Birds beginning with O

Oahu Amakihi - This species was first named by Andrew Bloxam . He saw it and collected specimens from Oʻahu while in the Hawaiian Islands in 1825 as the naturalist on board HMS Blonde.
Oahu Oo - The males reached a length of 30.5 centimetres. The wing length was 10.5 to 11.4 centimetres, the culmen was between 3.5 and 3.8 centimetres and the tarsus was between 3.4 and 3.8 centimetres. The females were smaller. The plumage was predominantly sooty black. The tail feathers were brown and had, with the exception of the two central tail feathers, white tips. Further characteristics were the white feather tufts under the axillaries and the two narrow central tail feathers which changed into fine hair-like or fibrous tips. The flanks and the undertail coverts were coloured deeply yellow. The bill and the tarsus were black. Its biology is not well-studied.
Oasis Hummingbird - The Oasis Hummingbird's natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.
Oaxaca Hummingbird - Like White-tailed Hummingbird, it is sometimes considered a subspecies of the more widespread Stripe-tailed Hummingbird.
Oberlaender's Ground-Thrush - The Forest Ground-thrush or Oberlaender's Ground-thrush is a species of bird in the Turdidae family. It is found in Democratic Republic of the Congo and Uganda. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Obi Woodcock - An Indonesian endemic, the Moluccan Woodcock is restricted to two small islands in North Maluku. It is known from eight specimens, with the most recent collected in 1980. Nothing is known of its habits.
Obscure Berrypecker - The Obscure Berrypecker is a drab olive coloured bird with a greyish wash on its upperparts. It resembles the female Black Berrypecker except that its wing linings and pectoral tufts are yellowish and the bill is pale coloured. The species is arboreal and probably is a solitary forager of fruit and small invertebrates obtained by hover-gleaning .
Obscure Honeyeater - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Ocellated Antbird - The species is 19cm long and weighs around 50 g. The eye is surrounded by a large area of bare blue coloured skin. The plumage varies slightly amongst the three subspecies, but overall it has a grey crown, black throat with a buff breast changing into a spotted belly and back.
Ocellated Crake - The Ocellated Crake is a species of bird in the Rallidae family. It belongs to the monotypic genus Micropygia. It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, French Guiana, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are dry savanna and subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland.
Ocellated Poorwill - The Ocellated Poorwill is a species of nightjar in the Caprimulgidae family. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay, and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Ocellated Quail - The Ocellated Quail is a species of bird in the Odontophoridae family. It is found in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and Nicaragua. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Ocellated Tapaculo - This passerine averages 8.3-8.7 in in length and between 2.8-3.5 oz . The bird is mostly black with large white spots, a brown flank, and a reddish head and throat. A call, apparently given by birds to announce their presence to conspecifics, is described as "loud, emphatic WHEEUW! whistle" which as it seems can be heard from a long distance .
Ocellated Thrasher - It is about 30 cm long. Its upperparts are brown while the underparts are white with round black spots. The outer tail-feathers have narrow white tips. It has a long musical song with phrases of two or three notes.
Ocellated Turkey - The Ocellated Turkey lives only in a 130,000 km² range of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico which includes the states of Quintana Roo, Campeche and Yucatán, as well as parts of southern Tabasco and northeastern Chiapas. They also can be found in the northern parts of Belize and Guatemala.
Ocellated Woodcreeper - It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Ochetorhynchus ruficaudus - The Straight-billed Earthcreeper is a species of bird in the Furnariidae family. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.
Ochraceous Attila - The Ochraceous Attila is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and plantations . It is threatened by habitat loss.
Ochraceous Bulbul - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Ochraceous Pewee - The Ochraceous Pewee is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Costa Rica, Mexico, and Panama. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Ochraceous Piculet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Ochraceous Wren - It breeds in mountains at 900 m to 2500 m altitude (sometimes up to 3000 m in wet epiphyte-laden forests, and semi-open areas such as woodland edges, tall second growth and pasture with trees. Its cup nest is constructed in a swinging mass of epiphytes hanging from a branch 5–15 m high in a tree. The eggs are incubated by the female alone for about two weeks to hatching, and the young fledge in about the same length of time again.
Ochraceous-breasted Flycatcher - The Ochraceous-breasted Flycatcher is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Bolivia and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Ochre-bellied Flycatcher - The Ochre-bellied Flycatcher, Mionectes oleagineus, is a small bird of the tyrant flycatcher family. It breeds from southern Mexico through Central America, and South America east of the Andes as far as southern Brazil, and on Trinidad and Tobago.
