Birds beginning with H

Haartlaub - A small, squat bird; both sexes of this species have disproportionately large bills for their size . The bare parts are mostly a dull yellow; the large bill is a brownish yellow.
Hadada Ibis - The Hadada Ibis is found throughout open grasslands, savanna and rainforests of Sudan, Ethiopia, Senegal, Uganda, Tanzania, Gabon, Zaire, Cameroon, Gambia, Kenya, Somalia and South Africa, and also in urban parks and large gardens. It feeds mainly on earthworms, using its long scimitar-like bill to probe soft soil. It also eats larger insects, such as the Parktown Prawn, as well as spiders and small lizards. These birds also favour snails and will feed in garden beds around residential homes.
Hainan Blue-Flycatcher - The Hainan Blue-flycatcher is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Hainan Hill Partridge - The Hainan Partridge is a species of bird in the Phasianidae family. It is endemic to Hainan Island, China. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hainan Leaf Warbler - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hair-crested Drongo - This species was formerly considered conspecific with Dicrurus bracteatus, for which the name "Spangled Drongo" is now usually reserved. Some authorities consider it conspecific with the Sumatran Drongo .
Hairy Woodpecker - The Hairy Woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker, averaging approximately 250 mm in length with a 380 mm wingspan.
Hairy-backed Bulbul - Species: Brachypodius criniger Blyth, 1845 Myiosobus fulvicauda Reichenow, 1891 Trichophorus minutus
Hairy-breasted Barbet - The Hairy-breasted Barbet is a species of bird in the Ramphastidae family. It is found in Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, and Uganda.
Hairy-crested Antbird - The Hairy-crested Antbird is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Half-collared Kingfisher - The Half-collared Kingfisher Alcedo semitorquata is a species of kingfisher that feeds almost exclusively on fish and can be found near water at all times. It can be found on shores and around larger bodies of water in Southern and Eastern Africa.
Half-collared Sparrow - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Hall Babbler - Both its common and specific names commemorate Major Harold Wesley Hall, an Australian-born philanthropist who sponsored the British Museum's series of Harold Hall Australian Expeditions, which took place during the 1960s, and in the course of which the new babbler species was discovered.
Halmahera Cuckooshrike - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Hamerkop - Its plumage is a drab brown with purple iridescence on the back. The bill is long, flat, and slightly hooked.
Hammond's flycatcher - Adults have greyish-olive upperparts, darker on the wings and tail, with whitish underparts; they have a conspicuous white eye ring, white wing bars, a small bill and a short tail. The breast is washed with grey and the sides of the belly with yellow. Many species of Empidonax flycatchers look closely alike. The best way to distinguish species is by voice, by breeding habitat and/or range.
Handsome Flycatcher - The Handsome Flycatcher is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Handsome Francolin - The Handsome Francolin is distributed in mountain forests of eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, southwest Uganda and borders between Burundi and Rwanda. It is a shy and elusive bird, more often heard than seen. The diet consists mainly of seeds.
Handsome Fruiteater - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Hangnest Tody-Tyrant - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Happy Wren - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, and heavily degraded former forest.
Harlequin Antbird - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Harlequin Duck - The Harlequin Duck, Histrionicus histrionicus, is a small sea duck. In North America it is also known as Lords and ladies. Other names include painted duck, totem pole duck, rock duck, glacier duck, mountain duck, white-eyed diver, squeaker and blue streak.
Harlequin Quail - The Harlequin Quail is a species of bird in the Phasianidae family. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Oman, Rwanda, São Tomé and Príncipe, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Harpy Eagle - It is the largest and most powerful raptor found in America, and among the largest extant species of eagles in the world. It usually inhabits tropical lowland rainforests in the upper canopy layer.
Harris' sparrow - Their breeding habitat is the north part of central Canada . In fact, this bird is Canada's only endemic breeder. In the winter they migrate to the Great Plains states of the United States, from lower South Dakota to upper Texas.
Harris's Hawk - The Harris's Hawk or Harris Hawk, Parabuteo unicinctus, formerly known as the Bay-winged Hawk or Dusky Hawk, is a medium-large bird of prey which breeds from the southwestern United States south to Chile and central Argentina. Birds are sometimes reported at large in Western Europe, especially Britain, but it is a popular species in falconry and these records almost certainly all refer to escapes from captivity.
Hartlaub - It is found in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda.
Hartlaub - The Hartlaub's Gull or King Gull, is a small gull, which is a non-migratory breeding resident endemic to the Atlantic Ocean coastline of South Africa and Namibia. Although it is predominantly coastal or estuarine, it is not a pelagic species, and is rarely seen at sea far from land. It was formerly sometimes considered to be a subspecies of the Silver Gull , and, as is the case with many gulls, it has traditionally been placed in the genus Larus but is now placed in the genus Chroicocephalus.
Hartlaub's Duck - Analysis of mtDNA sequences of the cytochrome b and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 genes suggests that it belongs into a very distinct clade—possibly a subfamily of its own—together with the Blue-winged Goose, another African species of waterfowl with uncertain affinities.
