Birds beginning with E

Eagle Owl - The Eagle Owl is a large and powerful bird, smaller than the Golden Eagle but larger than the Snowy Owl. It is sometimes titled the world's largest owl, but so is the Blakiston's Fish Owl, which is slightly bigger on average. The Eagle Owl has a wingspan of up to 138–200 cm and measures 58–73 cm long. Females weigh 1.75-4.2 kg and males weigh 1.5-3.2 kg . In comparison, the common Barn Owl weighs about 500 grams . It mainly feeds on small mammals, but can kill prey up to the size of foxes and young deer , if taken by surprise. Larger prey is consumed on the ground which leaves the bird vulnerable .
Eared Dove - It is a close relative of the North American Mourning Dove. With that species, the Socorro Dove, and possibly the Galápagos Dove it forms a superspecies. The latter two are insular offshoots, the Socorro birds from ancestral Mourning Doves, the Galápagos ones from more ancient stock.
Eared Poorwill - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Eared trogon - It is a resident of the middle to upper levels of pine-oak woodlands and oak-conifer forests, frequently along streams. It nests 5–9 m high in an unlined shallow tree cavity, usually selecting an old woodpecker hole. Nests have been observed in pine, fir, maple, and aspen trees. Limited excavation of the cavity is accomplished using the bill to dig into the rotten wood of the walls and opening.
East African Citril - La Palisse Hotel, Kigali, Rwanda
East Coast Akelat - This species is a forest-dwelling insectivorous bird related to the small Old World flycatchers commonly known as chats; like these, it was formerly placed with the thrushes .
Eastern Bluebird - Adults have a white belly. Adult males are bright blue on top and have a reddish brown throat and breast. Adult females have lighter blue wings and tail, a brownish throat and breast and a grey crown and back. Eastern Bluebirds are found east of the Rockies, southern Canada to the Gulf States and southeastern Arizona to Nicaragua.
Eastern Bristlebird - It is endemic to Australia. Its natural habitats are temperate forests, temperate shrubland, and temperate grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Eastern Chanting-Goshawk - It occurs in semidesert, dry bush, and wooded grassland below 2000 in southern Ethiopia, Djibouti, western Somalia, eastern Kenya, northeastern Tanzania, and adjacent Uganda.
Eastern Chat-Tanager - It is found on the island of Hispaniola where it is now restricted to central and southern parts of the Dominican Republic. It formerly also occurred on the Samaná Peninsula as well as on Gonâve Island in Haiti. In the south-west of Hispaniola it is replaced by the Western Chat-tanager which was formerly classified as a subspecies of the Eastern Chat-tanager.
Eastern Chiff-chaff - It is a migratory passerine which winters in southern and western Europe, southern Asia and north Africa. Greenish-brown above and off-white below, it is named onomatopoeically for its simple chiff-chaff song. It has a number of subspecies, some of which are now treated as full species. The female builds a domed nest on or near the ground, and assumes most of the responsibility for brooding and feeding the chicks, whilst the male has little involvement in nesting, but defends his territory against rivals, and attacks potential predators.
Eastern Crowned-Warbler - Sometimes an Eastern Crowned Wabler gets lost and can be found in Europe:
Eastern Curlew - The Far Eastern Curlew spends its breeding season in northeastern Asia, including Siberia to Kamchatka, and Mongolia. Its breeding habitat is composed of marshy and swampy wetlands and lakeshores. Most individuals winter in coastal Australia, with a few heading to South Korea, Thailand, and New Zealand, where they stay at estuaries, beaches, and salt marshes. During its migration the Far Eastern Curlew commonly passes the Yellow Sea.
Eastern Great Rosefinch - It is found in Bhutan, China, India, and Nepal. Its natural habitat is boreal shrubland.
Eastern Green Magpie - The Yellow-breasted Magpie is a passerine bird of crow family, Corvidae. It is native to China and south east Asia.
Eastern Grey Plantain-eater - This species is a resident breeder in open woodland habitats in tropical east Africa. It lays two or three eggs in a tree platform nest.
Eastern Kingbird - Adults are grey-black on the upperparts with light underparts; they have a long black tail with a white end and long pointed wings. They have a red patch on their crown, seldom seen. They are of average size for a kingbird, at 19-23 cm , 33-38 cm across the wings and weighing 33-55 g .