Ochre-bellied Hawk-Owl - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Ochre-breasted Antpitta - It is found in Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Panama, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Ochre-breasted Pipit - It is found in Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay.
Ochre-breasted Tanager - The Ochre-breasted Tanager is a species of bird in the Cardinalidae family. It is found in Colombia and Ecuador. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Ochre-browed Thistletail - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.
Ochre-cheeked Spinetail - The Ochre-cheeked Spinetail is a species of bird in the Furnariidae family. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, and Brazil. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Ochre-collared Piculet - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, and heavily degraded former forest.
Ochre-faced Tody-Flycatcher - The Ochre-faced Tody-flycatcher is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family.
Ochre-fronted Antpitta - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Ochre-marked parakeet - One of the largest among Pyrrhura parakeets, the Ochre-marked Parakeet is endemic to lowland humid forests of coastal areas of southeastern Brazil. The diet consists mainly of tree-fruits, seeds, flowers and berries. It nests in a tree cavity. The female usually lays between two to four eggs.
Ochre-naped Ground Tyrant - It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, and Peru. Its natural habitats are temperate grassland and subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.
Ochre-rumped Antbird - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Ochre-striped Antpitta - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Oenanthe albonigra - The Hume's Wheatear is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Afghanistan, Bahrain, India, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, and United Arab Emirates.
Oenanthe bifasciata - The Buff-streaked Chat is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Lesotho, South Africa, and Swaziland. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland.
Oenanthe chrysopygia - The Red-tailed Wheatear , also known as the Rusty-tailed Wheatear, Persian Wheatear or Afghan Wheatear, is a small passerine bird breeding in mountainous areas of south-west and central Asia. It belongs to the wheatear genus Oenanthe which was formerly placed in the thrush family Turdidae but is now in the Old World flycatcher family Muscicapidae. The Red-tailed Wheatear used to be considered a subspecies of the Kurdistan Wheatear but is now often regarded as a separate species.
Ogea Flycatcher - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. The species is little known, it feeds on insects and is thought to breed around July. The species is not thought to be threatened by habitat loss, instead it is considered vulnerable due to its tiny range and the prospect of introduced predators hunting it. It has been proposed that extra populations be established on other islands to act as a safeguard. It does not have a local name.
Oilbird - Oilbirds are related to the nightjars and usually placed with these in the order Caprimulgiformes. It is sufficiently distinctive to be placed in a family and suborder of its own; more recent research indicates that it should even be considered a distinct order .
Okinawa Rail - The Okinawa Rail is a species of bird in the rail family, Rallidae. It is endemic to Okinawa Island in Japan where it is known as the Yanbaru Kuina . Its existence was only confirmed in 1978 and it was formally described in 1981 although unidentified rails had been recorded on the island since at least 1973 and local stories of a bird known as the agachi kumira may refer to this species.
Olivaceous Alseonax - The Olivaceous Flycatcher or Olivaceous Alseonax is a species of bird in the family Muscicapidae. It is found in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical swamps.
Olivaceous Elaenia - It is found in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay.
Olivaceous Flatbill - It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical swamps.
Olivaceous Greenlet - The Olivaceous Greenlet is a species of bird in the Vireonidae family. It is found in on the eastern slope of the Andes in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Olivaceous Piculet - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and heavily degraded former forest.
Olivaceous Piha - The Olivaceous Piha is a species of bird in the Cotingidae family. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru.
Olivaceous Thornbill - The Olivaceous Thornbill is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found in Bolivia and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.
Olivaceous Thrush - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Olivaceous Warbler - Olivaceous Warbler can refer to one of two bird species, formerly regarded as conspecific:
Olivaceous Woodcreeper - It is presently the only member of the genus Sittasomus, but includes several vocally and morphologically distinct forms. Thus, the species might be split into several in the future.
Olive Bulbul - Found only on the Nicobar Islands of India, the Nicobar Bulbul is a songbird species in the bulbul family . Its scientific name is Hypsipetes virescens as long as Ixos is recognized as a distinct genus.
Olive Flycatcher - The Olive Tufted Flycatcher is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Bolivia and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Olive Flyrobin - The Olive Flyrobin is a species of bird in the Petroicidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Olive Honeyeater - The Olive Honeyeater is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is endemic to Indonesia.
