Birds beginning with M

M - The Menetries's Warbler is 12 to 14 cm long with a wingspan of 15 to 19 cm and weighs about 9-11 grams. Its fairly long tail is blackish with white on the outer-feathers and is often held cocked. It is frequently wagged up and down or from side to side. The bill is fairly heavy and is dark with a pinkish patch at the base. There is a pale bare ring around the eye.
Macaroni Penguin - The Macaroni Penguin is a species of penguin found from the Subantarctic to the Antarctic Peninsula. One of six species of crested penguin, it is very closely related to the Royal Penguin, and some authorities consider the two to be a single species. It bears a distinctive yellow crest, and the face and upperparts are black and sharply delineated from the white underparts. Adults weigh on average 5.5 kg and are 70 cm in length. The male and female are similar in appearance although the male is slightly larger with a relatively larger bill. Like all penguins, it is flightless, with a streamlined body and wings stiffened and flattened into flippers for a marine lifestyle.
Maccoa Duck - Adult males have a chestnut body, a blue bill and a black head. Adult females have a grey-brown body, with a dark grey bill and a dark brown crown, nape and cheek stripe.
Macconnell's Flycatcher - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Macconnell's Spinetail - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montanes, and heavily degraded former forest.
Macgillivray's Warbler - The MacGillivray's Warbler was named by John James Audubon in honor of Scottish ornithologist William MacGillivray, although the proper credit to its discovery goes to John Kirk Townsend. The scientific name "tolmiei" was given in honor of William Fraser Tolmie.
Macgregor - A monogamous species, it inhabits subalpine forests of New Guinea. The diet consists mainly of fruits. This puzzling and little-known species has traditionally been considered a bird-of-paradise, but is actually a honeyeater. Recent genetic evidence on the Macgregor's Giant Honeyeater confirms that it belongs to the Meliphagidae family . It is similar and closely related to the Smoky Honeyeater.
Macgregor's Gardener Bowerbird - The polygamous male builds a tower-like "maypole-type" bower, with a central pole of twigs surrounded by a dish of moss with raised walls approximately 1 meter in diameter. He decorates the twigs of the maypole with flowers, fruits, insects and other objects. The diet consists mainly of fruits and insects. Bowerbirds are positioned roughly in the middle of the continuum of the "transfer effect" phenomenon observed among the different bowerbird species, whereby brilliant plumage evolves to more drab colors, while ornamentation is "transferred" to the behavior of creating elaborate bowers to demonstrate robust health instead.
Mackinlay's Cuckoo-Dove - The Mackinlay's Cuckoo-dove is a species of bird in the Columbidae family. It is found in Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu.
Mackinnon's Shrike - It is found in Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda.
Macklot's Sunbird - The Copper-throated Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is found in Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.
Macleay's Honeyeater - The Macleay's Honeyeater, Xanthotis macleayanus, is an endemic to Australian Honeyeater. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Macronyx sharpei - It is 16-17 cm long, with upperparts heavily marked with buff and rufous streaks, yellow underparts, and white outertail feathers in flight.
Madagascar Baza - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Madagascar Blue Pigeon - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Madagascar Brush-Warbler - The Madagascar Brush-Warbler is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found in Comoros and Madagascar. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and subtropical or tropical moist shrubland.
Madagascar Bulbul - It is found on the Comoros, Madagascar, Mayotte, and the Seychelles.
Madagascar Buttonquail - The Madagascar Buttonquail is a species of bird in the Turnicidae family. It is endemic to Madagascar.
Madagascar Buzzard - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Madagascar Coucal - The Malagasy Coucal or Madagascar Coucal is a species of cuckoo in the Cuculidae family. It is found in Madagascar, the Comoros and the Seychelles where it occurs on Aldabra and formerly on Assumption Island and Cosmoledo. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.
Madagascar Cuckoo - The Madagascar Cuckoo is a species of cuckoo in the Cuculidae family. It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Madagascar, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa, Uganda, and Zambia.
Madagascar Fish Eagle - Its closest relative is the African Fish-eagle, Haliaeetus vocifer. Together, they form a distinct species pair lineage of sea-eagles, which separated soon after the divergence of the genus; they retain the ancestral dark beak, talon, and eye, but unlike other Haliaeetus species, they always have at least partially white tails, even while juvenile. As in other sea-eagle species pairs, one species has a tan head, while the other has a white one.
Madagascar Flufftail - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Madagascar Harrier-Hawk - It is endemic to Madagascar. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Madagascar Ibis - The Madagascar Ibis is endemic to the woodlands and forests of Madagascar. Its diet consists mainly of insects, spiders, frogs, reptiles, snails and invertebrates. The female usually lays three eggs in platform nest made from twigs and branches.
Madagascar Jacana - The Madagascar Jacana is a species of bird in the Jacanidae family. It is endemic to Madagascar.
Madagascar Kestrel - It can reach a size of 30 cm. The wings are 180 mm to 195 mm at the males and 188 mm to 203 mm at the females. The males can reach a weight between 112 and 118 grams. The weight of the females is up to 128 grams. The head and the nape of the males is rufous grey with dark streaks. A dark moustachial streak running from the basis of the bill backwards to sides of the throat. The upperparts and the wingcoverts are chestnut with black spots. The uppertail coverts are grey with blackish spots. The long flight feathers are blackish brown, the inner webs are covered with white and chestnut spots. The underparts are whitish. The short flight feathers are chestnut coloured and dark banded. The chest, belly and underwing coverts are covered with black spots. The tail is grey coloured. It has six to seven narrow black bars and a broad subterminal bar. All feathers have white tips. In addition there is a rufous phase. At this morph the head and nape are almost black. Body and underwing coverts a
Madagascar Little Grebe - The binomial name commemorates the Austrian ornithologist August von Pelzeln.
Madagascar Magpie-Robin - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Madagascar Marsh-Harrier - The Malagasy Harrier is a bird of prey belonging to the marsh harrier group of harriers. It inhabits Madagascar and the Comoro Islands in the Indian Ocean. It was formerly regarded as a subspecies of the Réunion Harrier but is increasingly treated as a separate species. It is also known as the Madagascar Harrier, Madagascar Marsh Harrier or Malagasy Marsh Harrier.
Madagascar Nightjar - The Madagascar Nightjar is a species of nightjar in the Caprimulgidae family. It is found in Comoros, Madagascar, Mayotte, and Seychelles. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Madagascar Partridge - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Madagascar Pochard - Based on the accounts written by Webb and Delacour's in the 1920s and 1930s it seemed that the bird was still relatively common at Lake Alaotra .
Madagascar Pygmy-Kingfisher - The Madagascar Pygmy-kingfisher is a species of bird in the Alcedinidae family. It is endemic to Madagascar.
Madagascar Rail - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montanes, and freshwater marshes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Madagascar red owl - The Madagascar Red Owl resembles the cosmopolitan Barn Owl but is smaller and has orange plumage with small black spots. It is known to live in humid evergreen forest in the east of the island, being found in primary forest and in disturbed secondary forest . It feeds on native mammals like tenrecs and tuft-tailed rats . It nests in tree-cavities, although there is only one record of a nest being found.
Madagascar Scops-Owl - The Malagasy Scops-owl , also known as the Rainforest Scops-owl, is a species of owl in the Strigidae family. It is found in a large part of eastern Madagascar, but the exact distribution limits between it and the Torotoroka Scops-owl , with which it was long considered conspecific, require further study. The natural habitat of the Malagasy Scops-owl is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Madagascar Serpent Eagle - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Madagascar Snipe - This is a large and heavy snipe 29-32 cm long with a stocky body and relatively short legs for a wader. Its upperparts, head and neck are streaked and patterned with bold dark brown stripes and gold edges to the feathers forming lines down its back. The belly is white, with some brown barring on the flanks but never on the belly. The blackish bill is very long, straight and fairly robust. The legs and feet are yellowish-olive to greenish-grey. The sexes are similar, and immature differ only in showing buff fringes on the wing coverts.
Madagascar Sparrowhawk - It is endemic to Madagascar. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, dry savanna, and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Madagascar Starling - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Madagascar Swamp Warbler - The Madagascar Swamp-warbler is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found only in Madagascar. Its natural habitat is swamps.
Madagascar Teal - This duck is 40 to 45 cm in length, and is predominately warm brown all over with conspicuous black scalloping, heaviest on flanks and breast. It has a black speculum, and its bill is pinkish gray and slightly upturned.
Madagascar Wagtail - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland and rivers.
Madagascar White-eye - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Madagascar Wood Rail - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Madarasz's Tiger-Parrot - The Madarasz's Tiger Parrot is a species of parrot in the Psittacidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Magellanic Diving-Petrel - This 20cm bird is the easiest of its family to identify at sea. Like other diving petrels, it is a compact bird, mainly black above and white below, and similar in shape and size to a Little Auk, the resemblances with that unrelated seabird being due to convergence evolution, since both dive for fish.
Magellanic Oystercatcher - The Magellanic Oystercatcher is a species of wader in the Haematopodidae family. It is found in Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands. Its natural habitats are freshwater lakes and sandy shores.
Magellanic Penguin - Magellanic Penguins are medium-sized penguins which grow to be 61-76 cm tall and weigh between 2.7 kg and 6.5 kg , with the males being larger than the females and weight dropping while each parent nurtures its young.
Magellanic Plover - This species is in its structure and habits much like a turnstone, but it cannot be confused with any other wader species. Its upperparts and breast are pale grey, and the rest of the underparts are white. It has short red legs, a black bill and red eyes. In young birds, the eyes and legs are yellowish in colour, and the plumage is grey overall with scaling. The call is a dovelike coo.