Eastern Marsh Harrier - It is 48 to 58 cm long with a wingspan of 113 to 137 cm; like most birds of prey, the female is usually larger than the male. The male's plumage is variable; typically the head, breast, back and wing-coverts are blackish with pale streaks. The rest of the wing is grey with black wingtips and a white front edge. The tail is grey, the rump is white and the underparts are mostly white. The female is dark brown with buff streaking on the head and underparts. The rump is often whitish and the tail has dark bars. Young birds are dark brown with buff on the head and a pale patch on the underwing.
Eastern Meadowlark - The Eastern Meadowlark, Sturnella magna, is a medium-sized icterid bird, very similar in appearance to the Western Meadowlark. It occurs from eastern North America to South America, where it is also most widespread in the east.
Eastern Mountain Owlet-Nightjar - The Archbold's Owlet-nightjar is a species of bird in the Aegothelidae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is named after American explorer Richard Archbold.
Eastern Paradise-Whydah - It is a brood parasite to the Green-winged Pytilia. Male Long-tailed Paradise Whydahs imitate the song of the male Green-winged Pytilia. The whydah chicks are larger and louder than the host chicks, so the foster parents will give them more attention instead their own chicks.
Eastern Parotia - Its appearance resembles Lawes's Parotia, of which it is sometimes considered a subspecies. It differs in the male frontal crest's and the female's dorsal plumages colors. The male has an iridescent golden green breast shield, elongated black plumes, three erectile spatule head wires behind each blue iris eye and golden brown nasal tuft feathers. The female is smaller than the male, with brown plumage and black barred below.
Eastern Phoebe - It is migratory, wintering in the southernmost USA and Central America. It is a very rare vagrant to western Europe. This is one of the first birds to return to the breeding grounds in spring and one of the last to leave in the fall. They arrive for breeding in mid-late March, but they return to winter quarters around the same time when other migrant songbirds do, in September and early October; migration times have stayed the same in the last 100 years.
Eastern Red-footed Falcon - The Amur Falcon , formerly Eastern Red-footed Falcon, is a small raptor of the falcon family. It breeds in south-eastern Siberia and Northern China, wintering in Southern Africa.
Eastern Riflebird - Its appearance resembles and sometimes considered as a subspecies of the Magnificent Riflebird, being different by the lower breast and abdomen coloration, male's distinctive growling song and feathered culmen base.
Eastern Rock Pigeon - This pigeon is comparatively restricted in range of Pakistan to the furthest northern inner valleys of the Karakoram, Hindu Kush and Pamirs. In Pakistan it occurs in northern Chitral particularly in the western part bordering Nuristan in Afghanistan, further east in valleys of Gilgit in Yasin and Hunza and Karakoram ranges in Baltistan from about 2000 meters in winter up to 5500 meters during summer months.
Eastern Rosella - The Eastern Rosella was named by George Shaw in 1792. It is sometimes considered a subspecies of the Pale-headed Rosella . The term White-cheeked Rosella has been used for a species or superspecies combining the Pale-headed and Eastern forms.
Eastern Screech-Owl - Adults range from 16 to 25 cm in length. They have either rusty or dark gray intricately patterned plumage with streaking on the underparts. Small and stocky, short-tailed and broad-winged, they have a large round head with ear tufts, yellow eyes and a yellowish bill. Rusty birds are more common in the southern parts of the range; pairings of the two color variants do occur. A pale gray variation also exists in western Canada and the north-central United States. The color variations are referred to as "red-phase" and "gray-phase" by bird watchers and ornithologists.
Eastern Spinebill - The Eastern Spinebill, Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris, is a species of honeyeater found in south-eastern Australia in forest and woodland areas, as well as gardens in urban areas of Sydney and Melbourne. It is around 15 cm long, and has a distinctive black, white and chestnut plumage, a red eye, and a long downcurved bill.
Eastern turkey - Adult Wild Turkeys have long reddish-yellow to greyish-green legs and a black body. Males have a large, featherless, reddish head and a red throat, and red wattles on the throat and neck. The head has fleshy growths called caruncles: when males are excited, a fleshy flap on the bill expands, and this, the wattles and the bare skin of the head and neck all become engorged with blood, almost concealing the eyes and bill. Each foot has three toes, and males have a spur behind each of their lower legs.