Olive Long-tailed Cuckoo - The Olive Long-tailed Cuckoo is a species of cuckoo in the Cuculidae family. It is found in Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Uganda, and Zambia.
Olive Manakin - The Olive Manakin is a species of bird in the Pipridae family.
Olive Sparrow - It is 14–15.5 centimetres long, and is the only sparrow with an olive back. It has a prominent brown eye streak and a brown-striped crown, with a buffy breast, some white belly feathers, and a conical beak. The sexes are similar, while the juvenile is buffier with some streaking on the belly. The Olive Sparrow looks similar to the Green-tailed Towhee but is smaller and lacks a rusty cap.
Olive Straightbill - The Olive Straightbill is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Olive Sunbird - The western subspecies are sometimes split as the Western Olive Sunbird, Nectarinia obscura, in which case Nectarinia olivacea becomes the Eastern Olive Sunbird
Olive Thrush - It can reach a length of 24 cm and a mass of at least 101 grams. The tail and the upperparts are coloured dull olive brown. The belly is white and the rest of the underparts have an orange hue. The throat is speckled with white spots. It can be found in evergreen forests, parks, and gardens. Its diet consists of earthworms, insects, snails, fruits, and spiders.
Olive warbler - This species breeds from southern Arizona and New Mexico, USA, south through Mexico to Nicaragua. It is the only bird family endemic to North America . It was in the past classed with the Parulidae , but DNA studies suggest that it split early from the other related passerines, prior to the differentiation of the entire New World warbler/American sparrow/Icterid group. It is therefore now given a family of its own.
Olive Whistler - Federally they are considered of Least Concern , but in New South Wales they are considered Vulnerable. Department of Environment and Conservation, NSW
Olive-backed Euphonia - The Olive-backed Euphonia is found in wet forests, tall second growth and adjacent bushy clearings, typically from sea level to 750 m altitude, sometimes up to 1000 m. The spherical cup nest, with a side entrance, is hidden amongst epiphytes or mosses 2–11 m high in a tree. The normal clutch is three brown-marked white eggs.
Olive-backed Flowerpecker - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Olive-backed Foliage-gleaner - The Olive-backed Foliage-gleaner is a species of bird in the Furnariidae family. It is found in humid forests of most of the Amazon Basin, except in the south-eastern part, where the Para Foliage-gleaner is found. The two are closely related and were considered conspecific until recently.
Olive-backed Oriole - Where the Yellow Oriole specialises in damp, thickly vegetated habitats in the tropical far north, the Olive-backed Oriole is more versatile, preferring more open woodland environments, and tolerating drier climates . Common to very common in the north, Olive-backed Orioles are less frequently seen in the south, but nevertheless reach as far as south-eastern South Australia. Their range is from the very north of Western Australia across the east and south coasts to Victoria and the corner of South Australia. Most birds breed during the tropical wet season, but some migrate south to breed in the southern summer.
Olive-backed Quail Dove - It is found in Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Nicaragua, and Panama. Its natural habitat is lowland tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests.
Olive-backed Sunbird - The Olive-backed Sunbird, Cinnyris jugularis, also known as the Yellow-bellied Sunbird, is a species of sunbird found from Southern Asian to Australia.
Olive-backed Tanager - The Olive-backed Tanager is a species of bird in the Thraupidae family. It is found in Brazil, Guyana, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Olive-backed Woodcreeper - The Olive-backed Woodcreeper is a species of bird in the Dendrocolaptinae subfamily. It is found in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Olive-backed Woodpecker - The Olive-backed Woodpecker is a species of bird in the Picidae family. It is found in Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, and Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Olive-brown Oriole - The Timor subspecies is sometimes split as the Timor Oriole, Oriolus viridifuscus
Olive-capped Flowerpecker - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Olive-chested Flycatcher - The Olive-chested Flycatcher is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Olive-crowned Crescentchest - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.
Olive-crowned Flowerpecker - The Olive-crowned Flowerpecker is a small passerine bird in the flowerpecker family, Dicaeidae. It is found in far western New Guinea and on adjacent islands. There are two subspecies: D. p. ignotum on Gebe Island and D. p. pectorale elsewhere.
Olive-crowned Yellowthroat - The Olive-crowned Yellowthroat is a species of bird in the Parulidae family. It is found in Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Panama. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist shrubland and heavily degraded former forest.