Magellanic Tapaculo - It is a wren-like bird, 10 to 12 cm in length. The bill is slender and black while the legs are pinkish and fairly long. The tail is short and held erect. The plumage is dark-grey with a chestnut tinge to the flanks, undertail and wings. Some birds have a silvery-white patch on the crown. Juvenile birds are brown with dark barring and usually lack white on the crown. The song is loud, staccato and repetitive.
Magellanic Woodpecker - The Magellanic Woodpecker is 36-38 cm in length. Males of this species weigh 312-363g, and females weigh 276-312g.
Magenta-throated Woodstar - The 9 cm long, 3.5 g weight male Magenta-throated Woodstar is unmistakable with its magenta throat separated by a white collar from the green chest and flanks. The back is green and the belly is rufous. There are white rump patches, and the black-tipped tail is long and forked.
Magnificent Bird-of-paradise - The Magnificent Bird-of-paradise is distributed amongst the hill and mid-mountain forests of New Guinea and surrounding islands. Its diet consists mainly of fruits. Like most members of the Paradisaeidae family, the male is polygamous and performs an elaborate courtship display.
Magnificent Hummingbird - This bird inhabits the edges and clearings of montane oak forests from about 2000 m to the timberline. It is 13 cm long. The male weighs 10 g and the female 8.5 g. The black bill is long and slightly curved. Both sexes look very dark unless the sun catches the iridescence of the plumage and the brilliant colors flash in the sunlight.
Magnificent Riflebird - The Magnificent Riflebird is widely distributed throughout lowland rainforests of New Guinea and far Northeastern Australia. The diet consists mainly of fruits and arthropods.
Magnolia Warbler - The Magnolia Warbler, Dendroica magnolia , is a New World warbler. It breeds across most of Canada as well as New England and the Great Lakes region of the US.
Magpie Munia - It is found in subtropical/ tropical moist shrubland, forest and dry grassland habitat. The status of the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
Magpie Starling - The Magpie Starling is about 16-19 cm in length. The white patches at base of primaries are obvious in flight. The male is a shiny blue-black on upperparts, head and upper breast, with mostly white below and bloodred eyes. The female is a dull blackish above with dark grey crown, and a dark grey throat is separated from white belly by a glossy black breast band. Her eyes are red or orange-red. The Juvenile is brown with a white belly; eyes brown, becoming orange-red in as the bird matures. Exceptional young birds are entirely white below, including chin and throat.
Magpie Tanager - It is widespread in humid tropical and subtropical woodland, plantations, second growth, and parks in South America east of the Andes. It is absent from drier regions and most of north-eastern Brazil. In densely forested regions, it mainly occurs in relatively open sections . In such regions it is spreading with deforestation, which opens up the habitat. It is largely restricted to lowlands, but occurs up to an altitude of 2000 m on the east Andean slopes. It is common throughout most of its range, but rarer in the Guianas.
Magpie-lark - It is a common and very widespread bird both in urban and rural areas, occupying all parts of the continent except for Tasmania and some of the inland desert in the far north-west of Western Australia, and appears to have adapted well to the presence of humans.
Major Mitchell's Cockatoo - The Major Mitchell's Cockatoo, Lophochroa leadbeateri, also known as Leadbeater's Cockatoo or Pink Cockatoo, is a medium-sized cockatoo restricted to arid and semi-arid inland areas of Australia. It is placed in its own monotypic genus Lophochroa.
Makira thrush - The Makira Thrush or San Cristobal Thrush is a species of bird in the Turdidae family. It is endemic to the Solomon Islands.
Malabar Grey-Hornbill - The Malabar Grey Hornbill, Ocyceros griseus, is a hornbill that is endemic to the Western Ghats and associated hills of southern India. They have a large beak but lack the casque that is prominent in other species of hornbills. They are found mainly in dense forest and around rubber, arecanut or coffee plantations. They move around in small groups, feeding on figs and other forest fruits. Their loud cackling and laughing call makes them familiar to people living in the region.
Malabar Lark - This is a common bird of open country, cultivation and scrub, often at some altitude. It nests on the ground, laying two to three eggs. Its food is seeds and insects, the latter especially in the breeding season.
Malabar Parakeet - They breed in the dry season after the northeast Monsoon and the chicks fledge before the southwest Monsoon in June. They nest in holes in trees, especially old woodpecker and barbet nests. The birds begin breeding in December and eggs are laid in December and January. The usual clutch was 4 eggs which hatch after about 23 days. The female initially broods with the male bringing food and later the male takes over. The chicks fledge in about a month and leave the nest. Chicks are sometimes trapped for trade.
Malabar Pied-Hornbill - The Malabar Pied Hornbill is a common resident breeder in tropical southern Asia from India and Sri Lanka east to Borneo. Its habitat is open woodland and cultivation, often close to habitation.
Malabar Trogon - The Malabar Trogon is a species of bird in the trogon family. It is found in the forests of Sri Lanka and peninsular India. In India it is mainly found in the Western Ghats, hill forests of central India and in parts of the Eastern Ghats. They are insectivorous and although they are not migratory, they may make seasonal movements in the hill regions.
Malachite Kingfisher - This is a small kingfisher, 13 cm in length. The general colour of the upper parts of the adult bird is bright metallic blue. The head has a short crest of black and blue feathers, which gives rise to the scientific name. The face, cheeks and underparts are rufous and there are white patches on the throat and rear neck sides.
Malachite Sunbird - This large sunbird is found in hilly fynbos, protea and aloe habitat and cool montane and coastal scrub, up to 2,800 m altitude in South Africa. It also occurs in parks and gardens. It is resident, but may move downhill in winter. Frequently found nesting in suburban gardens of the Highveld.
Malaconotus multicolor - The Many-coloured Bushshrike is a species of bird in the bushshrike family, Malaconotidae.
Malaconotus zeylonus - It is a species of open habitats, including karoo scrub, fynbos and parks and gardens in urban areas. The bulky cup nest is constructed in a hedge, scrub or tree fork. The 2-6, usually three, red-brown or lilac-blotched greenish-blue eggs are incubated by both sexes for about 16 days to hatching, with another 18 days to fledging.
Malagasy Kingfisher - It is closely related to the Malachite Kingfisher which is widely distributed in mainland Africa.
Malagasy Pond Heron - The Malagasy Pond Heron , also known as the Madagascar Pond Heron, is a species of heron in the Ardeidae family. It is found in Angola, Bahamas, Burundi, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mayotte, Mozambique, Rwanda, Réunion, Seychelles, Somalia, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, rivers, freshwater lakes, freshwater marshes, estuarine waters, and arable land.
Malagasy Spinetail - The Malagasy Spinetail is a species of swift in the Apodidae family. It is found in Comoros, Madagascar, and Mayotte.
Malaita Honeyeater - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Malaita Rufous Fantail - The Malaita Fantail is a fantail endemic to Malaita in the Solomon Islands.
Malaita White-eye - The Malaita White-eye is a species of bird in the Zosteropidae family. It is endemic to the Solomon Islands.
Malay Honeyguide - The Malaysian Honeyguide occurs throughout lowland broadleaved forests of western Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, Borneo and the island of Sumatra. It nests in tree hollows.
Malayan Night Heron - The Malayan Night Heron stands about 47cm tall. It is nocturnal and is found in forests. Adults have black crowns, reddish-brown faces and necks, dark reddish-brown underparts with fine streaks, and black wings. The juvenile is greyish-brown with black and white spots, and its underparts are streaked.
Malayan Peacock-Pheasant - The Malayan Peacock-pheasant also known as Crested Peacock-pheasant or Malaysian Peacock-pheasant, is a medium-sized pheasant of the galliform family Phasianidae. The closely related Bornean Peacock-pheasant was formerly included here as a subspecies, but as understood today, P. malacense is monotypic.
Malaysian Eared Nightjar - The Malaysian Eared-nightjar is a species of nightjar in the Caprimulgidae family. It is found in Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Malaysian Niltava - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Malaysian Plover - The Malaysian Plover is 15 cm in length. The male can be recognized by a thin black band around the neck; the female has a thin brown band. Its legs are pale. Its voice is a soft twit.
Malaysian Rail-babbler - Opinions on the correct taxonomic placement for the rail-babbler have differed. At one time, it was placed in the Old World babbler family, Timaliidae. Until recently, it had been regarded as being related to a group which included the quail-thrushes and whipbirds, and placed in the family Cinclosomatidae .
Maleo megapode - The only member of the monotypic genus Macrocephalon, the Maleo is endemic to the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. It is found in the tropical lowland and hill forests, but nests in the open sandy areas, volcanic soils or beaches that are heated by the sun or geothermal energy for incubation.
Mali Firefinch - It is found in Mali & Senegal. The status of the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
Mallee Emu-wren - Its natural habitat is temperate grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mallee Fowl - Malleefowl are shy, wary, solitary birds that usually fly only to escape danger or reach a tree to roost in. Although very active, they are seldom seen as they freeze if disturbed, relying on their intricately patterned plumage to render them invisible, or else fade silently and rapidly into the undergrowth . They have many tactics to run away from predators.
Man-o-war-bird - It is widespread in the tropical Atlantic, breeding colonially in trees in Florida, the Caribbean and Cape Verde Islands. It also breeds along the Pacific coast of the Americas from Mexico to Ecuador including the Galapagos Islands.
Manchurian Bush-Warbler - The Manchurian Bush-warbler is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found in China, Hong Kong, India, North Korea, South Korea, Laos, the Philippines, Russia, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Mandarin Duck - The adult male is a striking and unmistakable bird. It has a red bill, large white crescent above the eye and reddish face and "whiskers". The breast is purple with two vertical white bars, and the flanks ruddy, with two orange "sails" at the back. The female is similar to female Wood Duck, with a white eye-ring and stripe running back from the eye, but is paler below, has a small white flank stripe, and a pale tip to its bill
Maned Duck - The flightless New Zealand species Chenonetta finschi which was formerly believed to constitute a monotypic genus has been determined to belong to Chenonetta . It became extinct before scientists could properly survey the New Zealand avifauna, but possibly as late as 1870 .