Eastern Warbling-Vireo - Its breeding habitat is open deciduous and mixed woods from Alaska to Mexico and the Florida Panhandle. It often nests along streams. It migrates to Mexico and Central America.
Eastern wattled cuckoo-shrike - The Eastern Wattled Cuckoo-shrike is a species of bird in the Campephagidae family. It is found in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, and Nigeria. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Eastern Whipbird - The Eastern Whipbird was mistakenly described by John Latham as two separate species in 1802 from early colonial illustrations, first as the White-cheeked Crow , then as the Coachwhip Flycatcher .
Eastern Wood-Pewee - Adults are grey-olive on the upperparts with light underparts, washed with olive on the breast. They have two wing bars, and the primary remiges are long, giving the wingtip a slim and very pointed appearance. The upper part of the bill is dark, the lower part is yellowish. The songs are basically a mournful whistled pee-a'wee given in a series, which gave this bird its name, and a "we-aww" with a rising note at the end.
Eastern Yellow Robin - The Eastern Yellow Robin was first described by ornithologist George Shaw in 1790. Two subspecies are recognised; the Northern Yellow Robin and the nominate or Eastern . The former previously regarded as a separate species.
Eastern Yellow-billed Hornbill - The Eastern Yellow-billed Hornbill is a species of hornbill in the Bucerotidae family. It is found in Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda. It resembles the Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill, but has blackish skin around the eyes.
Eaton's Pintail - This species was named after the English explorer and naturalist Alfred Edmund Eaton.
Ebony Myzomela - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Eclectus parrot - Ornithologists usually classify the Eclectus Parrot as a member of tribe Psittaculini in the Psittacidae family of order Psittaciformes. However, some recent thought indicates that there is a great deal of commonality between the Eclectus Parrot and the Loriinae tribe.
Ecuadorian Ground-Dove - The Ecuadorian Ground-dove is a species of bird in the Columbidae family. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.
Ecuadorian Hillstar - The Ecuadorian Hillstar is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found in grassland, scrub and stunted woodland at altitudes of 3,500 to 5,200 metres in the Andes of Ecuador and far southern Colombia. Uniquely among the hillstars, the males head is mainly bluish-purple.
Ecuadorian Piculet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests.
Ecuadorian Piedtail - The Ecuadorian Piedtail is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Ecuadorian Tyrannulet - The Ecuadorian Tyrannulet is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Edward's pheasant - This species has two varieties. The nominate form L. e. edwardsi has a white crest and upper tail, whereas the northern form L. e. hatinhensis is found with a variable number of white retrices. This difference in the two forms may be due to inbreeding of a restricted, fragmented population there, and has also been seen in captive, inbred L. e. edwardsi. The northern form is sometimes given a separate species status by some authors, Vietnamese Pheasant, Lophura hatinhensis .
Edwards's Fig-Parrot - Edwards's Fig Parrot was first described by French zoologist Émile Oustalet in 1885, and named in honour of French naturalist Alphonse Milne-Edwards. It is one of three species in the genus Psittaculirostris.
Egyptian Goose - The Egyptian Goose is a member of the duck, goose and swan family Anatidae. It is in the shelduck subfamily Tadorninae, and is the only extant member of the genus Alopochen. mtDNA cytochrome b sequence data suggest that the relationships of Alopochen to Tadorna need further investigation .
Egyptian Nightjar - Open desert with a few trees or bushes are the haunts of this crepuscular nightjar. It flies at dusk, most often at sundown, with an easy, silent moth-like flight; its strong and deliberate wingbeats alternate with sweeps and wheels with motionless wings.
Egyptian Plover - It is also sometimes referred to as the Crocodile Bird because it is famous for its symbiotic relationship with crocodiles . According to a story dating to Herodotus, the crocodiles lie on the shore with their mouths open, and the plovers fly into the crocodiles' mouths so as to feed on bits of decaying meat that are lodged between the crocodiles' teeth. The crocodiles do not eat the plovers, as the plovers are providing the crocodiles with greatly-needed dentistry. Two prominent ornithologists have supported this story anecdotally, but the behaviour has never been authenticated .