Olive-flanked Robin-Chat - The Olive-flanked Robin-chat is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, and Zambia. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Olive-flanked Whistler - The Yellow-flanked Whistler , also known as the Olive-flanked Whistler, is a species of bird that is endemic to montane forests on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi.
Olive-green Camaroptera - It is found in Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, and Uganda. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and subtropical or tropical moist shrubland.
Olive-green Tanager - It is endemic to Brazil. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes and heavily degraded former forest.
Olive-green Tyrannulet - The Olive-green Tyrannulet is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family, the tyrant flycatchers. It is found in the Guianas of Suriname, French Guiana, and eastern Guyana, with the Essequibo River; also northeast Brazil, in the northeast Amazon Basin of Pará state, and Amapá. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Olive-headed Brush Finch - This species has a yellow to dark olive head. The throat, chin, malar streak, lores, eye-ring, and ear patch are bright yellow in any case. The rest of the plumage is yellow with dark olive upperparts, wing and tail. The variation in the head color is not well explained, but it is likely that the olive-headed individuals are females and/or immature birds.
Olive-headed Lorikeet - The Olive-headed Lorikeet is a mainly green parrot about 24 cm long. It has an olive coloured head which is demarcated by a green collar. Its beak is orange-red, its irises are red, and its legs are grey. The male and female have an identical external appearance. Juveniles have a slightly greener head, a brown beak, and brown irises.
Olive-rumped Serin - The Olive-Rumped Serin is a species of finch in the Fringillidae family. It is found in Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Olive-sided flycatcher - Adults are dark olive on the face, upperparts and flanks. They have light underparts, a large dark bill and a short tail.
Olive-spotted Hummingbird - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist shrubland.
Olive-streaked Honeyeater - The Olive-streaked Honeyeater is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Olive-striped Flycatcher - It is found in Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela.
Olive-tree Warbler - This small passerine bird is a species found in open-canopy oakwoods, olive groves, orchards and almond plantations. 3-4 eggs are laid in a nest in a low tree or a bush.
Olive-yellow Myzomela - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Olrog's Cinclodes - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.
Olrog's Gull - It is threatened by habitat loss.
Omao - Adult thrushes are mostly nondescriptive, with a grayish-brown head transitioning to a pale gray below. The back and primaries are a dull olive brown. They also have whitish vents and undertail coverts. The juveniles are also similarly dull in coloration, but have pale whitish-buff spotting on the wing coverts.
One-coloured Becard - The One-colored Becard is a species of bird in the Tityridae family. It has traditionally been placed in Cotingidae or Tyrannidae, but evidence strongly suggest it is better placed in Tityridae, where now placed by SACC. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and heavily degraded former forest.
Onychorhynchus mexicanus - The Northern Royal Flycatcher is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is, together with O. occidentalis and O. swainsoni, often considered a subspecies of O. coronatus.
Onychorhynchus swainsoni - The Atlantic Royal Flycatcher is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is often considered a subspecies of Onychorhynchus coronatus.
Opal-crowned Manakin - The Opal-crowned Manakin is a species of bird in the Pipridae family. It is endemic to Brazil.
Opal-crowned Tanager - It is found in the eastern Andes drainages to the western Amazon Basin in southern Colombia, eastern Ecuador and Peru and a region of northwestern Bolivia; for Brazil in southwestern-western Amazonas state and Acre.
Orange Bishop - The Northern Red Bishop or Orange Bishop is a resident breeding bird species in Africa south of the Sahara Desert and north of the Equator. It has been introduced to Puerto Rico, Martinique and Guadeloupe in the West Indies. It was formerly regarded as a subspecies of the Southern Red Bishop of the southern half of Africa. The two are now usually classified as separate species.
Orange Bullfinch - The Orange Bullfinch is a species of finch in the Fringillidae family. It is found in India and Pakistan. Its natural habitat is temperate forests.
Orange Chat - The Orange Chat is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is endemic to Australia.
Orange Dove - The Orange Dove is distributed and endemic to forests of Vanua Levu, Taveuni, Rabi, Kioa, Qamea and Laucala islands of Fiji. The diet consists mainly of various small fruits, berries, caterpillars and insects. The female usually lays one white egg.
