Birds beginning with J

Jabiru - The name Jabiru has also been used for two other birds of a distinct genus: the Asian Black-necked Stork , commonly called "Jabiru" in Australia; and sometimes also for the Saddle-billed Stork of sub-Saharan Africa. In particular, Gardiner's Egyptian hieroglyph G29, believed to depict an E. senegalensis, is sometimes labeled "Jabiru" in hieroglyph lists.
Jack Snipe - Their breeding habitat is marshes, bogs, tundra and wet meadows with short vegetation in northern Europe and northern Russia.
Jackal Buzzard - The Jackal Buzzard is a 55–60 cm long African bird of prey with three main subspecies.
Jackson's Hornbill - The Jackson's Hornbill is a species of hornbill in the Bucerotidae family. It is found in Kenya, Sudan, and Uganda. Except for the dense white spots to the wing-coverts, it resembles, and is often considered a subspecies of, Von der Decken's Hornbill.
Jackson’s Francolin - The Jackson's Francolin is a species of bird in the Phasianidae family. It is found in Kenya and Uganda.
Jacky Winter - Its natural habitats are temperate forests, subtropical or tropical dry forests, and Mediterranean-type shrubby vegetation.
Jacobin Cuckoo - The Jacobin Cuckoo, Pied Cuckoo, or Pied Crested Cuckoo, Clamator jacobinus, is a member of the cuckoo order of birds that is found in Africa and Asia. It is partially migratory and in India, it has been considered a harbinger of the Monsoon rains due to the timing of its arrival. It has been associated with a bird in Indian mythology and poetry, known as the Chatak and represented as a bird with a beak on its head that waits for rains to quench its thirst.
Jamaican Becard - The Jamaican Becard is a species of bird in the Tityridae family. Its genus, Pachyramphus, has traditionally been placed in Cotingidae or Tyrannidae, but evidence strongly suggest it is better placed in Tityridae. It is endemic to Jamaica. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Jamaican Blackbird - The Jamaican Blackbird is a small icterid with all black plumage. It has a short tail that is often frayed . It is strictly arboreal and has a wheezing call. Pairs occupy large territories in a variety of wet montane forest types, including elfin and mist forests, that have substantial epiphytes and mosses on the trees.
Jamaican Crow - As its name suggests, this species is found on the moderately sized island of Jamaica where it inhabits woodland mixed with cleared areas and can be frequently found in larger gardens also. Though primarily a bird of hill and mountain forest, it comes down to lower elevations during the dry season where it is more likely to be seen.
Jamaican Elaenia - The Jamaican Elaenia is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is endemic to Jamaica. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and heavily degraded former forest.
Jamaican Mango - The Jamaican Mango is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is an endemic species of Jamaica, meaning, it is found only on the island of Jamaica and nowhere else in the world. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Jamaican Oriole - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and heavily degraded former forest.
Jamaican Owl - The Jamaican Owl is a medium-sized tawny colored owl that is endemic to the island of Jamaica. It is considered by some the only member of its genus Pseudoscops, while other authorities include in it the Striped Owl. It has dark brown barring, flecking and streaks and its amber facial disk is rimmed in black-flecked white. It has hazel eyes, long ear tufts and a grayish-yellow bill. It mainly uses open habitats with scattered clumps of trees, generally in lowlands. It is nocturnal and eats mainly large insects, spiders, amphibians, lizards, birds and rodents. It lays its eggs in tree cavities. This species is common and widespread throughout its limited range, but some populations are at risk from habitat loss.
Jamaican Petrel - This species was last collected in 1879, and was searched for without success between 1996 and 2000. However, it cannot yet be classified as extinct because nocturnal petrels are notoriously difficult to record, and it may conceivably occur on Dominica and Guadeloupe.
Jamaican Pewee - The Jamaican Pewee is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is endemic to Jamaica. It was formerly regarded as a subspecies of the Greater Antillean Pewee .