Hauxwell's Thrush - The Hauxwell's Thrush is a species of bird in the Turdidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical swamps.
Hawaii creeper - The Hawaiʻi Creeper is similar to treecreepers in that it is able to climb up and down trees. It uses its short, sharp beak to probe bark for insects residing underneath. If available, it will sip nectar from koa or ʻōhiʻa lehua .
Hawaii mamo - This bird was black with orange-yellow feathers on its legs, primary feathers, on its bottom and near the tail. It had small beady black eyes and was the centerpiece of portraits for some years. This bird had a slightly curving blackish yellow bill and it was long, some three inches long. This shy species that lived in the forest canopy and fed on nectar of lobelia that possessed curved, tubular flowers. It's call was a long, plaintive whistle.
Hawaii Oo - The 'Hawaiʻi ʻŌʻō was first described by Blasius Merrem in 1786. It had an overall length of 32 centimetres , wing length of 11–11.5 centimetres , and tail length of up to 19 centimetres . The colour of its plumage was glossy black with a brown shading at the belly. It was further characterized by yellowish tufts at the axillaries. It had some yellowish plumes on its rump, but lacked yellow thigh feathers like the Molokaʻi ʻŌʻō, and also lacked the whitish edgings on its tail feathers like the Oʻahu ʻŌʻō. However it had the largest yellow plumes on its wings out of all the species of ʻŌʻō.
Hawaiian coot - The first reference to a coot in the Hawaiian Islands was by Andrew Bloxam, who saw it, although he did not collect a specimen, while in the islands in 1825 as the naturalist on board HMS Blonde. He mistook it for the Eurasian Coot, Fulica atra. It is now considered either to be a separate species, Fulica alai, or a subspecies of the American Coot, Fulica americana alai.
Hawaiian Crake - The Hawaiian Rail , Hawaiian Spotted Rail, or Hawaiian Crake was a somewhat enigmatic species of diminutive rail that lived on Big Island of Hawaiʻi, but is now extinct. It was a flightless bird that was apparently found in shrubland and secondary growth on abandoned fields and in times of danger had the habit of hiding in Polynesian Rat burrows. Specimens are known or assumed to be from an area which roughly corresponds to the middle elevations of today's Puna district around the present settlement of Mountain View, below the primary rainforest. A dark form and a lighter, spotted one are known .
Hawaiian goose - The Nēnē evolved from the Canada Goose , which most likely migrated to the Hawaiian islands 500,000 years ago, shortly after the island of Hawaiʻi was formed. This ancestor is the progenitor of the Nēnē as well as the prehistoric Giant Hawaiʻi Goose
Hawaiian Petrel - The petrel was formerly found on all the main Hawaiian Islands except Niʻihau, but today it is mostly restricted to Haleakalā crater on Maui; smaller populations exist on Mauna Loa on the island of Hawaiʻi, Waimea Canyon on the island of Kauaʻi, Lānaʻihale on Lānaʻi, and possibly Molokaʻi.
Hawaiian Stilt - The Black-necked Stilt is a locally abundant shorebird of American wetlands and coastlines. It is found from the coastal areas of California through much of the interior western United States and along the Gulf of Mexico as far east as Florida, then south through Central America and the Caribbean to NW Brazil SW Peru, E Ecuador and the Galápagos Islands. The northernmost populations, particularly those from inland, are migratory, wintering from the extreme south of the USA to southern Mexico, rarely as far south as Costa Rica; on the Baja California peninsula it is only found regularly in winter.
Hawfinch - This bird breeds across Europe and temperate Asia. It is mainly resident in Europe, but many Asian birds migrate further south in the winter. It is a rare vagrant to the western islands of Alaska.
Hazel Grouse - The Hazel Grouse or Hazel Hen is one of the smaller members of the grouse family of birds. It is a sedentary species, breeding across northern Eurasia and central and eastern Europe in dense, damp, mixed coniferous woodland, preferably with some spruce.
Hazel-fronted Pygmy Tyrant - The Hazel-fronted Pygmy-tyrant is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Bolivia and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Heart-spotted Woodpecker - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Heermann's gull - This species looks distinctly different from other gulls. Adults have a medium gray body, blackish-gray wings and tail with white edges, and a red bill with a black tip. The head is dusky gray in non-breeding plumage and white in breeding plumage. Immatures resemble non-breeding adults but are darker and browner, and the bill is flesh-colored or pink till the second winter. A few birds, no more than 1 in 200, have white primary coverts, which form a showy spot on the upper wing.
Heinrich's Brush Cuckoo - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Heinroth's Shearwater - Heinroth's Shearwater is a poorly known seabird in the family Procellariidae. Probably a close relative of the Little Shearwater or Audubon's Shearwater , it is distinguished by a long and slender bill and a brown-washed underside.