Maned Owl - It is found in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, and Liberia.
Mangrove Cuckoo - Adults have a long tail, brown above and black-and-white below, and a black curved bill with yellow on the lower mandible. The head and upper parts are brown. There is a yellow ring around the eye. This bird is best distinguished by its black facial mask and buffy underparts.
Mangrove Finch - As its name suggests, the Mangrove Finch lives in the mangroves of the Galápagos Islands. The mangrove finch feeds upon the various insects, larvae, spiders, and vegetable matter found in the mangroves. It closely resembles the far commoner Woodpecker Finch, but is not known to utilize tools.
Mangrove Gerygone - The species is princiapally distributed in mangrove forests and in forests and woodland adjacent to mangroves. The species will move into nearby forests from mangroves to feed, particularly in the breeding season. Where its range overlaps with that of the Large-billed Gerygone in the Kimberley it is actually displaced from the mangroves and is instead found in scrubland dominated by paperbarks and acaia.
Mangrove Golden Whistler - The Mangrove Golder Whistler or Black-tailed Whistler is an endemic to Australian bird found in mangrove forests and adjacent wet forests.
Mangrove Grey Fantail - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.
Mangrove Honeyeater - It is endemic to Australia, where it is restricted to the eastern coast from Townsville in Queensland to northern New South Wales. The species has been expanding its range southward in recent years. The mangrove honeyeater is generally locally common over most of its range, but is rarer in the south.
Mangrove Pitta - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mangrove Robin - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.
Mangrove Swallow - There is a swallow in coastal Peru that resembles the Mangrove Swallow, but lacks the white head stripe. It is possibly a subspecies, but the geographical separation suggests that this little known form is a distinct species.
Mangrove Vireo - The Mangrove Vireo is a species of bird in the Vireonidae family. It is found in Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and Nicaragua. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Mangrove Whistler - The Mangrove Whistler is a species of bird in the Pachycephalidae family. It is found in Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Manipur Bush Quail - It was collected and described by Allan Octavian Hume on an ornithological expedition to Manipur in 1881.
Manorina melanotis - Black-eared Miners are listed as endangered on the Australian Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Their conservation status also varies from state to state within Australia. For example:
Mantanani Scops-Owl - Various subspecies have been described, including the nominate from the Mantanani Islands, and O. m. sibutuensis from the Sulu islands. It has sometimes been considered a race of the Eurasian Scops-owl or the Oriental Scops-owl.
Manu Antbird - The Manu Antbird is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Manucodia ater - In appearance, the Glossy-mantled Manucode resembles and is difficult to distinguished from its nearest relatives, the Crinkle-collared and Jobi Manucodes. It is widely distributed throughout the lowlands of New Guinea and nearby islands. The diet consists mainly of fruits, figs and arthropods.
Manucodia chalybatus - This species resembles the Jobi Manucode in appearance, distinguished by its bronzed yellow-green neck feathers. The Crinkle-collared Manucode is found throughout lowlands and hill forests in mainland New Guinea and Misool Island of West Papua. The diet consists mainly of fruits and figs.
Manus Fantail - The Manus Fantail Rhipidura semirubra is a fantail endemic to the Admiralty Islands of Papua New Guinea.
Manus Masked-Owl - It is a poorly-known forest-dwelling species, which is rarely seen. Comparison with the closely related Australian Masked Owl indicates it is likely to have large territories, and the population may be smaller than 1000.
Manus Monarch - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Manx shearwater - The Manx Shearwater is a medium-sized shearwater in the seabird family Procellariidae. The scientific name of this species records a name shift: Manx Shearwaters were called Manks Puffins in the 17th Century. Puffin is an Anglo-Norman word for the cured carcasses of nestling shearwaters. The Atlantic Puffin acquired the name much later, possibly because of its similar nesting habits.
Many-banded Aracari - It is found in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Many-colored Rush Tyrant - It is a small dumpy bird, 10.5 cm in length. The tail is short, the wings are short and rounded and the bill is slender. As the bird's name suggests, the plumage is very colourful. The back and rump are green while the underparts are yellow apart from the white throat, black breastband and red undertail-coverts. The face is dark blue-grey, there is a yellow stripe over the eye and the crown is dark with a red patch that is often concealed. The wings and tail are dark with a white wingbar and white outer tail-feathers. Juveniles are considerably duller than the adults.
Many-coloured Fruit Dove - It is a small dove, 23 cm in length. The male is mostly pale yellow-white with a red crown and red bar across the back. The female is mostly green, darker on the back and greyer on the head and breast. Her crown is red while the undertail-coverts are red in Samoan birds and yellow in birds from Fiji and Tonga.
Many-spotted Hummingbird - It is found in lower Andean foothils from Ecuador, through Peru and Bolivia, to north-western Argentina. Previously also listed for Brazil, but this now considered mistaken, it not being included on the official list by CBRO.
Many-striped Canastero - It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.
Mao - It is a large honeyeater, 28-31 cm long. The plumage is dark, varying from blackish on the head and breast to greenish. There is a greenish mark under the eye. The bill is long, curved and black and the legs and feet are also black.
Marabou Stork - A massive bird, large specimens are thought to reach a height of 150 cm , a weight of over 9 kg and have a wingspan of at least 3.5 m . In the last regard, it shares the distinction of having the largest wingspan of any landbird with the Andean Condor. More typically, these birds measure 120–140 cm , 310–350 cm across the wings, and weigh 6–10.5 kg . Unlike most storks, the three Leptoptilos species fly with the neck retracted like a heron.
Marail Guan - The Marail Guan is a species of bird in the Cracidae family. It is found in Brazil, French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Maranon Thrush - The Marañón Thrush is a species of bird in the Turdidae family. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Maranon Tit-Tyrant - The Black-crested Tit-tyrant or Marañón Tit-Tyrant is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.
Marble-faced Bristle-Tyrant - The Marble-faced Bristle-tyrant is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Marbled Duck - This duck formerly bred in large numbers in the Mediterranean region, but is now restricted to a few sites in southern Spain and northwest Africa. In the east it survives in Iran , as well as isolated pockets in Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Iraq and further to the east in western India and western China. Its breeding habitat is lowland, shallow fresh waters. In some areas birds disperse from the breeding grounds, and have been encountered in the winter period in the Sahel zone, south of the Sahara.
Marbled Frogmouth - The Marbled Frogmouth is a species of bird in the Podargidae family. It is found in Australia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and Solomon Islands. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes Podargus ocellatus inexpectatus, a subspecies endemic to four islands in the Solomon Islands, was split into its own genus, Rigidipenna, in 2007.
Marbled Godwit - Adults have long blue-grey hairy legs and a very long pink bill with a slight upward curve and dark at the tip. The long neck, breast and belly are pale brown with dark bars on the breast and flanks. The back is mottled and dark. They show cinnamon wing linings in flight.
Marbled Honeyeater - The Marbled Honeyeater is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Marbled murrelet - The Marbled Murrelet is a small , chunky auk with a slender black bill. It has pointed wings and plumage that varies by season. The non-breeding plumage is typically white underneath with a black crown, nape, wings and back. The bird closely resembles its closest relative, the Long-billed Murrelet. In fact, these species were considered conspecific up until 1998. They are virtually identical. In breeding plumage, both have a brown mottled body and face. The Long-billed has a pale white throat, lacking in the Marbled. In winter plumage, the Marbled Murrelet has a white neck collar, absent in Long-billed. The Marbled Murrelet is shorter billed and slightly smaller than the Long-billed Murrelet.
Marbled Wood Quail - It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Marcapata Spinetail - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Margarita gnatcatcher - The male is dusky gray overall, distinguished only by its black crown and thin black beak. It has a long, thin black tail with narrow white tips and edges on the underside of the tail feathers. However, the male loses its plumage colors by winter, and obtains a plumage color like the females. The female is similar to the male, but with a blue-gray instead of a black crown.
Mariana Crow - The Mariana Crow is a small black crow with a bluish-black gloss on its tail, and a greenish-black gloss on its back, underparts, head, and wings. In general, females are smaller than males. An adult weighs about 9 ounces and is about 15 inches long.
Marianas fruit-dove - The female lays a single white egg. The chick and egg are tended to by both parents. Its diet consists mainly of fruits.
Mariqua Sunbird - The Mariqua Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Marmora's Warbler - These are small, long tailed, large-headed birds, overall very similar to their close relatives in thr Dartford Warbler group. Marmora's Warblers are grey above and below, lacking the brick-red underparts of the Dartford Warbler. Adult males have darker patches on the forehead and between the eye and the pointed bill. The legs and iris are red. The song is a fast rattle. Immature birds can be confused with young Dartford Warblers, which are also grey below, but Marmora's have a paler throat. Their iris is dark.
Maroon Oriole - The Maroon Oriole is a species of bird in the Oriolidae family. It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Pakistan, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Maroon Woodpecker - The Maroon Woodpecker is a species of bird in the Picidae family. It is found in Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, and Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Maroon-backed Accentor - Its natural habitat is temperate forests.
Maroon-bellied Parakeet - The Maroon-bellied Parakeet is a small parrot found from southeastern Brazil to north-eastern Argentina, including eastern Paraguay and Uruguay. It is also known as the Reddish-bellied Parakeet, and in aviculture it is usually referred to as the Maroon-bellied Conure, Reddish-bellied Conure or Brown-eared Conure.
Maroon-breasted Crowned Pigeon - There are two subspecies of the Southern Crowned Pigeon, differentiated by their shoulder and belly colorations. Goura scheepmakeri sclateri of southwest New Guinea with maroon shoulders and blue-grey belly, and the nominate race Goura scheepmakeri scheepmakeri of southeast New Guinea with blue-grey shoulders and maroon below. It also looks very similar to its relatives, the Victoria Crowned Pigeon, and the Western Crowned Pigeon.