Egyptian Vulture - There are three recognised subspecies of the Egyptian Vulture:
El Oro Parakeet - The body is mostly covered by a darkish green color with a red forehead . The edges of the wings, and the end of the tail, also have this same red color. On the outer edges of the wings, there is a bluish color. Feet are dark grey, the eyes are surrounded by a white circle and the bill is horn colored. It is approximately 22cm long and weighs 73g.
El Oro Tapaculo - It is a small tapaculo, 11 centimetres long. The bill is black and fairly heavy. The plumage is grey with a brown nape and rump and brown barring on the flanks. The tail is blackish. The female's underparts are browner than those of the male. The song is a series of double-notes repeated for about a minute.
Elegant Crested-Tinamou - The Elegant Crested Tinamou or Martineta Tinamou, Eudromia elegans, is a medium-sized tinamou that can be found in southern Chile and Argentina
Elegant Euphonia - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Elegant Parrot - The Elegant Parrot was originally named by the renowned ornithologist and artist John Gould in 1837, its specific name Latin for "elegant". It is one of six species of grass parrot in the genus Neophema, and within it a member of the subgenus Neonanodes. Its common name is Elegant Parrot, but has also been called Elegant Parakeet, Elegant Grass Parakeet, and Grass Parrot in the past.
Elegant Pitta - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Elegant Scops-Owl - It is found on the Nansei Shoto islands, southern Japan, on Lanyu Island, off south-east Taiwan, and on the Batanes and Babuyan islands off northern Luzon, Philippines in semi-tropical evergreen forest. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Elegant Sunbird - An Indonesian endemic, the Elegant Sunbird is distributed to the island of Sangihe, north of Sulawesi. It is found and locally common in the forests and plantations near Mount Sahendaruman in southern Sangihe.
Elegant Tern - The Elegant Tern is a seabird of the tern family Sternidae. It breeds on the Pacific coasts of the southern USA and Mexico and winters south to Peru, Ecuador and Chile.
Eleonora's Falcon - This species breeds on islands in the Mediterranean particularly off Greece , but also in the Canary Islands, and off Spain, Italy, Croatia, Morocco and Algeria. Tilos Park is the breeding area for ten percent of the world population of Eleonora Falcons. Six hundred and fifty pairs of this species breed on this island according to research conducted by the Hellenic Ornithological Society and the European Union LIFE-Nature program of Tilos. It is rare as a vagrant north of its range.
Eleothreptus candicans - The White-winged Nightjar is a species of nightjar in the Caprimulgidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, and Paraguay. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Elepaio - The ʻelepaio is the first native bird to sing in the morning and the last to stop singing at night; apart from whistled and chattering contact and alarm calls, it is probably best known for its song, from which derives the common name: a pleasant and rather loud warble which sounds like e-le-PAI-o or ele-PAI-o. It nests between January and June.
Elf owl - Elf Owls usually choose abandoned, north-facing woodpecker cavities in Saguaro cacti, sycamores, cottonwoods and other hardwood trees, to raise their young. There the female lays three round white eggs. The eggs are incubated for about 3 weeks before the chicks hatch. The young owlets fledge at about 10 weeks. Usually, chicks are born in mid-June or early July. By the end of July, they are almost always fledged and ready to set out on their own.
Elfin-woods Warbler - Due to its small populations and restricted habitats, conservation efforts were begun in 1982 to protect this species but, as of 2005, the warbler was still in need of protection. The species is not in immediate danger as the majority of its habitat is protected forest, but introduced species, such as rats and Small Asian Mongooses, habitat reduction, and natural disasters represent potential threats to the population.
Elliot's Laughingthrush - It is found in China and India.
Elliot's pheasant - The Elliot's Pheasant is endemic to China, where it lives in evergreen and mountain forests of southeastern China, at altitudes up to 6,200 feet. The diet consists mainly of seeds, leaves and berries.
Elminia albiventris - It is found in Burundi, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Nigeria, Rwanda, and Uganda. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Elminia albonotata - The White-tailed Crested-flycatcher is a species of bird in the flycatcher family Stenostiridae. It has a discontinuous distribution in eastern Africa. There are three subspecies, E. a. albonotata of central Kenya, and Uganda through to south west Tanzania; E. a. subvaerulea, which ranges from southern Kenya to Malawi and E. a. swynnertoni of Zimbabwe and Mozambique.