Helicolestes hamatus - The Slender-billed Kite, Helicolestes hamatus, is a bird of prey in the family Accipitridae, which also includes the eagles, hawks and Old World vultures. It is found near water in forested parts of tropical northern and central South America, and far eastern Panama. Both genders resemble the male Snail Kite, and the Slender-billed Kite has often been included in the same genus, Rostrhamus. Adults always have yellow eyes and the all-dark tail is noticeably shorter than in the Snail Kite. Immatures resemble adults, but have brownish eyes and three narrow white bands in the tail. As in the Snail Kite, the unusually shaped bill is an adaption for feeding on aquatic snails, and while it sometimes takes crabs, it mainly feeds on snails of the genus Pomacea.
Hellmayr's Pipit - The Hellmayr's Pipit is a species of bird in the Motacillidae family. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay. Its natural habitats are temperate grassland, subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland, and pastureland.
Helmet Bird - It is restricted to lowland and lower montane rainforests in north-east Madagascar.
Helmeted Curassow - The Northern Helmeted Curassow, Pauxi pauxi is a large terrestrial black curassow with a small head, large bluish grey casque on forehead, red bill, white-tipped tail feathers, greenish glossed mantle and breast feathers, and white below. Both sexes are similar. The male, at 3.6 kg , is larger than the female, at 2.6 kg . Some rare rufous morph female has a black barred and reddish brown plumage. For some time, it also contained the Southern Helmeted Curassow taxa as subspecies and was simply known as the Helmeted Curassow. Nowadays its southern congener is considered a distinct species P. unicornis.
Helmeted Guineafowl - It breeds in warm, fairly dry and open habitats with scattered shrubs and trees such as savanna or farmland. The nest is a well-hidden, generally unlined scrape and a clutch is normally 6-12 eggs which the female incubates for 26-28 days. Nests containing larger numbers of eggs are generally believed to be the result of more than one hen using the nest; eggs are large and an incubating bird could not realistically cover significantly more than a normal clutch. Domestic birds at least, are notable for producing extremely thick-shelled eggs that are reduced to fragments as the chicks hatch, rather than leaving two large sections and small chips from where any chick has removed the end of the egg. The chicks are cryptically coloured and rapid wing growth enables them to flutter onto low branches barely a week after hatching. These guineafowl live as long as 12 years in the wild.
Helmeted Hornbill - The Helmeted Hornbill, Rhinoplax vigil, is a very large bird in the hornbill family. It is found in the Malay peninsula, Sumatra and Borneo.
Helmeted Manakin - The Helmeted Manakin is a dimorphic species with the male being a black bird with a red crest; the female is a dull olivish green, with a reduced olive crest.
Helmeted Myna - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montanes, and swamps. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Helmeted Woodpecker - The Helmeted Woodpecker is a species of bird in the Picidae family. It is found in Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hemprich's Hornbill - The Hemprich's Hornbill is a species of hornbill in the Bucerotidae family. It is found in Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, and Uganda.
Hen Harrier - The Hen Harrier or Northern Harrier is a bird of prey. It breeds throughout the northern parts of the northern hemisphere in Canada and the northernmost USA, and in northern Eurasia. This species is polytypic, with two subspecies. Marsh Hawk is a colloquial name for the American form.
Henderson fruit-dove - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Henderson Island Crake - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Henderson Island Reed-Warbler - The Henderson Reed-warbler is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found only in Pitcairn. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Henderson petrel - During Captain Cook's voyages in the eighteenth century, Daniel Solander wrote in his manuscript of the procuring of a petrel which he named Procellaria atrata. It was not until 1912, when Gregory Mathews published Solander's account, and created this name . However, Mathews did not actually designate a new type, as what Solander had described was considered to be merely hypothetical.
Henderson's Ground Jay - The bird is light tan with iridescent blue on its primary feathers. It has a long, curved beak and a black stripe on its forehead.
Henicorhina negreti - The bird is found on the Munchique Massif in the western Andes in the Chocó Endemic Bird Area, Colombia.
Henna-hooded Foliage-gleaner - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Henslow's sparrow - Adults have streaked brown upperparts with a light brown breast with streaks, a white belly and a white throat. They have a pale stripe on the crown with a dark stripe on each side, an olive face and neck, rust-coloured wings and a short dark forked tail.
Henst's Goshawk - It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hepatic Tanager - The Hepatic Tanager, Piranga flava, is a medium-sized American songbird. Formerly placed in the tanager family , it and other members of its genus are now classified in the cardinal family . The species's plumage and vocalizations are similar to other members of the cardinal family.
Hermit Ibis - The Northern Bald Ibis was once widespread across the Middle East, northern Africa and southern Europe, with a fossil record dating back at least 1.8 million years. It disappeared from Europe over 300 years ago, and is now considered critically endangered. There are believed to be about 500 wild birds remaining in southern Morocco, and fewer than 10 in Syria, where it was rediscovered in 2002. To combat these ebbing numbers, recent reintroduction programs have been instituted internationally, with a semi-wild breeding colony in Turkey, as well as sites in Austria, Spain and northern Morocco.