Maroon-chested Ground-Dove - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Maroon-chinned Fruit-Dove - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Maroon-fronted Parrot - The species is endemic to northeast Mexico, where only about 2500–3000 birds survive in the wild.
Maroon-tailed Parakeet - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is not considered a threatened species by the IUCN.
Marquesan Ground-Dove - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist shrubland.
Marquesan Imperial-Pigeon - Formerly classified by the IUCN as a critically endangered species with an estimated population of less than 150 adult birds.
Marquesan Kingfisher - The Marquesan Kingfisher is a species of bird in the Alcedinidae family. It is endemic to French Polynesia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and plantations. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Marquesan Reed-Warbler - The Marquesan Reed-warbler is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found only in French Polynesia.
Marsh owl - This species is a part of the larger grouping of owls known as typical owls, Strigidae, which contains most species of owl. The other grouping is the barn owls, Tytonidae.
Marsh sandpiper - It resembles a small elegant Greenshank, with a long fine bill and very long yellowish legs. Like the Greenshank, it is greyish brown in breeding plumage, paler in winter, and has a white wedge up its back that is visible in flight. However, it is more closely related to the Common Redshank and the Wood Sandpiper . Together, they form a group of smallish shanks which tend to have red or reddish legs, and in breeding plumage are generally a subdued, light brown above with some darker mottling, with a pattern of somewhat diffuse small brownish spots on the breast and neck.
Marsh Seedeater - It is found in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay. It is migratory, breeding in wet grasslands and marshes around Uruguay and Argentina and migrating northwards in the austral winter to wet and dry grasslands in southern Brazil.
Marsh Spotted Babbler - The Marsh Babbler, Pellorneum palustre, is an Old World babbler. The Old World babblers are a large family of passerine birds characterised by soft fluffy plumage. These are birds of tropical areas, with the greatest variety in southeast Asia. Marsh Babbler is endemic to the Brahmaputra floodplain, its associated tributaries and adjacent hill ranges in Assam, Arunachal Pradesh and Meghalaya in India and eastern Bangladesh.
Marsh tern - It breeds in warmer parts of the world in southern Europe , temperate and eastern Asia, both coasts of North America, eastern South America and Australia. This bird has a number of geographical races, differing mainly in size and minor plumage details.
Marsh Warbler - The Marsh Warbler breeds in a variety of mostly damp habitats, but in Africa winters mainly in dry, well-vegetated areas. It is common over much of its breeding range and expanding its distribution in some areas. However in Britain it is now virtually extinct as a breeding bird. This insectivorous warbler can be easily confused with several close relatives, but the imitative song of the male bird is highly distinctive.
Marsh Widowbird - The Marsh Widowbird is a species of bird in the Ploceidae family. It is found in Angola, Cameroon, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.
Marsh Wren - The Marsh Wren is a small North American songbird of the wren family. It is sometimes called Long-billed Marsh Wren to distinguish it from the Sedge Wren, also known as Short-billed Marsh Wren.
Martial Eagle - It is a very large eagle, with a length of 76–96 cm , weight of 3.1–6.2 kg and a wingspan of 188–260 cm . The adult's plumage has dark brown upperparts, head and upper chest. The body underparts are white spotted with black. The underwing coverts are brown, with pale flight feathers, also streaked with black. The female is usually larger and more spotted than the male. The immature is paler above and has white underparts. It reaches adult plumage in its seventh year.
Martinique Oriole - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and plantations .
Marvantsetra Warbler - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Marvelous Spatuletail - A Peruvian endemic, this species is found in the forest edge of the Río Utcubamba region. It was first reported in 1835 by the bird collector Andrew Matthews for George Loddiges. The Marvellous Spatuletail is unique among birds, for it has just four feathers in its tail. Its most remarkable feature is the male's two long racquet-shaped outer tail feathers that cross each other and end in large violet-blue discs or "spatules". He can move them independently.
Masafuera Rayadito - Masafuera Rayaditos travel in pairs while feeding on arthropods; feeding occurs in the wood understory and occasionally on the ground in the leaf-litter. Nesting occurs at high altitudes , in small natural crevices in rocks.
Mascarene Grey White-eye - The taxon mauritianus, by most authorities considered a subspecies of the Mascarene White-eye, has occasionally been considered a separate monotypic species, the Mauritius Grey White-eye , in which case the common name of the remaining species often is modified to Réunion Grey White-eye. There is some uncertainty about the number of subspecies on Réunion, with most authorities only accepting a single, the nominate , while some also accept Z. b. alopekion, and Z. b. xerophilus. When only a single Réunion subspecies is accepted, alopekion and xerophilus are considered to represent morphs of the nominate.
Mascarene Paradise Flycatcher - It is found in Mauritius and Réunion. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Mascarene Parrot - The Mascarene Parrot is an extinct species of parrot known from bones, specimens and descriptions to have occurred in the Mascarene island of Réunion, and possibly Mauritius. The bird was first described by Dubois in 1674. During the latter half of the 18th century, a number of birds were exported alive to France and kept in captivity; the species was described after these examples came to the attention of the taxonomists of that time, like Brisson, Linnaeus and Buffon. Three stuffed specimens were preserved at that time. Today, two remain, accompanied by a number of bones found later. One, the sole remaining of the three extant around 1800, is in the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle in Paris, the other, dated 1806 and of unknown provenance, in the Naturhistorisches Museum in Vienna.
Mashona Hyliota - The Southern Hyliota is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found in Angola, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and dry savanna.
Masked Apalis - The Masked Apalis is a species of bird in the Cisticolidae family. It is found in Angola, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Tanzania, and Uganda. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Masked Finch - It is 12.5-13.5 cm long. The male is larger but the sexes are otherwise similar. It is cinnamon-brown above and paler below with a white rump, black mark on the flanks and black face mask. It has a heavy yellow bill and a pointed black tail. The eastern subspecies P. p. leucotis has whitish cheeks.
Masked Finfoot - The Masked Finfoot is an underwater specialist, with a long neck, and a striking sharp beak and lobed feet which are green. The male and female both have a black mask and eyebrow that contrasts with a white eyering and lateral cervical stripe. The rest of the neck is grey, the breast is pale and the back, wings and tail are rich brown. The males have an all black chin while the females have a white chin.
Masked Fruiteater - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Masked Gnatcatcher - Its jizz is similar to that of other gnatcatchers; a small bird with a relatively long thin bill, a long frequently cocked tail, and grey upperparts. The central rectrices are black, while the outer are white , and there is a white patch in the wing . Males of the southern and western group , the Masked Gnatcatchers in the strict sense, have grey underparts and a broad black mask. Females lack the mask, but instead have a black patch behind the eyes on the auriculars. The northern nominate subspecies dumicola is distinctive, with white underparts in both sexes, and a narrow black mask in the male. It may be a separate species, Berlepsch's Gnatcatcher.
Masked Lapwing - The Masked Lapwing , previously known as the Masked Plover and often called the Spur-winged Plover in its native range, is a large, common and conspicuous bird native to Australia, particularly the northern and eastern parts of the continent. It spends most of its time on the ground searching for food such as insects and worms and has several distinctive calls.
Masked Lark - The Masked Lark is a species of lark in the Alaudidae family. It is found in Ethiopia and Kenya. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry shrubland and subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland.
Masked Laughingthrush - The Masked Laughingthrush, Garrulax perspicillatus, is a species of laughingthrush found in Asia.
Masked Mountain Tanager - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland, and subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Masked Shining Parrot - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, subtropical or tropical moist montanes, arable land, and rural gardens. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Masked Shrike - Since this is a short-range migrant, a bird in Scotland in October 2004 was a remarkable example of vagrancy, though a second British record occurred on St. Mary's in the Isles of Scilly in November 2006.
Masked Tanager - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Masked Trogon - There are eight recognized subspecies of Masked Trogon:
Masked Water Tyrant - The Masked Water-tyrant is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family, the tyrant flycatchers. It is found in its major range in eastern and southeastern Brazil in the caatinga and extreme eastern cerrado, and also Atlantic coastal regions; a second smaller disjunct range occurs on the Pacific side of South America in western Ecuador, and coastal border regions of northwest Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, and heavily degraded former forest.
Masked Yellowthroat - The breeding habitat is marshes and other wet areas with dense low vegetation. The Masked Yellowthroat may also be found in other areas with dense shrub, but is less common in drier habitats. Two white eggs with reddish-brown markings are laid in a lined cup nest low in grass or rank vegetation.
Matinan Niltava - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mato Grosso Antbird - The Mato Grosso Antbird is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, and Paraguay. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Matsudaira's Storm Petrel - It breeds solely in the Volcano Islands in the north-west Pacific Ocean, and winters in the Indian Ocean. Its status is insufficiently known.
Maui parrotbill - The Maui parrotbill is one of the larger Hawaiian honeycreepers, measuring 14 centimetres
Mauritanian Heron - It is a large bird, standing 90-100 cm tall, with a 175-195 cm wingspan and a weight of 1-2 kg. Its plumage is largely grey above, and off-white below. Adults have a white head with a broad black supercilium and slender crest, while immatures have a dull grey head. It has a powerful, pinkish-yellow bill, which is brighter in breeding adults. It has a slow flight, with its long neck retracted . This is characteristic of herons and bitterns, and distinguishes them from storks, cranes and spoonbills, which extend their necks. The call is a loud croaking "fraaank". The Australian White-faced Heron is often incorrectly called Grey Heron.