Elminia nigromitrata - The Dusky Crested-flycatcher is a species of bird in the Stenostiridae family. It is found in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Elusive Antpitta - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Elwes' Crake - The Black-tailed Crake is a species of bird in the Rallidae family. It is found in Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam.
Emerald Dove - This is a common species in rainforest and similar dense wet woodlands, farms, gardens, mangroves and coastal heaths. It builds a scant stick nest in a tree up to five metres and lays two cream-coloured eggs. Breeding tends to occur in Australia spring or early summer in southeastern Australia and late in the dry season in northern Australia.
Emerald Tanager - The Emerald Tanager is a species of bird in the Thraupidae family. It is found in Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Panama. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Emerald Toucanet - Like other toucans, the Emerald Toucanet is brightly marked and has a large bill. The adult is 30–35 cm long and weighs approximately 180 g. The sexes are alike in appearance, although the female generally is smaller and slightly shorter-billed. It is, as other members of the genus Aulacorhynchus, mainly green. The vent and tail-tip are rufous. The bill is black with yellow to the upper mandible and, in all except the nominate and wagleri groups , a white band at the base of the bill. The members of the caeruleogularis group have a rufous patch near the base of the upper mandible, while some members of the albivitta group have a rufous patch near the base of the lower mandible. The throat is white in the nominate and the wagleri group, blue in the caeruleogularis and cognatus group, pale grey-blue in the lautus group, blue or black in the atrogularis group, and white or grey-blue in the albivitta group. The eye-ring ranges from blue to red, in some subspecies very dark, almost appearing blackish from a d
Emerald-bellied Puffleg - The Emerald-bellied Puffleg is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Emerald-chinned Hummingbird - The Emerald-chinned Hummingbird is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found in Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and Nicaragua. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montanes and heavily degraded former forest.
Emerald-spotted Wood Dove - This is a species of open drier deciduous woodland and second growth. It is absent from evergreen rainforests and semidesert areas.
Emin's Shrike - The Emin's Shrike is a species of bird in the Laniidae family. It is found in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Nigeria, Sudan, and Uganda. Its natural habitat is dry savanna.
Emperor Fairywren - The Broad-billed Fairywren is a species of bird in the Maluridae family. It is found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea.
Emperor Goose - The Emperor Goose is a species of goose. It breeds around the Bering Sea, mostly in Alaska, USA, but also in Kamchatka, Russia. It is migratory, wintering mainly in the Aleutian Islands.
Emperor of Germany Bird of Paradise - The Emperor Bird-of-paradise is endemic to Papua New Guinea. It is distributed in hill forests of the Huon Peninsula. The diet consists mainly of fruits, figs and arthropods.
Emperor Penguin - Its diet consists primarily of fish, but can also include crustaceans, such as krill, and cephalopods, such as squid. In hunting, the species can remain submerged up to 18 minutes, diving to a depth of 535 m . It has several adaptations to facilitate this, including an unusually structured hemoglobin to allow it to function at low oxygen levels, solid bones to reduce barotrauma, and the ability to reduce its metabolism and shut down non-essential organ functions.
Empress Brilliant - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is not considered a threatened species by the IUCN.
Emu - Dromiceius novaehollandiae
Enggano White-eye - The Enggano White-eye is a species of bird in the Zosteropidae family. It is endemic to Indonesia.
English sparrow - The House Sparrow is a species of passerine bird of the sparrow family Passeridae. It is also known by the alternative vernacular names English Sparrow, Indian Sparrow, and Spatzie or Spotsie. It occurs naturally in most of Europe, the Mediterranean region, and much of Asia. It has also been intentionally or accidentally introduced to many parts of the world, making it the most widely distributed wild bird. It is strongly associated with human habitations, but it is not the only sparrow species found near houses. It is a chunky little bird, with feathers mostly different shades of brown and grey.
Epaulet Oriole - The Epaulet Oriole is a species of bird in the Icteridae family. The Moriche Oriole, formerly considered a distinct species is now placed herein as a subspecies.
Epinecrophylla erythrura - The Rufous-tailed Antwren is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It was formerly placed in the genus Myrmotherula. It is found in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Epinecrophylla fjeldsaai - The Yasuni Antwren or Brown-backed Antwren is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It was formerly placed in the genus Myrmotherula. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Epinecrophylla spodionota - The Foothill Antwren is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It was formerly placed in the genus Myrmotherula. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Equatorial Akalat - The Equatorial Akalat is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, and Uganda. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Erckell’s Francolin - The Erckel's Francolin is a species of bird in the Phasianidae family. It is native to Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Sudan. In 1957 the species was also introduced to the Hawaiian islands.