Hermit Thrush - The Hermit Thrush is a medium-sized North American thrush. It is not very closely related to the other North American migrant species of Catharus, but rather to the Mexican Russet Nightingale-thrush.
Hermit Warbler - Mature Hermit Warblers normally grow to be 4½ to 5 inches long. Hermit Warblers are dark gray in coloration on top, and white below, and their flanks are streaked with black. The wings have two diagonal white wing bars. The majority of the Hermit Warbler's head is yellow, and males have a dark black throat, while females have much less black on their throat bib and immature birds have no black throat.
Herpsilochmus dugandi - The Dugand's Antwren is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Herpsilochmus gentryi - The Ancient Antwren is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Herpsilochmus sellowi - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and dry savanna. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Heterophasia desgodinsi - It is found in China, Laos and Vietnam. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Heude's Parrotbill - The northern subspecies P. h. polivanovi is sometimes regarded as a separate species, the Northern Parrotbill.
Heuglin's Bustard - Heuglin's Bustard Neotis heuglinii is a species of bird in the Otididae family. It is found in Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, and Somalia.
Heuglin's Masked Weaver - The Heuglin's Masked-weaver is a species of bird in the Ploceidae family. It is found in Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, Togo, and Uganda.
Heuglin’s Francolin - The Heuglin's Francolin is a species of bird in the Phasianidae family. It is found in Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan, and Uganda.
Highland Elaenia - It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay.
Highland Guan - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forest. Its population has declined much in recent times: Listed as a species of Least Concern in 1994, it was uplisted to Near Threatened in 2000 and, as it was determined to be less common than previously believed, to Vulnerable in the 2007 IUCN Red List.
Highland Tinamou - Tinamus bonapartei
Hildebrandt - The Hildebrandt's Francolin is a species of bird in the Phasianidae family. It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia. The species is named for Johannes Hildebrandt, who collected the first specimens in Kenya.
Hildebrandt's Starling - Hildebrandt's Starling is found in Kenya and Tanzania, where it occupies open country between 500–2,200 m . Its habitat is open woodland and open thornbrush country. The species is often recorded as being uncommon, but it varies from being fairly common to fairly uncommon. It is not considered threatened by the IUCN, and is listed as least concern. Its habitat is not threatened and it occurs in a number of protected areas.
Hill Prinia - The Hill Prinia is a species of bird in the Cisticolidae family. It is found in Bhutan, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Hill Swallow - This species is a small swallow at 13 cm. It has a blue back with browner wings and tail, a red face and throat, and dusky underparts. It differs from Barn Swallow and the closely-related Welcome Swallow in its shorter and less forked tail.
Hill-forest Honeyeater - The Hill-forest Honeyeater is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Himalayan Bulbul - It is found in Afghanistan, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Iraq, Tajikistan, and Saudi Arabia.
Himalayan cuckoo - It was formerly known as "Oriental Cuckoo" and contained several subspecies found over most of Asia. In 2005, it was determined that this "species" constitutes of three distinct lineages:
Himalayan Flameback - The Himalayan Flameback is a species of bird in the Picidae family. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, and Nepal. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Himalayan Griffon - Adults are 103-110 cm long, have a wingspan of 260-289 cm across the wings and weigh 8–12 kg . They are the second largest Old World vulture, behind only the Cinereous Vulture in size.
Himalayan Monal - Recently, survey carried out in Arunachal Pradesh discovered a new type of Lophophorus species and its identity, though believed to be a subspecies of Sclater's Monal or a potential new species, is yet to be confirmed. There is, so far, no confirmed record of subspecies in the Himalayan Monal. However, recent studies have shown that the male Himalayan Monals of northwestern India lack the white rump that many Himalayan Monals have, and have more green on the breast, indicating the possibility of a second subspecies.
Himalayan Quail - The Himalayan Quail is a medium-sized quail belonging to the pheasant family. It was last reported in 1876 and is feared extinct. This species was known from only 2 locations in the western Himalayas in Uttarakhand, north-west India. The last verifiable record was in 1876.
Himalayan Snowcock - It is endemic to the Himalayan Mountains of Pakistan, where it breeds at altitudes from 3600–5100 m on bare stony mountains. It nests in a bare ground scrape and lays typically 5-10 eggs, which are incubated only by the female. Both parents raise the young. Its food is seeds and vegetable matter. Himalayan Snowcock fly downslope in the morning and feed as they walk uphill as the day wears on. It forms small flocks when not breeding.
Himalayan Woodpecker - Its natural habitats are boreal forests and temperate forests.
Hinde's Pied-Babbler - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, arable land, and plantations. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hippolais opaca - It is a small passerine bird, found in dry open country, including cultivation, with bushes or some trees. 2-3 eggs are laid in a nest in low in undergrowth or a bush. Like most warblers, Western Olivaceous is insectivorous.