Mauritian duck - The bird became extinct on both islands almost simultaneously and for the same reason: overhunting. On Mauritus, the "grey teals" were found in "great numbers" in 1681, but in 1693, Leguat found "wild ducks" to be already rare. In 1696, governor Deodati mentioned the species for the last time to be extant. On Réunion, the species is last mentioned to occur "in quantity" in de la Merveille's 1709 listing of the island's wildlife, but as Feuilley had not listed waterfowl in his 1705 report, de la Merveille's record is obviously based on obsolete hearsay information. The last reliable Réunion record of the species appears to be the report of Père Bernardin in 1687; thus, the date of extinction can be assumed to be the late 1690s on Mauritius, and a few years earlier on Réunion.
Mauritian shelduck - The Mauritian Shelduck is an extinct species of goose from Mauritius. It was a close relative of the Egyptian Goose. Known from one or two subfossil carpometacarpus bones and a few descriptions, this bird was about the size of a Brent Goose. Its appearance is unknown, except that its wings showed the typical color pattern of shelducks. It is sometimes considered conspecific with the Malagasy Shelduck; in this case it would become the nominate subspecies, as Alopochen mauritianus mauritianus.
Mauritius black bulbul - The Mauritius Bulbul , also known as Mauritius Black Bulbul, is a songbird endemic to Mauritius. Formerly, it was included in H. borbonicus as subspecies olivaceus.
Mauritius Cuckoo-shrike - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mauritius kestrel - It can reach a size between 26 and 30.5 cm. The weight is up to 250 grams. The males are slightly smaller than the females. The wing is approximately 45 cm and are rounded, unlike those of other falcons.
Maximillian's jay - This species occurs in western North America from central Oregon to northern Baja California and east as far as western Oklahoma though it wanders further afield out of the breeding season. It lives in foothills where the pinyon pines Pinus edulis and Pinus monophylla occur.
Maxwell's Black Weaver - The Maxwell's Black Weaver is a species of bird in the Ploceidae family. It is found in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda.
Mayotte Drongo - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, and plantations . It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mayotte scops owl - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Mayotte Sunbird - The Mayotte Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is endemic to Mayotte and surrounding islets in the southeastern Comoros. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Mayotte White-eye - The subspecies semiflava formerly occurred on Marianne and perhaps other islands in the Seychelles but is now extinct. It may be better classified as a separate species.
Mayr's Forest-Rail - The Mayr's Forest-rail is a species of bird in the Rallidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea.
Mayr's Streaked Honeyeater - The Mayr's Honeyeater is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Mccown's longspur - These birds have a large cone-shaped bill, a streaked back, a rust-coloured shoulder and a white tail with a dark tip. In breeding plumage, the male has a white throat and underparts, a grey face and nape and a black crown. Other birds have pale underparts, a dark crown and may have some black on the breast.
Mcgregor's Cuckoo-shrike - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forestss. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Mckay's snowflake - The species breeds on two islands in the Bering Sea, St. Matthew and Hall islands, and winters on the western coast of the US.
Meadow Bunting - It is 15 to 16.5 cm long. The male is mostly rufous-brown with dark streaks on the back. The boldly-patterned head is brown with white eyebrow, moustachial stripe and throat and grey sides to the neck. The outer tail-feathers are white and the legs are pinkish-brown. Females are similar but are duller and paler with a less well-defined head pattern.
Meadow Pipit - This is a widespread and often abundant small pipit. It is an undistinguished looking species on the ground, mainly brown above and buff below, with darker streaking on most of its plumage. It has pale pink legs and a thin bill. The call is a weak tsi-tsi. The simple repetitive song is given in a short song flight.
Mealy Amazon - The Mealy Amazon occurs in tropical Central America and South America. It frequents humid to semi-humid forest and plantations. In regions dominated by open/dry habitats it is restricted to gallery forest or completely absent.
Mediterranean Gull - The Mediterranean Gull, Ichthyaetus melanocephalus, is a small gull which breeds almost entirely in Europe, mainly in the south east, especially around the Black Sea, and in central Turkey. There are colonies elsewhere in southern Europe, and this species has undergone a dramatic range expansion in recent decades. Birders often abbreviate its name to "Med Gull". As is the case with many gulls, it has traditionally been placed in the genus Larus.
Mees' Monarch - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Megalurulus mariei - This is a long-tailed, medium sized "warbler" with a distinctive bold white supercillium. The bird’s plumage is unstreaked, with olive-brown uppersides and creamy white undersides.
Megazosterops palauensis - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Meinhertzhagen's Snow Finch - The Afghan Snowfinch , also known as Theresa's Snowfinch, is a bird of the sparrow family and is an Afghan endemic found only in the Hindu Kush. The species was named by Richard Meinertzhagen after his cousin and companion, Theresa Clay, who was an expert on bird lice.
Melanerpes pulcher - It is endemic to Colombia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Meller's Duck - Meller's Duck is a species of the dabbling duck genus Anas. It is endemic to eastern Madagascar. Although a population was established on Mauritius in the mid-18th century, this is on the verge of extinction due to habitat loss and competition by feral domestic ducks. The species name of this species is after the botanist Charles James Meller, and its generic name is from the Ancient Greek for a duck.
Melodious Blackbird - The adult Melodious Blackbird is a medium-sized icterid with a rounded tail. The male is 25.5 cm long and weighs 108 g. The slightly smaller female is 23 cm long and weighs 95 g. The adult plumage is entirely black with a bluish gloss, and the bill legs and feet are also black. The iris is brown. Females are identically plumaged to the males, but young birds are brownish black and lack iridescence. There are no subspecies.
Melodious Lark - The species as a whole has, perhaps, a maximum range of 110,400 km2., but this is something of a tattered web; small, isolated communities are strewn primarily about parts of South Africa , with fewer still in Botswana and Zimbabwe, and have limited opportunites for social interaction with each other.
Melodious Warbler - This small passerine bird is a species found in open woodland with bushes. 3-5 eggs are laid in a nest in a tree or a bush.
Merida flowerpiercer - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.
Mesopicos elliotii - It is found in Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Nigeria, Rwanda, and Uganda.
Mesopicos griseocephalus - The Olive Woodpecker is a species of bird in the Picidae family. It is found in Angola, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Metallic Starling - The adult has brilliant red eyes, a long tail and green-glossed black plumage. Immatures are pale below with dark streaks. Such birds migrate during August where upon they make their return journey to New Guinea.
Metallic-green Tanager - It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Meves's Glossy-Starling - The Meves's Glossy-starling is a species of starling in the Sturnidae family. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Mew Gull - Adults are 40-46 cm long, obviously smaller than the Herring Gull, and slightly smaller than the Ring-billed Gull, also differing from this in its shorter, more tapered bill with a more greenish shade of yellow, as well as being unmarked during the breeding season. The body is grey above and white below. The legs are greenish-yellow. In winter, the head is streaked grey, and the bill often has a poorly-defined blackish band near the tip . They have black wingtips with large white "mirrors". Young birds have scaly black-brown upperparts and a neat wing pattern, and grey legs. They take two to three years to reach maturity. The call is a high-pitched "laughing" cry.
Mexican Chickadee - The Mexican Chickadee is a small songbird, a passerine bird in the tit family Paridae. It is still often placed in the genus Parus with most other tits, but mtDNA cytochrome b sequence data and morphology suggest that separating Poecile more adequately expresses these birds' relationships . The American Ornithologists' Union had been treating Poecile as distinct genus for some time already.
Mexican dipper - This species, like other dippers, is equipped with an extra eyelid called a "nictitating membrane" that allows it to see underwater, and scales that close its nostrils when submerged. Dippers also produce more oil than most birds, which may help keep them warmer when seeking food underwater.
Mexican jacana - The jacanas are a group of wetland birds, which are identifiable by their huge feet and claws which enable them to walk on floating vegetation in the shallow lakes that are their preferred habitat. They are found worldwide within the tropical zone.
Mexican Jay - The Mexican Jay, Aphelocoma ultramarina, formerly known as the Gray-breasted Jay, is a New World jay native to the Sierra Madre Oriental, Sierra Madre Occidental, and Transvolcanic Belt of Mexico. It reaches north to eastern Arizona, western New Mexico and western Texas in the United States. Its preferred habitat is montane pine-oak forest.
Mexican Parrotlet - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Mexican Sheartail - The Mexican Sheartail is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found only in Mexico. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, rural gardens, and urban areas. It is threatened by habitat loss. D. eliza has been studied by Dr. Raul Ortiz-Pulido and colleagues en Mexico.
Mexican Trogon - Its natural habitat is subtropical and tropical moist montane forests. It prefers pine-evergreen and pine-oak woodland between 1,200 and 3,500 meters above sea level, occasionally lower,
Meyer's Friarbird - The Meyer's Friarbird is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Meyer's Goshawk - Meyer's Goshawk is a species of bird of prey in the Accipitridae family. It is found in Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and Solomon Islands. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Meyer's Parrot - The six subspecies are:
Micronesian Imperial-Pigeon - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Micronesian Kingfisher - The Micronesian Kingfisher has three subspecies, each restricted to a single island/island group:
Micronesian Myzomela - It is distributed throughout the Northern Mariana Islands, including Rota, Tinian and Saipan, as well as Yap, Chuuk, Pohnpei and Kosrae in Micronesia, and the islands of Palau. The species once also occurred in Guam, but that population is now almost certainly extinct.
Micronesian starling - Micronesian Starlings consume fruit, seeds, the occasional insect and the eggs of seabirds. They are bold around humans and will follow humans in seabird colonies to take the eggs of seabirds flushed by them.
Mid-mountain Berrypecker - The Mid-mountain Berrypecker or Lemon-breasted Berrypecker is a species of bird in the Melanocharitidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Middendorff's Grasshopper Warbler - The Middendorff's Grasshopper-Warbler is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found in Brunei, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines, Russia, Taiwan, and the United States.
Middle Spotted Woodpecker - The Middle Spotted Woodpecker is 20-22 cm long and has plumage similar to the Great Spotted Woodpecker. As with that species the upperparts are predominantly black with white oval wing patches and white barring on the wings, and the underparts are white. The main differences are a red crown, lack of a black moustachial stripe, a pink vent, and dark streaks on the flanks.