Eremopterix griseus - It is a bird of open dry habitats including scrub, stony wastes and cultivation. It nests on the ground and lays two or three eggs. The food is insects and seeds.
Eremopterix signatus - The Chestnut-headed Sparrow-lark is a species of lark in the Alaudidae family. It is found in Ethiopia, Israel, Kenya, Somalia, and Sudan. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland, and hot deserts.
Eriocnemis isabellae - The Gorgeted Puffleg measures between 90 and 100 millimeters in length. The name of the species is in relation to the gorget on the throat of the male, a patch of iridescent green and brilliant blue feathers, and from the puffs of white feathers at the thighs.
Erythropygia coryphaeus - The Karoo Scrub-robin or Karoo Robin is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Lesotho, Namibia, and South Africa. Its natural habitats are dry shrubland and Mediterranean-type shrubby vegetation.
Erythropygia galactotes - The Rufous Bush Robin , also called the Rufous-tailed Scrub Robin or Rufous Bush Chat, is a small member of the flycatchers. It breeds around the Mediterranean and east to Pakistan. It also breeds south of the Sahara from the Sahel region east to Somalia; these birds are sometimes considered to be a separate species, African Scrub Robin . It is partially migratory, wintering in east Africa and India. This is a very rare visitor to northern Europe.
Erythropygia hartlaubi - The Brown-backed Scrub-robin is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Nigeria, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. Its natural habitat is moist savanna.
Erythropygia leucophrys - The Red-backed Scrub-robin is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Gabon, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and dry savanna.
Erythropygia leucosticta - The Forest Scrub-robin is a species of bird in the Muscicapidae family. It is found in Angola, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Uganda. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Erythrura gouldiae - The Gouldian Finch, Erythrura gouldiae , also known as the Lady Gouldian Finch, Gould's Finch or the Rainbow Finch, is a colorful passerine bird endemic to Australia. There is strong evidence of a continuing decline, even at the best-known site near Katherine in the Northern Territory. Large numbers are bred in captivity, particularly in Australia. In the state of South Australia, National Parks & Wildlife Department permit returns in the late 1990s showed that over 13,000 Gouldian Finches were being kept by aviculturists. If extrapolated to an Australia-wide figure this would result in a total of over 100,000 birds. In 1992, it was classified as "Endangered in the wild" under IUCN's criteria C2ai. This was due to the fact that the viable population size was estimated to be less than 2,500 mature individuals, no permanent subpopulation was known to contain more than 250 mature individuals, and that a continuing decline was observed in the number of mature individuals. It is currently subject to a conserva
Eskimo Curlew - The Eskimo Curlew is one of eight species of curlew, and is classed with them in the genus Numenius. It was formerly placed in the separate genus Mesoscolopax. Numenius is classed in the family Scolopacidae. Other species in that family include woodcocks, phalaropes, snipes, and sandpipers. Scolopacidae is a Charadriiform lineage. >:)
Esmeraldas Antbird - The Esmeraldas Antbird is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It is found in Colombia and Ecuador. The species has been the source of taxonomic confusion in the past, as the male was placed as a separate species . It is only recently that the male and female were realised to be the same species.
Esmeraldas Woodstar - The Esmeraldas Woodstar, Colibri De Berlepsch, ColibrÍ De Esmeraldas, or Estrellita EsmeraldeÑA is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found only in Ecuador.
Eudynamys orientalis - The Pacific Koel is found in forest, woodland, plantations and gardens from Wallacea east to the Solomon Island and south to northern and eastern Australia. The Pacific Koel has not been rated by IUCN, but the Australian Koel is considered to be of Least Concern.
Euler's Flycatcher - Euler's Flycatcher, Lathrotriccus euleri, is a small passerine bird in the tyrant flycatcher family. It breeds in South America east of the Andes from Colombia and Venezuela south to Bolivia and Argentina, and on the islands of Trinidad and formerly also Grenada . This species is named for the Swiss ornithologist Carl Euler.