Hispaniolan Amazon - The main features that differentiate the Hispaniolan parrot from other amazons are the white forehead, pale beak, white eye-ring, blue ear patch, and red belly.
Hispaniolan crossbill - It was formerly regarded as conspecific with the Two-barred Crossbill , from which it is now assumed it evolved.
Hispaniolan Macaw - A pair was kept in the royal menagerie at Schönbrunn Palace, Vienna, Austria from 1760.
Hispaniolan parakeet - The bird is a medium-sized parakeet, evenly colored green, with a long and pointed tail, pale beak and legs, white eye-ring and red patch on the wing's wrist area. Sexes are identical; the bird is highly gregarious, forming flocks which can surpass several dozen individuals. The only similar bird in its native range is the possibly introduced Olive-throated Parakeet, from which it can be readily differentiated mainly by wing patches that are blue, instead of red.
Hispaniolan Pewee - The Hispaniolan Pewee is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found on the island of Hispaniola in the Caribbean.
Hispaniolan Trogon - The Hispaniolan Trogon is a species of bird in the Trogonidae family. It is the national bird of Haiti. It is found on the island of Hispaniola shared by Haiti and the neighboring Dominican Republic. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and what is now heavily degraded forest. It is threatened by habitat loss. It has been sighted in the upper altitudes in the forests of Haiti's mountain ranges and is confined to several areas in the country's protected areas.
Hispaniolan Woodpecker - Their back is covered in yellow and black stripes. Males have a dark red stripe from their forehead to their neck while females the red stripe extends from the nape to the neck only. Their tail base is brilliantly red while the tail itself is black. The rump is olive-grey.
Hoary Puffleg - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Hoary Redpoll - The Greenland race is a very large and pale bird, with the male sometimes described as a "snowball", but both forms are pale with small beaks, white rumps and often more yellow than grey-brown tones in their plumage. The females are more streaked on their breasts, sides and rumps, but are still pale.
Hoary-headed Grebe - The bird takes its name from the silvery-white streaking on its black head. It is common in Australia, with a population of about 500,000. Its habitat is similar to that of the Australasian Grebe.
Hoary-throated Barwing - It is found in Bhutan, China, India, and Nepal. Its natural habitats are temperate forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Hoary-throated Spinetail - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hoatzin - The Hoatzin was originally described by German zoologist Statius Müller in 1776.
Hobby - This species breeds across Europe and Asia. It is a long-distance migrant, wintering in Africa.
Hodgson - The Hodgson's Hawk-cuckoo, Cuculus fugax is a species of cuckoo found in south, east and southeast Asia.
Hodgson's Bushchat - Hodgson's Bushchat breeds in the alpine or sub-alpine meadows and scrub in the mountains of Mongolia and adjacent parts of Russia. It winters in the Terai of Nepal and northern India in wet and dry grasslands, reeds and tamarisks along riverbeds, and also in sugarcane fields.
Hodgson's Grandala - It is found in Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, and Nepal.
Hodgson's Pipit - The Rosy Pipit is a species of bird in the Motacillidae family. It is found in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, South Korea, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Republic of India, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Hoffmann's Woodcreeper - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Hoffmann's Woodpecker - The adult Hoffmann's Woodpecker is 18 cm long and weighs 68g. Its upperparts and wings are neatly barred with black and white, and it has a white rump. The underparts are pale buff-grey with a yellow central belly patch. The male has a white forehead, red crown, and yellow nape. The female has a white crown and forehead and reduced yellow nape. Young birds are duller, have less white above and less yellow on the belly.
Honeyguide Greenbul - The Honeyguide Greenbul is a species of songbird in the Pycnonotidae family. It is found in Angola, Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Togo, Uganda, and Zambia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Hood Mockingbird - The Hood Mockingbird or Española Mockingbird is a species of bird in the Mimidae family. It is endemic to Española Island in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador and is a member of the Galápagos mockingbirds, four closely related species endemic to the island chain. It is found in dry forests and is omnivorous, though it primarily is a carnivore or scavenger. The species has a highly territorial social structure and has no fear of humans.
Hooded Antpitta - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hooded Berryeater - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Hooded Butcherbird - The Hooded Butcherbird was first described by Dutch naturalist Pieter Boddaert in 1783, its specific epithet cassicus derived from the Latin "wearing a helmet" or "hood". It is one of six members of the genus Cracticus known as butcherbirds. Two subspecies are recognised; The nominate race cassicus is found on mainland New Guinea and islands to the west, as well as Kairiru, Mushu and Basilaki Islands, while the larger race hercules occurs on the D'entrecasteaux Archipelago and Trobriand Islands.
Hooded crane - The Hooded Crane breeds in south-central and south-eastern Siberia. Breeding is also suspected in Mongolia. Over 80% of its population winters at Izumi, southern Japan. There are also wintering grounds in South Korea and China.
Hooded Crow - The Carrion Crow was one of the many species originally described by Linnaeus in his 18th century work Systema Naturae and it still bears its original name of Corvus corone.