Orange Ground Thrush - The Orange Ground-thrush is a species of bird in the Turdidae family. It is found in Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Orange Oriole - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Orange Weaver - These birds exhibit sexual dimorphism, and plumage also varies seasonally. During breeding or "nuptial" season, the male has a black beak, black plumage around the eyes, and brown wings, The rest of the plumage is a brilliant red to orange in color. Outside of breeding season, the males sport plumage that is considerably more drab, brown overall with some dark streaks and a cream-colored belly. The females have the same plumage year-round, which resembles that of the off-season males. The males of this species are often confused males of the species E. o. orix, more commonly known as the grenadier weaver, or red bishop.
Orange-backed Woodpecker - The Orange-backed Woodpecker, Reinwardtipicus validus, is a woodpecker found in Indonesia. It is the only member of the genus Reinwardtipicus.
Orange-banded Flycatcher - The Orange-banded Flycatcher is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Orange-barred Willow Warbler - It is found in Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitats are boreal forests and temperate forests.
Orange-bellied Antwren - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Orange-bellied Flowerpecker - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and subtropical or tropical moist montane forets.
Orange-bellied Fruit Dove - The dove is found in New Guinea, the Aru Islands and western Papuan islands where it inhabits lowland rainforest, secondary forest and mangroves. It has been recorded from Boigu Island, Queensland, Australian territory in northern Torres Strait.
Orange-bellied Leafbird - The scientific name commemorates the English naturalist Thomas Hardwicke.
Orange-bellied manakin - The Orange-bellied Manakin , also known as the Tepui Manakin, is a species of bird in the Pipridae family. It resembles and is closely related to the White-fronted Manakin , and the two were formerly considered conspecific.
Orange-bellied parakeet - The Orange-bellied Parrot breeds in Tasmania and winters in coastal grasslands on southern mainland Australia. With a population fewer than 75 wild birds, it is regarded as a critically endangered species.
Orange-billed Babbler - The Orange-billed Babbler is a resident breeding bird endemic to Sri Lanka. In the past, it was considered to be a race of Jungle Babbler, Turdoides striatus.
Orange-billed Nightingale-Thrush - The Orange-billed Nightingale-thrush is a species of bird in the Turdidae family. It is found in Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and heavily degraded former forest.
Orange-billed Sparrow - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Orange-breasted Bunting - The Orange-breasted Bunting is a species of bird in the Cardinalidae family. It is endemic to Mexico. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Orange-breasted Bushshrike - The Orange-breasted Bush-shrike or Braun's Bush-shrike is a species of bird in the Malaconotidae family. It is endemic to Angola.
Orange-breasted Falcon - It is found from southern Mexico to northern Argentina. It's a medium sized bird . It is a bird predator, with strong talons that enable it to catch prey in flight, and is considered by some - as the German-Brazilian ornithologist Helmut Sick - as filling the ecological niche of the Peregrine Falcon as a breeding species in Tropical America. The Orange-breasted Falcon, however, seems to favor more heavily wooded habitats than the Peregrine, therefore the species does not seem to be in ecological competition with Peregrine Falcons wintering in South America.
Orange-breasted Honeyeater - Its natural habitats are tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.
Orange-breasted Rockjumper - This is a ground-nesting species which forages on rocky slopes and scree. It frequently perches on rocks. The closely related Rufous Rock-jumper, Chaetops frenatus is sometimes considered to be conspecific. The latter species uses one or two additional individuals, usually offspring of the adult pair from the preceding breeding season, to assist the breeding pair. in territorial defence and alarm calling, and in the feeding of nestlings and fledglings. Given the great similarities between the species, it is likely that Orange-breasted Rock-jumper uses a similar strategy.
Orange-breasted Sunbird - As with other sunbirds the bill is long and decurved, that of the male being longer than that of the female. The bill, legs and feet are black. The eye is dark brown.
Orange-breasted Trogon - Orange-breasted trogons generally have an olive-yellow head with feathers that are bristled and upright, chestnut upperparts, orange breast that changes to bright yellow on upper and lower portions, white bars on wing sections, and a blue bill. Males have a dull olive-yellowish head with a blue ring; rufous upperparts and upper tail with paler rump ; broad white bars on wing sections; and yellow upper breast with some white along the mid-line. Females have additional gray-brown on head and upperparts; pale buffy-brown rump, gray breast; and yellow lower underparts. Juveniles are similar to females, with young males having warmer brown upperparts.
Orange-browed Hemispingus - The Orange-browed Hemispingus is a species of bird in the Thraupidae family. It is found in Bolivia and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Orange-cheeked Honeyeater - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Orange-cheeked Waxbill - Lives in small family parties or flocks of thirty of more individuals. Their high-pitched "peeps" are the best clue of their presence. Like most estridids, they are very acrobatic in their movements on twigs and grass stems, "climbing" up and down verticals and hanging upside down while feeding. Males usually have brighter orange patches on the abdomen.