Mikado pheasant - The species occupies dense shrubs, bamboo growth and grassy terrain with conifer overstory in central and southern Taiwan, from 2000 to 3200 metres above sea level. Mikado Pheasants will often walk and forage for food at the same time, in a manner similar to chickens, on the forest floor and mountain trails, especially on rainy and foggy days. They will often come out into the open either in light rain or after heavy rain, where the fog often conceals them. These birds tend to be solitary, often quiet, yet alert. The pheasants can usually tolerate the presence of humans and as long as there is a distance of 10-20 metres, it is possible to observe them. When disturbed, they will often slowly and cautiously seek out shelter within surrounding shrubs, rather than trying to flutter away in a panic. If desperate, they can fly only short distances, diving down the mountainside. The males are territorial, with a range of 200-400 metres in radius. They make ke, ke, ke calls when fighting for their mate or territory.
Military Macaw - There are three subspecies, A. m. militaris, A. m. mexicana, and A. m. boliviana. The differences between the subspecies are slight and pertain to minor variations in color and size, generally 70–80 cm, with the militaris subspecies being the smallest and the mexicana being the largest.
Milky Stork - It can reach a length of 97 cm. The sexes look similar. The plumage is general white contrasted with a naked red face and a long shiny green-black tail and flight-feathers.
Millerbird - The Millerbird is a species of Old World warbler in the family Acrocephalidae. It had two subspecies, A. f. kingi and A f. familiaris. The latter, the Laysan Millerbird, became extinct sometime between 1916 and 1923. The former, the critically endangered Nihoa Millerbird, remains the only race left, inhabiting the small island Nihoa in Hawaiʻi. It is the only Old World warbler to have colonised Hawaiʻi, although there is no fossil evidence that the species ever had a distribution beyond these two islands.
Mimic Honeyeater - The Mimic Honeyeater is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Minahassa Owl - The Minahassa Masked Owl has short wings with wingspan of 240-250 mm well suited to its habitat in deep forests. It appears to prefer undisturbed or lightly disturbed rainforest at an altitude of 100-1,600 m. As the primary lowland forests on the Minahasa peninsula has been destroyed, the survival of the species depends on the more inaccessible montane forests. The species is known to inhabit the two large protected regions established in central Sulawesi and Minahassa Peninsula. The remaining population is estimated to be 2,500 – 10,000.
Minas Gerais Tyrannulet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mindanao Bleeding-heart - Its natural habitat is tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss and overhunting. It occurs on Samar, Leyte, Bohol, Dinagat, Mindanao and Basilan, but the only records since the 1980s are from Mindanao, Bohol and Samar. The Basilan subspecies, Gallicolumba crinigera bartletti, apparently became extinct by the mid-20th century,
Mindanao Hornbill - The Mindanao Tarictic Hornbill , sometimes shortened to Mindanao Hornbill, is a medium-small species of hornbill found in the canopy of rainforests on Mindanao, Dinagat, Siargao and Basilan in the southern Philippines. As is the case with all Philippine tarictic hornbills, it has been considered a subspecies of P. panini. Additionally, the Samar Tarictic Hornbill is often included as a subspecies of the Mindanao Tarictic Hornbill.
Mindanao Jungle-Flycatcher - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Mindanao Racquet-tailed Parrot - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Mindanao Scops Owl - The Mindanao Scops Owl is an owl endemic to Mindanao, Philippines.
Mindoro Flowerpecker - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mindoro Hornbill - The Mindoro Tarictic Hornbill , sometimes shortened to Mindoro Hornbill, is a species of hornbill in the Bucerotidae family. It is endemic to forests on Mindoro in the Philippines. As is the case with all Philippine tarictic hornbills, it has been considered a subspecies of P. panini. It is the only tarictic hornbill where both sexes are creamy-white and black. The sexes are very similar, and primarily differ in the colour of the ocular ring .
Mindoro Imperial-Pigeon - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mindoro Scops Owl - The Mindoro Scops Owl is an owl is endemic to Mindoro, Philippines. There are no sub-species.
Minute Hermit - The Minute Hermit is a tiny species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is endemic to humid Atlantic Forest in south-eastern Brazil, ranging from Rio de Janeiro north to south-eastern Bahia.
Miombo Double-collared Sunbird - The Miombo Double-collared Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Miombo Pied Barbet - The Miombo Barbet is a species of bird in the Ramphastidae family. It is found in Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Tanzania, and Zambia.
Miombo Rock Thrush - The Miombo Rock-thrush is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitat is dry savanna.
Mirafra affinis - M. affinis has arrowhead like spots pointing upwards on the breast. It is very similar to the Indian Bushlark but has buffy lores, less white behind ear coverts, darker centre to wing coverts and central tail feathers. Dark centres of primary coverts are prominent, and wing panels are duller and rufous. In southern Western Ghats race ceylonensis is darker and more rufous on the underside and a longer bill.
Mirafra erythrocephala - The Indochinese Bushlark is a species of lark in the Alaudidae family.
Mishana tyrannulet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mishmi Wren-Babbler - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forest. It is threatened by habitat loss. The species was first described based on a bird collected in 1947 but was not seen again until 2004, when a trip discovered it to be moderately common in a restricted area of Mishmi Hills in Arunachal Pradesh.
Mississippi kite - Mississippi Kites breed across the central and southern United States. Breeding territory has expanded in recent years and Mississippi Kites have been sighted in the southern New England states as far as Newmarket NH . They migrate to southern subtropical South America in the winter. Mississippi Kites usually lay two white eggs in twig nests that rest in a variety of deciduous trees. In the past 75 years, they have undergone changes in nesting habitat from use of forest and savanna to include shelterbelts and are now very common nesters in urban areas of all sizes in the western south-central states.
Mistle Thrush - The Mistle Thrush is a member of the thrush family Turdidae.
Mistletoebird - The Mistletoebird is small, 9–10 cm long and 7.5–11 g weight. The male is glossy blue-black above, with a red chest and a slight red undertail, and a black centre stripe running down its white belly. The female is dark grey above, with a white throat, light grey underparts, and just a touch of pinkish-red under the tail. The eyes, bill and legs are black; the bill is just over a centimetre long, slender, slightly downcurved and sharply pointed. Immature birds are similar to the female, but have an orange-pink bill instead of black.
Mitred Parakeet - A relatively long-tailed species with a total length of 34–38 cm .
Mocking Cliff-Chat - The Mocking Cliff-chat is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitat is dry savanna.
Moheli Brush-Warbler - The Moheli Brush-Warbler is a species of Old World warbler in the Sylviidae family. It is found only in Comoros. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Moheli scops-owl - This species is a part of the larger grouping of owls known as typical owls, Strigidae, which contains most species of owl. The other grouping is the barn owls, Tytonidae.
Moluccan Black-fronted White-eye - It is endemic to Indonesia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. Quite common, it is not considered a threatened species by the IUCN.
Moluccan Cuckooshrike - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Moluccan Flycatcher - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Moluccan Goshawk - The Moluccan Goshawk is a species of bird of prey in the Accipitridae family. It is endemic to Indonesia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Moluccan Hawk-Owl - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Moluccan King-Parrot - Described by Linnaeus in 1766,
Moluccan megapode - An Indonesian endemic, the Moluccan Megapode is confined to hill and mountain forests Maluku Islands of Halmahera, Buru, Seram, Ambon, Ternate, Haruku and Bacan. It also found in Misool Island of West Papua province.
Moluccan Owlet-Nightjar - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Moluccan Rufous-bellied Fruit Pigeon - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Moluccan Starling - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.
Mombasa Woodpecker - The Mombasa Woodpecker is a species of bird in the Picidae family. It is found in Kenya, Somalia, and Tanzania.
Mongolian Lark - The Mongolian Lark is a species of lark in the Alaudidae family. It is found in China, Mongolia, and Russia.
Mongolian Song Thrush - A recent molecular study places the Chinese Thrush's closest relatives as the similarly plumaged European species, the Song Thrush and the Mistle Thrush , all three species early offshoots from the main Turdus radiation around the world.
Monk parakeet - Psittacus monachus Boddaert, 1783 Bolborrhynchus luchsi Finsch, 1868 Myiopsitta luchsi but see text
Monotonous Lark - The range of M. Passerina is quite broad, extending over six countries in Africa; Angola, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. It's global Extent of Occurrence is estimated at 1,400,000 km2.
Montagu's Harrier - Sexual dimorphism is particularly apparent in the plumage of this species. Adult males are characterized by their overall pale grey plumage contrasting with black wingtips. Compared with other harriers this species has characteristic black bands along the secondaries, both above and below the wing and rusty streaks on belly and flanks. Adult females have a broadly similar plumage to that of Pallid and Hen Harriers. The underparts are mostly pale yellow-brown, the belly with longitudinal stripes and the wing coverts spotted. The upper parts are uniform dark brown except for the white upper tail coverts , and the sightly paler central wing coverts.
Montane Forest Screech-owl - The Montane Forest Screech-owl is a species of owl in the Strigidae family. It is found in Argentina and Bolivia. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Montane Francolin - The Moorland Francolin is a species of bird in the Phasianidae family. It is found in Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda.
Montane Oriole - The Black-tailed Oriole is a species of bird in the Oriolidae family. It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. Its natural habitats are boreal forests, subtropical or tropical dry forests, and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Montane Woodcreeper - It is found in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Monteiro's Bushshrike - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is probably threatened by habitat loss like other birds in its range, but its actual status remains unknown due to its elusiveness.
Monteiro's Hornbill - Females are smaller than males and can be recognized by turquoise facial skin. The eyes are black and the beak is red. Unlike other members of the family, which are omnivorous, the Monteiro's hornbill feeds exclusively on insects and other small arthropods. Its habitat is the savannah and dry thorn fields of NW Namibia.