Hooded Cuckooshrike - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Hooded Gnateater - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Hooded Grebe - The Hooded Grebe , is a medium-sized grebe found in the southern region of South America. It grows to about 34 cm in length, and is black and white in color . It is found in isolated lakes in the most remote parts of Patagonia, and spends winters along the coast of the same region.
Hooded Grosbeak - The Hooded Grosbeak is a passerine bird found in the highlands of Central America, principally in Mexico.
Hooded Merganser - The Hooded Merganser is a small duck and is the only member of the genus Lophodytes.
Hooded Monarch - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Hooded Munia - The Hooded Munia is a small munia. It is whitish below, brown above and has a golden to orange rump. It is unlikely to be confused with other birds in its range. The juvenile is similar in appearance to the much larger in size juvenile Grand Mannikin L. grandis.
Hooded Parrot - An Australian endemic, the Hooded Parrot inhabits to semi-arid areas of northeast Northern Territory. It nests in a termite mound. The female lays two to four white eggs. The diet consists mainly of seeds, berries and vegetables.
Hooded Pitohui - This species and its two close relatives, the Variable Pitohui and the Brown Pitohui, were the first documented poisonous birds. A neurotoxin called homobatrachotoxin found in the birds' skin and feathers, causes numbness and tingling in those touching the bird.
Hooded Pitta - Hooded Pittas can reach a length of 16 to 19 cm and a weight of 42 to 70 g. Their diet consists of various insects , which they hunt on the ground, and berries. In the breeding period, which lasts from February to August, they build nests on the ground; both parent take care of the eggs and the fledglings. They are highly territorial and their fluty double-noted whistle calls can be constantly heard from their territories, sometimes throughout the nights.
Hooded Racquet-tailed Tree Pie - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hooded Robin - Like all Australian Robins, it is not closely related to either the European Robin or the American Robin, but belongs rather to the Corvida parvorder comprising many tropical and Australian passerines including pardalotes, Fairy-wrens and honeyeaters as well as crows. Initially thought to be related to flycatchers, it was described as Muscicapa cucullata by ornithologist John Latham in 1802. it was later placed in the genus Petroica for many years before being transferred to Melanodryas.
Hooded Seedeater - This has a length of eleven centimetres and is so oddly patterned that some scientists regard it variously as either a hybrid or an abnormal specimen of the Yellow-bellied Seedeater . The bird had a black crest and throat. The upperparts are olive. The underparts show a dingy buff. In contrast, the Yellow-bellied Seedeater has pale yellow underparts and the black coloring extends to the upperbreast.
Hooded Siskin - The Hooded Siskin is a small passerine bird in the finch family , native to South America. It belongs to the putative clade of Neotropical siskins in the genus Carduelis sensu stricto.
Hooded Tinamou - The Hooded Tinamou Nothocercus nigrocapillus is a type of ground bird found in forests of Bolivia and Peru.
Hooded Visorbearer - The Hooded Visorbearer, Colibri Lumachelle, or ColibrÍ Lumaquela is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found only in Brazil. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hooded Vulture - It breeds in a stick nest in trees in much of Africa south of the Sahara, laying one egg. Birds may form loose colonies. The population is mostly resident. One of the smaller vultures of the old world with a length of 70cm, a wingspan of 210cm and an average weight of 2.12kg
Hooded Warbler - The Hooded Warbler has a plain olive/green-brown back, and yellow underparts. Their outer rectrices have whitish vanes. Males have black hoods which surround their yellow faces; the female has an olive-green cap which does not extend to the forehead, ears and throat instead. Males attain their hood at about 9–12 months of age; younger birds are essentially identical to females. The song is a series of musical notes which sound like: wheeta wheeta whee-tee-oh, for which a common pneumonic is "The red, The red T-shirt". The call of these birds is a loud chip.
Hooded Wheatear - This 15.5-17 cm long bird is a resident breeder in unvegetated desert from eastern Egypt through the Arabian peninsula to Iran and Pakistan. It has occurred as a wanderer to Cyprus. The nest is built in a rock crevice, and 3-6 eggs is the normal clutch.
Hooded Yellowthroat - It is resident in dense semiarid to humid montane shrubland or chaparral.
Hook-billed hummingbird - The Hook-Billed Hermit is an endangered species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found in humid forest in eastern Brazil, with recent records from the states of Espírito Santo and Bahia only. It resembles the far commoner Rufous-breasted Hermit, but has a straighter bill and lacks rufous in the tail. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Hook-billed Kingfisher - The Hook-billed Kingfisher is a species of bird in the Alcedinidae family. It is the only species within the genus Melidora. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Hook-billed kite - The critically endangered Cuban Kite, C. wilsonii, is considered by some authors to be a subspecies of the Hook-billed Kite.
Hoot Owl - The Barred Owl is a large typical owl. It goes by many other names, including eight hooter, rain owl, wood owl, and striped owl, but is probably known best as the hoot owl.