Orange-chinned Parakeet - The Orange-chinned Parakeet is about 17.5 cm long. It is mainly green and some of the wing feathers are brown/bronze. It has a small clump of bright orange feathers under its beak, hence one of its common names; although, the orange feathers may not be visible depending of the parrots posture and the viewing angle. Its beak is horn coloured.
Orange-collared Manakin - It occurs in the lowlands and foothills of the Pacific slope up to 1100 m, being replaced on the Caribbean slopes of tropical Central America by the closely related White-collared Manakin, M. candei, and eastwards of its range to northwestern Colombia by the Golden-collared Manakin, Manacus vitellinus, of which was formerly considered a subspecies.
Orange-crested Flycatcher - The Orange-crested Flycatcher is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Orange-crested Manakin - The Orange-crested Manakin is a species of bird in the Pipridae family. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical swamps and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Orange-crowned Euphonia - The Orange-crowned Euphonia is a species of bird in the Thraupidae family. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and heavily degraded former forest.
Orange-crowned Oriole - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and heavily degraded former forest.
Orange-crowned Warbler - The Orange-crowned Warbler is a small songbird of the New World warbler family.
Orange-eyed flycatcher - The binomial commemorates the American ornithologist Melvin Alvah Traylor Jr..
Orange-flanked Bush-Robin - The Red-flanked Bluetail , also known as the Orange-flanked Bush-robin, is a small passerine bird that was formerly classed as a member of the thrush family Turdidae, but is now more generally considered to be an Old World flycatcher, Muscicapidae. It, and related species, are often called chats.
Orange-footed Scrub Fowl - This species comprises five subspecies found on many islands in Wallacea as well as southern New Guinea and northern Australia. It is a terrestrial bird the size of a domestic chicken and dark-coloured with strong orange legs and a pointed crest at the back of the head. It utilises a range of forest and scrub habitats and has colonised many small islands throughout its range. In general, populations seem to be stable and the conservation status of the species is considered to be of Least Concern.
Orange-fronted Barbet - The Orange-fronted Barbet is a species of bird in the Capitonidae family. It is found in Colombia and Ecuador. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Orange-fronted Fruit Dove - The Orange-fronted Fruit-dove is a species of bird in the Columbidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.
Orange-fronted Parakeet - There are three subspecies:
Orange-fronted Parakeet - For many years the Malherbe's Parakeet was considered a subspecies or as color variant They live in Nothofagus forest on the South Island of New Zealand, although they may have had a wider range of habitats prior to the arrival of humans. They have been threatened by the felling of old growth forest, which provided the older trees which they nested in, by overgrazing of the low bushes which they fed in, and by predation by introduced rats, stoats and cats.
Orange-fronted Plushcrown - It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Orange-fronted Yellow Finch - The Orange-fronted Yellow-finch is a species of bird in the Emberizidae family. It is found in Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist shrubland and heavily degraded former forest.
Orange-gorgetted Flycatcher - It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Hong Kong, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Orange-headed Tanager - The Orange-headed Tanager is a species of bird in the Thraupidae family. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, and heavily degraded former forest.
Orange-headed Thrush - It is common in well-wooded areas of India, China and southeast Asia. Most populations are resident. The species shows a preference for shady damp areas, and like many Zoothera thrushes, can be quite secretive.
Orange-spotted Bulbul - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Orange-tufted Sunbird - The Orange-tufted Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is found in Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Nigeria, Uganda, and Zambia.
Orange-winged Amazon - There are two subspecies:
Orange-winged Pytilia - It is commonly found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, the Republic of Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia & Zimbabwe. The status of the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
Orangeriver Francolin - The Orange River Francolin is a species of bird in the Phasianidae family. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Namibia, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, and Uganda.
Orchard Oriole - This species is 6.3 inches long and weighs 20 g. The bill is pointed and black with some blue-gray at the base of the lower mandible . The adult male of the nominate subspecies has chestnut on the underparts, shoulder, and rump, with the rest of the plumage black. In the subspecies I. s. fuertesi, the chestnut is replaced with ochre . The adult female and the juvenile of both subspecies have olive-green on the upper parts and yellowish on the breast and belly. All adults have pointed bills and white wing bars. One-year-old males are yellow-greenish with a black bib.