Montezuma Oropendola - The Montezuma Oropendola, Psarocolius montezuma, is a New World tropical icterid bird. It is a resident breeder in the Caribbean coastal lowlands from southeastern Mexico to central Panama, but is absent from El Salvador and southern Guatemala. It also occurs on the Pacific slope of Nicaragua and Honduras and northwestern Costa Rica. It is among the oropendola species sometimes separated in the genus Gymnostinops. The English and scientific names of this species commemorate the Aztec emperor Moctezuma II.
Montezuma Quail - This species is found from Oaxaca north through the interior of Mexico to the mountains of central and southeastern Arizona, central and southwestern New Mexico, and west Texas. It is absent from deserts and the Río Balsas valley.
Monticola imerinus - Its natural habitats are dry savanna and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Montserrat Oriole - It inhabits a small area on the island of Montserrat in the Lesser Antilles of the West Indies, and is the national bird of this British territory. It is threatened by habitat loss, and has been classified by BirdLife International as Critically Endangered, with a current estimated population of between 200 and 800. Much of its habitat was destroyed by deforestation, Hurricane Hugo and the volcanic activity between 1995 and 1997.
Moorland Chat - The moorland chat is very bold, commonly approaching people, and even landing on or near them.
Morden's owlet - The Sokoke Scops Owl, Otus ireneae, is an owl found in Kenya and Tanzania. The greatest population of this species of owl is in the Cynometra-Manilkara forest, which is less than one-third of the Sokoke forest. It is also found in the Afzelia-Cynometra forest. The Sokoke Scops Owl can grow up to 16 to 18 cm and can weigh up to 50 grams and is the smallest scops owl of the Otus genus. It is insectivorous and can be either grey or rufous-brown.
Moreau's Sunbird - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Morningbird - The Morningbird is a songbird species in the family Colluricinclidae, which was formerly included in the Pachycephalidae. This species has sometimes been afforded its own genus, Malacolestes.
Mosque Swallow - This is a bird of open country with trees, and cultivated areas. It builds a closed mud nest with a tubular entrance in a cavity or under bridges and similar structures. It will use deserted buildings, tree holes or caves. Three or four eggs is a typical clutch.
Moss-backed Tanager - The Moss-backed Tanager is a species of bird in the Thraupidae family. It is found in Colombia and Ecuador. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Mossie - The Cape Sparrow is brightly coloured and distinctive, a medium-sized sparrow at 14 to 16 centimetres .
Mottle-backed Elaenia - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist shrubland and heavily degraded former forest.
Mottle-breasted Honeyeater - The Mottle-breasted Honeyeater is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Mottled duck - There are two distinct populations of Mottled Ducks. One population, A. fulvigula maculosa , lives on the Gulf of Mexico coast between Alabama and Tamaulipas ; outside the breeding season individual birds may venture as far south as to Veracruz. The other, A. fulvigula fulvigula , is resident in central and south Florida and occasionally strays north to Georgia. The same disjunct distribution pattern was also historically found in the local Sandhill Cranes.
Mottled Munia - The Mottled Munia Lonchura hunsteini is a species of estrildid finch breeding in Papua New Guinea. This species is also introduced to Federated States of Micronesia. It has an estimated global extent of occurrence of 20,000 to 50,000 km². It is found in subtropical/ tropical dry grassland habitat. The status of the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
Mottled Owl - The Mottled Owl Ciccaba virgata is a medium sized owl found from Mexico to Brazil and Argentina. The body has vertical bars on the chest and throat and white markings in the back. The eyes are dark and the head is round and they do not have ear tufts. It is thirteen to fifteen inches in length. They are territorial and found in dry forests and jungles up to 7500 feet above sea level.
Mottled Piculet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Mottled Spinetail - The Mottled Spinetail is a species of swift in the Apodidae family. It is found in Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Mottled Swift - The Mottled Swift is a species of swift in the Apodidae family. It is monotypic within the genus Tachymarptis. It is found in Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Mottled Wood Owl - The Mottled Wood Owl Strix ocellata is a species of medium sized owl found in South Asia. They are found in gardens and thin deciduous forests adjacent to dry thorn forests or agro environments. They are easily detected by their distinctive eerie laughing call of Chu hua-aa during the dusk and dawn, with a quaver in the second note. Usually found in pairs while roosting.
Mount Apo Sunbird - Its natural habitat is tropical moist montane forest. The species is not yet threatened by habitat loss, and is common within its range, but it is listed as Near Threatened due to its tiny range.
Mount Cameroon Speirops - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mount Duida Grass Finch - The Duida Grass-finch is a species of bird in the Emberizidae family. It is endemic to Venezuela.
Mountain Avocetbill - It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Mountain Barbet - The Mountain Barbet is a species of bird in the Ramphastidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Malaysia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Mountain Black-eye - It is found in Indonesia and Malaysia.
Mountain Bluebird - The Mountain Bluebird is migratory. Their range varies from Mexico in the winter to as far north as Alaska, throughout the western US.
Mountain Boubou - It is found in Burundi, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Nigeria, Rwanda, and Uganda.
Mountain Cacique - The Mountain Cacique is a species of bird in the Icteridae family.
Mountain Caracara - The Mountain Caracara is a species of bird of prey in the Falconidae family. It is found in puna and páramo in the Andes, ranging from southern Ecuador, through Peru and Bolivia, to northern Argentina and Chile. It is generally uncommon to fairly common. A highly opportunistic bird commonly seen walking on the ground, it will feed on both carrion and virtually any small animal it can catch. It resembles the closely related Carunculated Caracara and White-throated Caracara, but unlike those species its chest is uniform black. Juveniles are far less distinctive than the red-faced pied adults, being overall brown with dull pinkish-grey facial skin.
Mountain Eared-Nightjar - Archbold's Nightjar , also known as the Mountain Eared-nightjar, is a species of nightjar in the Caprimulgidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is named after American explorer Richard Archbold.
Mountain Elaenia - This tyrant flycatcher is 14-15 cm long and weighs 17-20 g. The upperparts are dull olive, with a narrow white eye ring. The wings are dusky with narrow yellow feather edges and two off-white wing bars. The throat and breast are yellowish grey, becoming dull yellow on the belly. Sexes are similar, but young birds are browner above, paler below, and have brighter wing bars.
Mountain Fantail - The Brown Fantail is a species of bird in the Rhipiduridae family. It is found in Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands.
Mountain Firetail - It is commonly found in subtropical/ tropical dry forest. The status of the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
Mountain Fulvetta - The Black-browed Fulvetta, Alcippe grotei, is sometimes considered to be conspecific with Mountain Fulvetta, but the two forms differ in morphology and vocalisations, and are separated altitudinally. Black-browed Fulvetta occurs primarily below 400 m, and Mountain Fulvetta above 900 m.
Mountain Greenbul - The Mountain Greenbul is a species of songbird in the Pycnonotidae family. It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The Green-throated Greenbul is included herein as a subspecies but might be a distinct species.
Mountain Hawk-Eagle - The Mountain Hawk-eagle or Hodgson's Hawk-eagle is a bird of prey. Like all eagles, it is in the family Accipitridae. It breeds in southern Asia from Pakistan, India and Sri Lanka to China, Taiwan and Japan.
Mountain Illadopsis - The Mountain Illadopsis is a species of bird in the Timaliidae family. It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Mountain Kingfisher - The Mountain Kingfisher is a species of bird in the Alcedinidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Mountain Leaf Warbler - It is found in Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Mountain Long-tailed Cuckoo - The Barred Long-tailed Cuckoo is a species of cuckoo in the Cuculidae family. It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Mountain Masked Apalis - The Black-faced Apalis is a species of bird in the Cisticolidae family. It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, and Uganda. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Mountain Mouse Warbler - The Mountain Mouse-warbler is a species of bird in the Pardalotidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Mountain Owlet-Nightjar - The Mountain Owlet-nightjar is a species of bird in the Aegothelidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Mountain Parakeet - The Mountain Parakeet is a species of parrot in the Psittacidae family. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.
Mountain Peltops Flycatcher - The Mountain Peltops is a species of bird in the Cracticidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Mountain plover - The Mountain Plover is 8 to 9.5 inches long and weighs about 3.7 ounces . In appearance it is typical of Charadrius plovers, except that unlike most, it has no band across the breast. The upperparts are sandy brown and the underparts and face are whitish. There are black feathers on the forecrown and a black stripe from each eye to the bill ; otherwise the plumage is plain. The Mountain Plover is much quieter than its more familiar relative the Killdeer. Its calls are variable, often low-pitched trilled or gurgling whistles. In courtship it makes a sound much like a far-off cow mooing.
Mountain Quail - This species is the only one in the genus Oreortyx, which is sometimes included in Callipepla. This is not appropriate, however, as the Mountain Quail's ancestors have diverged from other New World quails earlier than the bobwhites, no later than 6 mya.
Mountain Red-headed Honeyeater - The Mountain Myzomela is a species of bird in the Meliphagidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Mountain Robin - This is a bird of tall mountain forests and adjacent more open areas and woodland edge. Its preference is for oak with many epiphytes and mosses, normally from 1800 m altitude to the timberline. It descends in flocks as low as 900 m in the wet season.
Mountain Robin-Chat - It is found in Cameroon and Nigeria. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Mountain Saw-wing - It is found in Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, and Nigeria.
Mountain Serin - It is found in Indonesia and the Philippines. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.
Mountain Serpent-Eagle - Spilornis kinabaluensis is threatened by habitat loss. However, they occur within the Kinabalu National Park and the Mulu National Park. Their high-altitude habitats are usually too remote for logging and agriculture, making some of its range secure.
Mountain Streaked Bulbul - The Mountain Bulbul is a songbird species in the bulbul family . It is often placed in Hypsipetes, but seems to be closer to the type species of the genus Ixos, the Sunda Bulbul or Green-winged Bulbul .