Horned Coot - This species of coot was described by Bonaparte in 1853 based on a specimen collected in the Andes of Bolivia. For long it was known only from this type specimen. It is generally a low-density species and the total population has been estimated at 10.000-20.000, with as few as 620 in the Chilean part of its range.
Horned Curassow - The Southern Helmeted Curassow is a species of bird in the Cracidae family. It is found in Bolivia and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Horned guan - The only member in monotypic genus Oreophasis, the Horned Guan is distributed in humid mountain forests of southeast Mexico- and Guatemala of Central America. It is found in altitude up to 3,350 metres. Its diet consists mainly of fruits, green leaves and invertebrates. The female usually lays up to two eggs.
Horned Lark - The Shore Lark , called the Horned Lark in North America, breeds across much of North America from the high Arctic south to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, northernmost Europe and Asia and in the mountains of southeast Europe. There is also an isolated population on a plateau in Colombia. It is mainly resident in the south of its range, but northern populations of this passerine bird are migratory, moving further south in winter.
Horned Parakeet - The Horned Parakeet lives humid pine forests on New Caledonia, especially when Agathis and Araucaria pines are present. They live in pairs or small flocks and forage for seeds and nuts in the canopy. It nests both on the ground and in trees.
Horned puffin - The yellow bill plate grows before the breeding season and is shed later. They have a small fleshy black "horn" above their eyes. They have a white face with a dark line extending from the back of the eye and red feet.
Horned Screamer - They are related to the ducks, geese and swans, which are in the family Anatidae, but have bills looking more like those of game birds.
Horus Swift - It also occurs very discontinuously in much of the rest of the sub-Saharan region, with the Ethiopian mountains and the area from central Kenya into Uganda having large populations. Identification difficulties confuse the limits of this species’ range.
Hottentot Buttonquail - It is found in open grassland through much of Africa outside the forested and more arid regions. It is resident in the central parts of the range but is a migratory breeder further north.
Hottentot Teal - The Hottentot Teal breed year round, depending on rainfall, and stay in small groups or pairs. They build nests above water in tree stumps and use vegetation. This species is omnivorous and prefers smaller shallow bodies of water.
Houbara Bustard - The Houbara Bustard is 60 cm long with an 140 cm wingspan. It is brown above and white below, with a black stripe down the sides of its neck. In flight, the long wings show large areas of black and brown on the flight feathers. It is slightly smaller and darker than Macqueen's Bustard. The sexes are similar, but the female is smaller and greyer above.
House Bunting - It is a resident breeder of dry country from northeast Africa , east through southwest Asia to northwestern India. Its natural food consists of insects when feeding young, and otherwise seeds.
House Finch - The House Finch is a bird in the finch family Fringillidae. This species and the other "American rosefinches" are usually placed in the rosefinch genus Carpodacus. It has been proposed to place them in a distinct genus Burrica, but the American Ornithologists Union rejected a proposal to do so in 2008.
House Martin - The Common House Martin , sometimes called the Northern House Martin or, particularly in Europe, just House Martin, is a migratory passerine bird of the swallow family which breeds in Europe, north Africa and temperate Asia; and winters in sub-Saharan Africa and tropical Asia. It feeds on insects which are caught in flight, and it migrates to climates where flying insects are plentiful. It has a blue head and upperparts, white rump and pure white underparts, and is found in both open country and near human habitation. It is similar in appearance to the two other martin species of the Delichon genus, which are both endemic to eastern and southern Asia. It has two accepted subspecies.
House Swift - These birds have very short legs which they use only for clinging to vertical surfaces. The scientific name comes from the Greek απους, apous, meaning "without feet". They never settle voluntarily on the ground.
Hova Lark - The range of the Madagascar Lark is large, with an estimated global Extent of Occurrence between 100,000 and 1,000,000 km2.
Huallaga Tanager - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Huayco Tinamou - All tinamous are from the family Tinamidae, and in the larger scheme are also ratites. Unlike other ratites, tinamous can fly, although in general, they are not strong fliers. All ratites evolved from prehistoric flying birds, and Tinamous are the closest living relative of these birds.
Hudson's Black Tyrant - It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Hudson's Canastero - Hudson's Canastero is a species of bird in the Furnariidae family. It is found in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Its natural habitat is temperate grassland. It is named after Argentine-British ornithologist William Henry Hudson.
Hudsonian Godwit - Adults have long dark legs and a long pink bill with a slight upward curve and dark at the tip. The upper parts are mottled brown and the underparts are chestnut. The tail is black and the rump is white. They show black wing linings in flight.
Huia - The Huia, was a species of New Zealand Wattlebird endemic to the North Island of New Zealand. It became extinct in the early 20th century, primarily as a result of overhunting and widespread habitat destruction, and partially due to collection for museums. The last confirmed sighting was on 28 December 1907 when WW.