Jamaican Poorwill - The Jamaican Pauraque, Jamaican Poorwill, or Jamaican Least-pauraqué is a species of nightjar in the Caprimulgidae family. It is endemic to Jamaica. Its natural habitats are tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland. It is critically endangered or possibly already extinct due to a combination of introduced predators and habitat destruction.
Jamaican Tody - Found only in Jamaica, the Jamaican Tody is a small and colourful bird, predominantly green above, with a red throat and yellow underparts, with some pink on the sides. It has a large head and a long, flat bill. It perches on small branches, with its bills unturned and, like its Cuban relative , takes insects, larvae, and fruit. The Jamaican Tody nests in burrows, which it excavates in muddy banks or rotten wood.
Jamaican Vireo - The Jamaican Vireo is a species of bird in the Vireonidae family. It is endemic to Jamaica. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, and heavily degraded former forest.
Jamaican Woodpecker - The Jamaican Woodpecker is a species of bird in the Picidae family. It is endemic to Jamaica. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forest.
Jambandu Indigobird - Different authorities assign this species to various families. Peters assigns it to Ploceidae whereas Sibley-Monroe assigns it to Passeridae while Gill places it in Estrildidae.
Jambu Fruit Dove - The Jambu Fruit-dove inhabits mangrove swamps and lowland rain forests up to 1,500 m and is also found in second growth woodland. The male holds a breeding territory, advertised by raising its wings, bobbing its body and cooing. It will defend its territory with a quick peck if the territorial display fails. The female builds a flimsy nest of twigs, roots and grasses, which are collected by her mate, in a tree and lays one or sometimes two white eggs which are incubated for about 20 days to hatching, with a further 12 or more days to fledging.
James' Flamingo - James’s flamingo is smaller than the Andean flamingo and is 3 feet tall on average. They have a very long neck that is made up of 19 long cervical vertebrae allowing for a lot of movement and rotation of the head .
Jameson's Antpecker - This bird inhabits tropical lowland moist forest in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea, Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire. When Jameson's and the Red-fronted antpeckers were still evaluated as one species, they were classified as a species of Least Concern by the IUCN
Jameson's Firefinch - It is found in Angola, Botswana, Chad, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The status of the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
Jameson's Wattle-eye - The Jameson's Wattle-eye is a species of bird in the Platysteiridae family. It is found in Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
Jandaya Parakeet - It was first described by German naturalist Johann Friedrich Gmelin in 1788.
Japanese Accentor - Its natural habitat is temperate forests.
Japanese Bush Warbler - Some other Japanese names are haru-dori , haru-tsuge-dori and hanami-dori ). Its place in Japanese poetry has given the name uta-yomi-dori and kyo-yomi-dori , this latter name because its call is traditionally transcribed in Japanese as "Hō-hoke-kyo", which is a phrase from the lotus sutra.
Japanese Cormorant - The Japanese Cormorant has a black body with a white throat and cheeks and a partially yellow bill.
Japanese crane - The Red-crowned Crane , also called the Japanese Crane or Manchurian Crane, is a large crane and is the second rarest crane in the world .
Japanese Night Heron - The Japanese Night Heron prefers dense, damp forest, in both its breeding and winter ranges. Common until the 1970s, this species is threatened by deforestation in its summer and winter ranges. Other documented threats include the introduction of the Siberian Weasel in its breeding range. The current population is estimated at less than 1,000 mature individuals.
Japanese Pale-legged Willow Warbler - Its natural habitat is temperate forests.
Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher - The Japanese Paradise-flycatcher is mainly migratory and breeds in shady mature deciduous or evergreen broadleaf forest of Japan , South Korea, Taiwan and the far north Philippines. It is a non-breeding visitor to mainland China, Hong Kong, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, and Sumatra, Indonesia.