Mountain Sunbird - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Mountain Tailor Bird - It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Mountain Thornbill - Its natural habitat is tropical rainforest on the Atherton tableland in north-east Queensland.
Mountain Warbler - The Mountain Flycatcher-warbler is a species of Acrocephalidae warblers; formerly, these were placed in the paraphyletic "Old World warblers". It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes and subtropical or tropical moist shrubland.
Mountain Wheatear - This non-migratory wheatear is resident in mountainous and rocky habitats in Namibia, Botswana, South Africa and southernmost Angola.
Mountain Whistler - The Hooded Whistler is a species of bird in the Pachycephalidae family. It is found in Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Mountain White-eye - It is found in Indonesia and the Philippines.
Mourning Collared Dove - This species is common or abundant near water. It builds a stick nest in a tree, often a mangrove, and lays two white eggs. Its flight is quick, with the regular beats and an occasional sharp flick of the wings which are characteristic of pigeons in general.
Mourning Dove - The Mourning Dove is a member of the dove family . The bird is also called the Western Turtle Dove or the American Mourning Dove or Rain Dove, and formerly was known as the Carolina Pigeon or Carolina Turtledove. It is one of the most abundant and widespread of all North American birds. It is also the leading gamebird, with up to 70 million birds shot annually in the US.
Mourning Warbler - The Mourning Warbler, Oporornis philadelphia, is a small songbird of the New World warbler family.
Mourning Wheatear - The Mourning Wheatear was first described by Lichenstein in 1823. It is an elegant and strikingly beautiful bird found in semi-desert areas in North Africa and the Middle East. It is sexually dimorphic with the females sporting more subtle plumage.
Mouse-colored Penduline Tit - This species has an extensive range in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda, with an estimated global Extent of Occurrence of 550,000 km2.
Mouse-coloured Antshrike - It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Mouse-coloured Sunbird - The Mouse-coloured Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is found in Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Somalia, South Africa, Swaziland, and Tanzania.
Mouse-coloured Tapaculo - Maurício found that the otherwise relatively well known S. speluncae actually consisted of two species, of which the southern was described as a new species, S. pachecoi, while the northern retained S. speluncae. It was further suggested that S. speluncae included yet another undescribed species, but more work was needed on that matter.
Mouse-coloured Thistletail - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.
Mouse-coloured Tyrannulet - Some recent authorities have suggested it should be split into two species: The widespread Mouse-colored Tyrannulet and the Tumbes Tyrannulet in western Ecuador and north-western Peru. The two are visually very similar, but vocally distinct.
Moussier's Redstart - The 13cm male Moussier's Redstart has a black head with a broad white stripe running above each eye and down the side of the neck. The upperparts are black other than a white wing patch, and the rich chestnut tail, from which it and other redstarts get their names . The underparts are a rich orange-red.
Moustached Antpitta - It is found in Colombia and Ecuador. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Moustached Antwren - The Moustached Antwren is a species of small Neotropical bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It has two allopatric subspecies, both sometimes considered separate monotypic species: The Griscom's Antwren ignota) is found the Chocó of north-western Ecuador, western Colombia and eastern Panama, and the Short-billed Antwren obscura) is found in the Amazon of north-eastern Peru, eastern Ecuador, south-eastern Colombia and north-western Brazil. The former has sometimes been considered conspecific with the Pygmy Antwren, but based on voices it has been recommended treating ignota and obscura as a subspecies of a single species. Both are found in the sub-canopy of humid lowland forests.
Moustached Brush Finch - The Moustached Brush-finch is a species of bird in the Emberizidae family. It is found in Colombia and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes and heavily degraded former forest.
Moustached Flower-piercer - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes, subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland, and heavily degraded former forest.
Moustached Grass Warbler - The Moustached Grass-Warbler is a species of African Warbler, formerly placed in the Sylviidae family. It is found in Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitats are moist savanna and subtropical or tropical moist shrubland.
Moustached Hawk-Cuckoo - The Moustached Hawk-cuckoo is a species of cuckoo in the Cuculidae family. It is found in Brunei, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, and Thailand. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Moustached Kingfisher - The Moustached Kingfisher is a species of bird in the Alcedinidae family. It is found in Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Moustached Laughingthrush - It is found in China, India, and Myanmar. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Moustached Parakeet - Feral populations of this species have now established themselves in cities like Mumbai and small numbers occur in other cities such as Chennai and Bangalore in India.
Moustached Puffbird - It is found in Colombia and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and heavily degraded former forest.
Moustached Tinkerbird - The Moustached Green-tinkerbird is a species of bird in the Ramphastidae family. It is found in Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.
Moustached Treeswift - The Moustached Treeswift is a species of bird in the Hemiprocnidae family. It is found in Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and Solomon Islands. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Moustached Turka - It is a stocky bird, 23-24 cm long, with a heavy bill and strong legs and feet. The tail is often held cocked. The plumage is mostly brown with white barring on the breast, belly and undertail-coverts. The bird has a dark eyestripe, white eyebrow and a broad white moustachial stripe. The bill and legs are black. The northern race atacamae is smaller and paler with less obvious barring on the underparts.
Moustached Warbler - It is scarce north of its range, but has occurred as a very rare vagrant as far as Poland and Denmark. There are a few reports from Great Britain, including a pair breeding in Cambridgeshire in 1946, but these records have recently been removed from the official list of British birds.
Moustached Woodcreeper - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Moustached Wren - It is 15.5 cm long. It is reddish-brown above with buff flanks and a greyish crown and nape. The sides of the head are streaked black and white and it has a black moustache.
Mrs Gould's Sunbird - It is found in Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Hong Kong, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitats are temperate forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Mugimaki Flycatcher - It is 13 to 13.5 centimetres long. It has a rattling call and often flicks its wings and tail. The adult male has blackish upperparts with a short white supercilium behind the eye, a white wing-patch, white edges to the tertials and white at the base of the outer tail-feathers. The breast and throat are orange-red while the belly and undertail-coverts are white. The female is grey-brown above with a pale orange-brown breast and throat. She lacks white in the tail, has one or two pale wingbars rather than a white wing-patch and has a supercilium that is either faint or absent entirely. Young males are similar to the female but have a brighter orange breast, white in the tail and a more obvious supercilium.
Mulga Parrot - The Mulga Parrot , also known as the Many-coloured Parrot, is endemic in arid scrublands and lightly timbered grasslands in the interior of southern Australia.
Multicoloured Tanager - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Murphy's Petrel - Very little is known about this species of Petrel. It occurs in the South Pacific, nesting on rocky islets and cliffs off tropical oceanic islands in the Austral, Tuamotu, and Pitcairn island groups. The bird has been recorded off the coast of the Hawaiian Islands and well off the Pacific Coast of the United States.
Muscovy Duck - The Muscovy Duck is a large duck which is native to Mexico and Central and South America. A small wild population reaches into the United States in the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. There also are feral breeding populations in North America in and around public parks in nearly every state of the USA and in the Canadian provinces; feral populations also exist in Europe. Although the Muscovy Duck is a tropical bird, it adapts to icy and snowy conditions down to –12°C and below without ill effects.
Musk Duck - They are moderately common through the Murray-Darling and Cooper Creek basins, and in the wetter, fertile areas in the south of the continent: the south-west corner of Western Australia, Victoria, and Tasmania. Musk Ducks avoid the far north, or the arid west and north-west.
Musk Lorikeet - The Musk Lorikeet is 22 cm long. It is mainly green and it is identified by its red forehead, blue crown and a distinctive yellow band on its wing. Both upper and lower mandibles of the beak are red at the tip and darker near its base. The blue area on the crown of the female is smaller and paler than seen on the male.
Mute Swan - The Mute Swan was first formally described by the German naturalist Johann Friedrich Gmelin as Anas olor in 1789, and was transferred by Johann Matthäus Bechstein to the new genus Cygnus in 1803. It is the type species of the genus Cygnus. The synonym Sthenelides olor has occasionally been used in the past.
Myophonus caeruleus - It is found in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkmenistan, and Vietnam. Its natural habitats are temperate forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Myophonus horsfieldii - The Malabar Whistling Thrush is a whistling thrush in the thrush family Turdidae. They are also known locally by the name of Whistling Schoolboy for the whistling calls that they make at dawn that have a very human quality. The species is a resident in the Western Ghats and associated hills of peninsular India including central India and parts of the Eastern Ghats.
Myophonus melanurus - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Myophonus robinsoni - The Malaysian Whistling-thrush is a species of bird in the Turdidae family. It is endemic to Malaysia.
Myrmotherula snowi - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Mysterious Starling - Overall length 7.5 inches . Bill from gape 1 inch , from anterior margin of nostril, 1.24 cm. Tarsus 2.74 cm, tail 6.4 cm, wing 10.5 cm, wingspan 32 cm. Wing and tarsus measurement are somewhat less than in the living bird due to shrinkage of the specimen. The other measurements are either from the freshly-killed bird or are unlikely to have changed. Dull dusky black overall, with lighter brown feather edges which are prominent on the body feathers and less conspicuous on the remiges and tail. Iris yellow. Feet dusky brownish; bill the same color or somewhat lighter. A fine painting of the species is found in Fuller .
Myzomela caledonica - It is around 11 cm in length and weighs between 6.5-8 g. The males are slightly heavier than the females. The plumage of this species also varies by sex, with the male having a scarlet head, breast and back, black wings and tail and a white belly and rump. The female has a dull brown head, breast and back with a slight red wash on the face, duller wings and belly. Juvenile birds resemble the female.
Myzomela chermesina - Its natural habitats are tropical moist lowland forests, secondary forest and coconut plantations. The species is tolerant of habitat loss but is listed as vulnerable due to its tiny range.
Myzomela wakoloensis - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.

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