Humblot's Sunbird - The Humblot's Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is endemic to the islands of Grand Comoro and Mohéli in the Comoros. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Humboldt Penguin - Humboldt Penguins are medium-sized penguins, growing to 65-70 cm long and a weight of 3.6-5.9 kg . They have a black head with a white border running from behind the eye, around the black ear-coverts and chin, to join on the throat. They have blackish-grey upperparts and whitish underparts, with a black breast-band extending down the flanks to the thigh. They have a fleshy-pink base to the bill. Juveniles have dark heads and no breast-band. They have spines on their tongue which they use to hold their prey.
Humboldt's Sapphire - The Humboldt's Sapphire is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Panama. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.
Hume's Blue-throated Barbet - The Moustached Barbet is a resident breeder in the hills of Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. It is a species of broadleaf evergreen forest from 600-700 m. It nests in a tree hole.
Hume's Owl - This species is a part of the larger grouping of owls known as typical owls, Strigidae, which contains most species of owl. The other grouping is the barn owls, Tytonidae.
Hume's Short-toed Lark - The Hume's Lark is a species of lark in the Alaudidae family. It is found in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Iran, Israel, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Pakistan, Republic of India, Russia, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan.
Hume's Whitethroat - Unlike many typical warblers, the sexes are almost identical. This is a small species with a grey back, whitish underparts, a grey head with a darker "bandit mask" through the eyes and a white throat. It is slightly smaller than the Whitethroat, and lacks the chestnut wings and uniform head-face color of that species. The Lesser Whitethroat's song is a fast and rattling sequence of tet or che calls, quite different from the Whitethroat's scolding song.
Hunter's Cisticola - The Hunter's Cisticola is a species of bird in the Cisticolidae family. It is found in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.
Hunter's Sunbird - The Hunter's Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is found in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda.
Huon Astrapia - This little known bird of paradise is distributed and endemic to the mountain forests of Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. Its diet consists mainly of fruits and seeds.
Huon Melidectes - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Huon Melipotes - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Hutton's greenlet - It is found from southern British Columbia in Canada to central Guatemala in Central America. Recent DNA studies suggest this species may be split into at least 2 different species, with coastal Pacific birds showing enough genetic variation when compared to interior ones.
Hutton's Shearwater - It is an endemic breeder of New Zealand, with breeding restricted to only two remaining colonies in the Kaikoura Seaward Ranges, Kaikoura. During the non-breeding winter months migration occurs to South Australia. Some anecdotal evidence suggests pre-breeding birds circumnavigate Australia in the years leading up to sexual maturity.
Hwamei - The Chinese Hwamei or Melodious Laughingthrush is a passerine bird of eastern Asia in the Old World babbler family, Timaliidae. The name "Hwamei" comes from the Chinese 画眉 and means "painted eyebrow" referring to the distinctive marking around the bird's eyes. The species is a popular cagebird because of its attractive song.
Hyacinth Macaw - The Hyacinth Macaw is 100 cm long and 1.5–2 kg in weight. The wingspan is 120–140 cm . It is almost entirely blue and has black under the wings. It has a large black beak with bright yellow along the sides of the lower part of the beak and also yellow circling its eyes. The female and male are nearly indistinguishable, although the female is typically a bit more slender.
Hyacinth Visorbearer - It is found only in Brazil. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Hylacola pyrrhopygia - Chestnut-rumped Heathwren are not listed as threatened on the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.
Hylexetastes brigidai - The Brigida's Woodcreeper , also known as the Mato Grosso Woodcreeper, is a species of bird in the Dendrocolaptinae subfamily. It is often considered a subspecies of the Red-billed Woodcreeper. It is endemic to humid forests in the eastern Amazon in Brazil.
Hylexetastes uniformis - It is found in humid forest in the south-central Amazon of Bolivia and Brazil.
Hylopezus auricularis - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Hylophylax punctulatus - The Dot-backed Antbird is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical swamps.
Hypocnemis ochrogyna - The Rondonia Warbling Antbird, Hypocnemis ochrogyna, is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. Until recently, it was considered a subspecies of Hypocnemis cantator, but based on vocal differences and to a lesser degree differences in plumages it has been recommended treating them as separate species. As presently defined, the Rondonia Warbling Antbird is monotypic.
Hypocnemis peruviana - The Peruvian Warbling Antbird, Hypocnemis peruviana, is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. Until recently, it was considered a subspecies of Hypocnemis cantator, but based on vocal differences and to a lesser degree differences in plumages it has been recommended treating them as separate species. As presently defined, the Peruvian Warbling Antbird includes a single subspecies, saturata.
Hypocnemis striata - Spix's Warbling Antbird, Hypocnemis striata, is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. Until recently, it was considered a subspecies of Hypocnemis cantator, but based on vocal differences and to a lesser degree differences in plumage, it has been recommended treating them as separate species. As presently defined, Spix's Warbling Antbird includes two subspecies, H. s. implicata and H. s. affinis. The westernmost population is likely to represent an undescribed subspecies. Spix's Warbling Antbird is found at lower levels in humid forest in the south-eastern Amazon of Brazil.

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