breeding range. As with other shelducks, this species has favoured moulting grounds, such as Lake George, NSW, where sizeable concentrations occur.
Australian Stilt - The White-headed Stilt or Pied Stilt is a bird in the Recurvirostridae family. It is sometimes treated as a distinct species Himantopus leucocephalus, sometimes included in the Common or Black-winged Stilt as Himantopus himantopus leucocephalus.
Australian White Ibis - Historically rare in urban areas, the Australian White Ibis has immigrated to urban areas of the east coast in increasing numbers since the late 1970s; it is now commonly seen in Wollongong, Sydney, the Gold Coast, Brisbane and Townsville. Debate continues on whether to consider it a pest or vulnerable species. Populations have disappeared from natural breeding areas such as the Macquarie Marshes in northwestern New South Wales. Despite this, the species has been culled in parts of Sydney due to their smell and at times obtrusive nature. Its sister species is the Sacred Ibis.
Avocet - This species gets its English and scientific names from its black cap, as once worn by European advocates or lawyers.
Ayres's Hawk-Eagle - Ayres's Hawk-eagle is a species of bird of prey in the Accipitridae family. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Azara's Spinetail - It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and heavily degraded former forest.
Azores' Bullfinch - The Azores Bullfinch , also known as the São Miguel Bullfinch , or locally in Portuguese as the Priolo, is a critically endangered passerine bird in the true finch family. It is endemic to São Miguel Island, in the Azores archipelago of Macaronesia in the North Atlantic Ocean.
Azuero Dove - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical swamps. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Azure Gallinule - The bill and frontal shield is a pale greenish-yellow.The wing coverts are greenish-blue while the back and tail are browner. The throat and underparts are white while the legs are yellow.
Azure Jay - It has a total length of approximately 40 cm, and its plumage is intensely blue with a contrasting black head and upper chest. Males and females are similar, although the females typically are smaller.
Azure Kingfisher - It is a very colourful bird, with deep blue to azure back, a large white to buff spot on side of neck and throat, rufous-buff with some blue-violet streaks on breast and flanks. The feet are red with only two forward toes. The lores are white and inconspicuous except in front view, where they stand out as two large white eye-like spots.
Azure Nuthatch - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Azure-breasted Pitta - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Azure-hooded Jay - The jays travel in groups of two to ten individuals and may join mixed-species flocks. It is a secretive species and therefore difficult to observe in the wild. As an omnivore, this jay eats berries, seeds, and small, dead animals. Females lay three to four eggs, and the young fledge after twenty days. This species is listed as Least Concern, meaning it is not threatened with extinction.
Azure-naped Jay - The Azure-naped Jay is a species of bird in the Corvidae family. It is found in Brazil, Colombia, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Azure-rumped Tanager - Its plumage is mostly very pale blue, though it has a periwinkle crown. It also has a black mask around its lores. The bill is gray with a dark tip. The mantle is mottled green and black. The wings and tail are black with blue edgings. This bird makes a wi sseeu song and a sii call.
Azure-shouldered Tanager - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and heavily degraded former forest. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.

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