Eumyias thalassinus - This species was earlier placed in the genus Muscicapa and it has been suggested that it is closer to the Niltava flycatchers.
Eungella Honeyeater - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Eurasian Bittern - Bitterns are thickset herons with bright, pale, buffy-brown plumage covered with dark streaks and bars, similar in appearance to the to the American Bittern, Botaurus lentiginosa. The Eurasian or Great Bittern is 69-81 cm in length, with a 100-130 cm wingspan, although their most distinctive feature is the males booming call in spring.
Eurasian Bullfinch - This bird breeds across Europe and temperate Asia. It is mainly resident, but many northern birds migrate further south in the winter.
Eurasian Capercaillie - Also spelt Capercailzie , this species' name is derived from the Gaelic capull coille, meaning "horse of the woods".
Eurasian Collared Dove - It is a medium sized dove, distinctly smaller than the Wood Pigeon, similar in length to a Rock Pigeon but slimmer and longer-tailed, and slightly larger than the related Turtle Dove, 30–33 cm long from tip of beak to tip of tail, with a wingspan of 47–55 cm, and a weight of 125–240 g. It is grey-buff to pinkish-grey overall, a little darker above than below, with a blue-grey underwing patch. The tail feathers are grey-buff above, and dark grey tipped white below; the outer tail feathers also tipped whitish above. It has a black half-collar edged with white on its nape from which it gets its name. The short legs are red and the bill is black. The iris is red, but from a distance the eyes appear to be black, as the pupil is relatively large and only a narrow rim of reddish-brown iris can be seen around the black pupil. The eye is surrounded by a small area of bare skin, which is either white or yellow. The two sexes are virtually indistinguishable; juveniles differ in having a poorly developed collar, and a br
Eurasian Curlew - The largest wader in its range, at 50-57 cm length, and a 1 m wingspan. It is mainly greyish brown, with a white back, and a very long curved bill. Males and females look identical, but the bill is longest in the adult female. It is generally not possible to recognize the sex of a single Eurasian Curlew, or even several ones as there is much variation; telling male and female of a mated pair apart is usually possible however.
Eurasian Dotterel - It breeds in the Arctic tundra of northern Eurasia from Norway to eastern Siberia, and on suitable mountain plateaus such as the Scottish highlands and the Alps. It nests in a bare ground scrape and lays two to four eggs.
Eurasian Golden Oriole - Golden Oriole inhabit tall deciduous trees in woodland, orchards or parks and spend much of their time in tree canopies. They feed on insects and fruit. They build neat nests in tree forks and lay 3-6 eggs.
Eurasian Golden-Plover - Breeding adults are spotted gold and black on the crown, back and wings. Their face and neck are black with a white border; they have a black breast and a dark rump. The legs are black. In winter, the black is lost and the plover then has a yellowish face and breast and white underparts.
Eurasian Hoopoe - The Hoopoe is classified in the Coraciiformes clade, a group that also includes kingfishers, bee-eaters, rollers, and woodhoopoes
Eurasian jackdaw - The Jackdaw was one of the many species originally described by Linnaeus in his 18th century work, Systema Naturae, and it still bears its original name of Corvus monedula.
Eurasian Jay - The Eurasian Jay is a species of bird occurring over a vast region from Western Europe and north-west Africa to the eastern seaboard of Asia and down into south-east Asia. Across its vast range, several very distinct racial forms have evolved to look very different from each other, especially when forms at the extremes of its range are compared.
Eurasian River Warbler - This small passerine bird is a species found in dense deciduous vegetation close to water in bogs or near a river. 5-7 eggs are laid in a nest in a tussock or on the ground. This species is a rare vagrant to western Europe. In Britain, a small number of males have set up territories in spring, including a bird in Greater Manchester in 1995.
Eurasian Scops Owl - It breeds in open woodland, parks and gardens. It lays 3-6 eggs in a tree hole. This is a small owl, and at 19-21 cm length and a 47-54 cm wingspan is not as large as the Little Owl. It takes small prey such as insects and other invertebrates. It is largely nocturnal.
Eurasian Sparrowhawk - The Eurasian Sparrowhawk is a small bird of prey in the family Accipitridae. Adult male Eurasian Sparrowhawks have bluish grey upperparts and orange-barred underparts; females and juveniles are brown above with brown barring below. The female is up to 25% larger than the male – one of the largest differences between the sexes in any bird species.