Japanese quail - The Japanese quail is used mainly for table and egg production, and is a good dual purpose bird. Krishi Vigyan Kendra Kannur under Kerala Agricultural University has produced video album containing songs and visuals on Japanese Quail production under Creative Extension series.
Japanese Robin - The name "Japanese Robin" is also sometimes used for the Red-billed Leiothrix .
Japanese Skylark - The Japanese Skylark is a species of lark in the Alaudidae family. It is endemic to Japan.
Japanese Sparrowhawk - It breeds in China, Japan, Korea and Siberia; winters in Indonesia and Philippines, passing through the rest of South-east Asia. It is a bird of open and wooded areas.
Japanese Waxwing - The bird is about 18 cm in length and its plumage is mostly pinkish-brown. It has a pointed crest, a black throat, a black stripe through the eye, a pale yellow centre to the belly and a black tail with a red tip. The wings have a pattern of black, grey and white with a reddish-brown stripe running across them. The call is a high-pitched trill but there is no true song.
Japanese White-naped Crane - The White-naped Crane breeds in northeastern Mongolia, northeastern China, and adjacent areas of southeastern Russia where a program at Khinganski Nature Reserve raises eggs provided from US.
Japanese Yellow Bunting - It is 14 cm long and has a conical, grey bill, pinkish-brown feet and brown eyes. The male is grey-green above with black streaks on the back. The underparts are yellow-green with streaks on the flanks. It has black lores, a narrow black chin, a pale eyering and white outer tail-feathers. There are two bars on the wing, formed by pale tips to the median and greater wing-coverts. The female is similar to the male but paler without the black on the lores and chin. The species has a twittering song and a soft 'tsip' call.
Java Hawk Eagle - The Javan Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus bartelsi is a medium-sized, approximately 61cm long, dark brown raptor in the family Accipitridae. It has a long crest, rufous head and neck, and heavily barred black below. The crest is black with white tip. Both sexes are similar. The young is duller and has unmarked underparts.
Java sparrow - The Java Sparrow is a very gregarious bird which feeds mainly on grain and other seeds. It frequents open grassland and cultivation, and was formerly a pest in rice fields, hence its scientific name. The nest is constructed in a tree or building, and up to eight eggs are laid.
Javan Cochoa - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Javan Cuckooshrike - The Javan Cuckoo-shrike is a species of bird in the Campephagidae family. It is found in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Javan Frogmouth - The Javan Frogmouth is a species of bird in the Podargidae family. The species is sometimes known as Horsfield's Frogmouth. It is found in Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, and Thailand. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Javan Fulvetta - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Javan Grey-throated White-eye - The Javan Grey-throated White-eye is a species of bird in the Zosteropidae family. It is endemic to Indonesia.
Javan Kingfisher - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.
Javan Munia - They are known to feed on algae.
Javan Owlet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Javan Plover - Its natural habitats are sandy shores and intertidal flats. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Javan Pond-Heron - The Javan Pond Heron is typically 45 cm long with white wings, a yellow bill with a black tip, yellow eyes and legs. Its overall colour is orange, slaty and white during mating season, and brown and flecked with white out of the mating season. The non-breeding plumage is similar to that of the Chinese and Indian Pond Herons and is virtually indistinguishable in the field. It breeds from June to September. It is migratory.
Javan Scops Owl - The Javan Scops Owl is a rare owl native to Indonesia. There are no sub-species.
Javan Tesia - The Javan Tesia is a species of Old World warbler in the Cettiidae family. It is endemic to Java in Indonesia. The Javan Tesia is a small tesia with long legs and almost no tail. It feeds on insects in the undergrowth of broadleaf forests.
Javanese Cormorant - Originally described by French ornithologist Louis Jean Pierre Vieillot in 1817, this is a common and widespread bird species. It breeds in freshwater wetlands and on coasts. 3–5 eggs are laid in a nest in a tree or long grass.
Javanese Lapwing - The Javanese Lapwing, Vanellus macropterus also known as Javanese Wattled Lapwing is a wader in the lapwing family.