Oriental Bay-Owl - A population of this species has apparently become extinct on Samar Island in the Philippines during the 20th century. It was described as Phodilus badius riverae and was only ever known from a single specimen, which was lost in a bombing raid in 1945. The validity of this taxon is uncertain; it is usually synonymized with the nominate subspecies or the subspecies saturatus ; it might be a distinct species, however
Oriental Cuckoo - The Oriental Cuckoo or Horsfields Cuckoo is a bird belonging to the genus Cuculus in the cuckoo family Cuculidae. It was formerly classified as a subspecies of the Himalayan Cuckoo with the name Oriental Cuckoo used for the combined species. Differences in voice and size suggest that they should be treated as a separate species.
Oriental Dwarf Kingfisher - The Oriental Dwarf Kingfisher also known as the Black-backed Kingfisher is a species of bird in the Alcedinidae family. Small red and yellow kingfisher, yellow underparts with bluish-black upperparts. This is a widespread resident of lowland forest. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Republic of India, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Oriental goldfinch - It nests in trees or bushes, laying 3-5 eggs.
Oriental Hobby - The Oriental Hobby feeds mainly on insects. Its typical habitats are lowland forested areas and woodland. It nests in used nest of other birds either in trees, on building ledges or on cliffs.
Oriental Honey-buzzard - Despite its name, this species is not related to Buteo buzzards, and is taxonomically closer to the kites. It appears long-necked with a small head, and soars on flat wings. The head lacks a strong supraciliary ridge giving it a very un-raptor-like facial appearance. It has a long tail and a short head crest. It is brown above, but not as dark as Honey Buzzard, and paler below. There is a dark throat stripe. Unusually for a large bird of prey, the sexes can be distinguished. The male has a blue-grey head, while the female's head is brown. She is slightly larger and darker than the male. The male has a black tail with a white band, whilst the female resembles female Honey Buzzard.
Oriental Magpie-Robin - This species is 19 centimetres long, including the long tail that is usually held cocked upright. It is similar in shape to the smaller European Robin, but is longer-tailed. The male has black upperparts, head and throat apart from a white shoulder patch. The underparts and the sides of the long tail are white. Females are greyish black above and greyish white. Young birds have scaly brown upperparts and head.
Oriental Pied-Hornbill - The Oriental Pied Hornbill is a species of hornbill in the Bucerotidae family. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Republic of India, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. The Oriental Pied Hornbill's diet includes rambutans.
Oriental Pipit - It is found in open habitats, especially short grassland and cultivation. It builds its nest on the ground. Like other pipits, this species is insectivorous.
Oriental Plover - Adult male in breeding plumage: white face, throat and fore-crown; grey-brown hind-crown, hind-neck and back; belly white, demarcated with narrow black band and then broad chestnut breast band merging into white throat. Female, juvenile and non-breeding male: generally grey-brown upperparts and white belly; pale face with white streak above eye. Measurements: length 21-25 cm; wingspan 46-53 cm; weight 95 g.
Oriental Pratincole - Their most unusual feature of the pratincoles is that although classed as waders they typically hunt their insect prey on the wing like swallows, although they can also feed on the ground.
Oriental Turtle Dove - It has two distinctive races, S. o. orientalis in the central Siberian taiga, and S. o. meena in open woodland in central Asia. Two white eggs, as for all pigeons and doves, are laid in a twig nest in a tree.
Oriental white stork - At one time, the Oriental Stork could be found in Japan, China, Korea and Russia. It is now extinct in Japan and Korean peninsula. However, in May 2007 a hatchling was reported in Japan for the first time in 40 years in the wild. It was offspring of two storks who were bred in captivity. After breeding, the storks migrate to eastern China in September and return in March.
Oriental White-eye - The Oriental White-eye, Zosterops palpebrosus, is a small passerine bird in the white-eye family. It is a resident breeder in open woodland in tropical Asia east from India to China and Indonesia. They forage in small groups, feeding on nectar and small insects. They are easily identified by the distinctive white eye-ring and overall yellowish upperparts. Several populations of this widespread species are named subspecies and some have distinctive variations in the distribution and shades of yellows.
Oriente Warbler - Its natural habitats dry forests, lowland moist forests, montane moist forests, and xeric shrublands.
Orinoco Goose - This 61-76 cm long species is a resident breeder in the forests of tropical South America. Its preference is forest lakes or marshes with access to open woodland or savanna.