Eurasian Thick-knee - It is a medium-sized wader with a strong yellow and black beak, large yellow eyes , and cryptic plumage. The bird is striking in flight, with black and white wing markings.
Eurasian Treecreeper - The Eurasian Treecreeper or Common Treecreeper, Certhia familiaris, is a small passerine bird also known in the British Isles, where it is the only living member of its genus, simply as Treecreeper. It is similar to other treecreepers, and has a curved bill, patterned brown upperparts, whitish underparts, and long stiff tail feathers which help it creep up tree trunks. It can be most easily distinguished from the similar Short-toed Treecreeper, which shares much of its European range, by its different song.
European Bee Eater - This species, like other bee-eaters, is a richly-coloured, slender bird. It has brown and yellow upper parts, whilst the wings are green and the beak is black. It can reach a length of 27–29 cm , including the two elongated central tail feathers. Sexes are alike.
European Goldfinch - The goldfinch breeds across Europe, North Africa, and western and central Asia, in open, partially wooded lowlands. It is resident in the milder west of its range, but migrates from colder regions. It will also make local movements, even in the west, to escape bad weather. It has been introduced to many areas of the world .
European herring gull - The taxonomy of the Herring Gull / Lesser Black-backed Gull complex is very complicated, different authorities recognising between two and eight species.
European Pied Flycatcher - This is a 12-13.5 cm long bird. The breeding male is mainly black above and white below, with a large white wing patch, white tail sides and a small forehead patch. The Iberian subspecies iberiae has a larger forehead patch and a pale rump. Non-breeding males, females and juveniles have the black replaced by a pale brown, and may be very difficult to distinguish from other Ficedula flycatchers, particularly the Collared Flycatcher, with which this species hybridizes to a limited extent .
European Robin - The European Robin , most commonly known in Anglophone Europe simply as the Robin, is a small insectivorous passerine bird that was formerly classed as a member of the thrush family , but is now considered to be an Old World flycatcher . Around 12.5–14.0 cm in length, the male and female are similar in colouration, with an orange breast and face lined with grey, brown upperparts and a whitish belly. It is found across Europe, east to Western Siberia and south to North Africa; it is sedentary in most of its range except the far north.
European Serin - It is a small short-tailed bird, 11–12 cm in length. The upper parts are dark-streaked greyish green, with a yellow rump. The yellow breast and white belly are also heavily streaked. The male has a brighter yellow face and breast, yellow wing bars and yellow tail sides. The song of this bird is a buzzing trill, very familiar in Mediterranean countries.
European swallow - The Barn Swallow is the most widespread species of swallow in the world.
Eurylaimus samarensis - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Evening Grosbeak - The Evening Grosbeak is a large finch. In the past, it was treated in a genus of its own as Hesperiphona vespertina, but is now usually placed in the same genus as the Hawfinch of Eurasia.
Everett's Thrush - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Everett's White-eye - It is found in Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Everglade kite - Snail Kites are 45 cm long with a 120 cm wingspan. They have long, broad, and rounded wings. It is long-tailed, with a white rump and undertail coverts. The dark, deeply hooked beak is an adaptation to its diet.
Eversmann's Redstart - Eversmann's Redstart or Rufous-backed Redstart is a passerine bird belonging to the genus Phoenicurus, a genus of redstarts. It was formerly classified in the thrush family Turdidae but is now placed in the Old World flycatcher family Muscicapidae. It was described by the German biologist Eduard Friedrich Eversmann who is commemorated in the bird's English name.
Eye-ringed Flatbill - The Eye-ringed Flatbill is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Belize, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Panama. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes. The Pacific Flatbill is sometimes still considered a subspecies of R. brevirostris.
Eye-ringed Thistletail - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.
Eye-ringed Tody-Tyrant - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests. It is becoming rare due to habitat loss.
Eyebrowed thrush - It breeds in dense coniferous forest and taiga eastwards from Siberia. It is strongly migratory, wintering south to southeast Asia and Indonesia. It is a rare vagrant to western Europe.
Eyebrowed Wren-Babbler - The Eyebrowed Wren-babbler is a species of bird in the Timaliidae family. It is found in Bhutan, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montanes.

Animal of the Day
Animal of the day on Facebook