Orinoco Piculet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Orinoco Softtail - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Oriole Finch - The Oriole Finch is species of bird in the finch family Fringillidae. It is monotypic in the genus Linurgus.
Oriole Warbler - This skulking passerine is typically found in dense thickets usually near water. Oriole Warbler builds a large untidy nest suspended from palm leaves.
Ornate Flycatcher - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Ornate Fruit Dove - It is very beautiful because of the many colors of feathers they have.
Ornate Hawk-Eagle - This is a medium-large raptor, at about 58-64 cm in length, and weighing about 1200 g . It has a prominent pointed crest, raised when excited, a black bill, broad wings and a long rounded tail.
Ornate Lorikeet - The Ornate Lorikeet is a mainly green parrot about 25 cm long. Its head above its eyes is purple-blue and its face below its eyes is red. There is red at back of the head and yellow behind the eyes. It does not have a collar at the back of the neck that Rainbow Lorikeets have. Its chin to chest has transverse strips and bars of red and blue. Its abdomen is green with sparse variable yellow scalloping. The beak is orange-red, the irises are dark orange, the eye-ring is dark grey, and the legs are grey.
Ornate Melidectes - The Ornate Melidectes is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Ornate Tinamou - Nothoprocta kalinowskii
Orphean Warbler - At 15–16 cm length - somewhat larger than a Blackcap - this is one of the largest species of typical warblers. The adult males have a plain grey back and whitish underparts. The bill is long and pointed and the legs black. The male has a dark grey head, black eye mask and white throat. The iris is white. Females and immatures have a paler head and buff underparts; their grey back has a brownish tinge. The iris is dark in young birds. The song is a series of warbling liroo-liroo and scolding notes.
Orthonyx novaeguineae - The Papuan Logrunner or New Guinea Logrunner is a species of bird in the Orthonychidae family. It was formerly considered conspecific with the Australian Logrunner. It is found in New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Ortolan Bunting - A native of most European countries and western Asia the Ortolan migrates in autumn to tropical Africa, returning at the end of April or beginning of May. Its distribution throughout its breeding range seems to be very local, and for this no obvious reason can be assigned. It was said in France to prefer wine-growing districts; but it certainly does not feed upon grapes, and is found equally in countries where vineyards are unknown. It reaches as far north as Scandinavia and beyond the Arctic Circle, frequenting corn-fields and their neighbourhoods. It is an uncommon vagrant in spring and particularly autumn to the British Isles.
Osprey - The Osprey tolerates a wide variety of habitats, nesting in any location near a body of water providing an adequate food supply. It is found on all continents except Antarctica although in South America it occurs only as a non-breeding migrant.
Ostrich - The Ostrich, Struthio camelus, is a large flightless bird native to Africa. It is the only living species of its family, Struthionidae and its genus, Struthio. Ostriches share the order Struthioniformes with the kiwis, Emus, and other ratites. It is distinctive in its appearance, with a long neck and legs and the ability to run at maximum speeds of about 70 km/h , the top land speed of any bird. The Ostrich is the largest living species of bird and lays the largest egg of any living bird .
Otus enganensis - The Enggano Scops Owl is an owl endemic to Enggano Island, Indonesia.
Otus siaoensis - The Siau Scops Owl, Otus siaoensis is a critically endangered owl and may be extinct. They live on the island of Siau, north of Sulawesi, Indonesia and are forest dwellers. The species is only known from a single holotype from 1866 although there have been some local reports in recent years. Even so their population is being devastated by loss of habitat due to excessive logging of the forest on the island and there would be very few if any individuals left.
Oustalet's Tyrannulet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Oustalet's White-bellied Sunbird - The Oustalet's Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is found in Angola, Malawi, Tanzania, and Zambia.
Ouvea Parakeet - The Ouvea Parakeet or Uvea Parakeet, is a species of parrot in the Psittacidae family. It is endemic to the island of Uvea in the Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia. The species was once considered conspecific with the Horned Parakeet of Grande Terre, but they have now been split into two species.
Ovambo Sparrowhawk - The Ovambo or Ovampo Sparrowhawk is a species of bird of prey in the Accipitridae family. It is found in Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Ovenbird - It is the subject of the poem "The Oven Bird" by Robert Frost, published first 1916 in his poetry collection Mountain Interval.
Oystercatcher - This oystercatcher is the national bird of the Faroe Islands, where it is called tjaldur.

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