Javanese turtle-dove - The species has a discontinuous distribution, occurring in the Philippines and in the Indonesian islands from Java to Timor, but absent from Borneo and Sulawesi. It has also been introduced into Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands, although the population on Guam has been severely reduced by introduced brown tree snakes. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.
Jelski's Chat-Tyrant - The Jelski's Chat-tyrant is a species of bird in the Tyrannidae family. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Jerdon's Babbler - Jerdon's Babbler is an endangered passerine bird from South Asia. Formerly placed in the Timaliidae family – hence the common name "babbler" –, the genus Chrysomma and its relatives are actually closer to the typical warblers and parrotbills in the Sylviidae.
Jerdon's Baza - It is about 46 cm long. It is confusable with Crested Goshawk or the Crested Hawk-eagle in flight, but can be distinguished by the longer upright crest, very broad and rounded paddle-shaped wings
Jerdon's Courser - The Jerdon's Courser is a nocturnal bird belonging to the pratincole and courser family Glareolidae endemic to India. The bird was discovered by the surgeon-naturalist Thomas C. Jerdon in 1848 but not seen again until its rediscovery in 1986. This courser is a restricted-range endemic found locally in India in the Eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh. It is currently known only from the Sri Lankamalleshwara Sanctuary, where it inhabits sparse scrub forest with patches of bare ground.
Jet Antbird - The Jet Antbird is a species of bird in the Thamnophilidae family. It is found in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, and Venezuela. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.
Jet Manakin - The Jet Manakin is a species of bird in the Pipridae family. It is found in Ecuador and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montanes.
Jobi Manucode - This species resembles the Crinkle-collared Manucode in appearance, distinguished by its neck feathers and for having shorter tail than the latter species. As other manucodes, male is monogamous.
Johanna's Sunbird - The Johanna's Sunbird is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is found in Angola, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory Coast, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Sudan.
Johnstone's Lorikeet - Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Jouanin's petrel - It is found in Djibouti, Indonesia, Pakistan, Kenya, Maldives, Mozambique, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Somalia, the United States, and Yemen.
Juan Fernandez Firecrown - The population of this species has been in a general decline for years. A census made in October 2002 revealed fewer than 200 individual birds and of these only 60 females, although scientifically sound census methods have not yet been used to provide a reliable figure. The species is ranked Critically Endangered by Birdlife International. A conservation effort was begun in 2004 by a partnership of several organizations with the aim of preventing extinction of the species.
Juan Fernandez Tit-Tyrant - Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, rural gardens, and urban areas. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Jungle Bush Quail - The diet of the Jungle Bush Quail consists mainly of seeds. particularly of grasses, although it also takes insects. Breeding takes place after the rains and lasts until the onset of colder weather, with the precise period varying across the range; five or six eggs are produced and incubation takes between 16 and 18 days. The species is not globally threatened as it has an extensive range and tends to avoid agricultural areas. The population in Sri Lanka has contracted since the 1950s, but is thought to be widespread and common elsewhere in the range.
Jungle Crow - The Jungle Crow is a species of bird in the Corvidae family. It is found in Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Thailand.
Jungle Hawk-Owl - It lives mainly in lowland forests, montane forests, and submontane forests, living mainly on the forests' edges. It is a resident of New Guinea and Papua New Guinea.
Jungle Myna - This common passerine is typically found in forest and cultivation. The Jungle Myna builds a nest in hole. The normal clutch is 3-6 eggs.
Jungle Owlet - The Jungle Owlet or Barred Jungle Owlet, Glaucidium radiatum, is found in India and the dry zone of Sri Lanka. The species is often found singly, in pairs or small groups and are usually detected by their calls at dawn and dusk. There are two subspecies with the form found in the Western Ghats sometimes considered a full species.
Jungle Prinia - This skulking passerine bird is typically found in dry open grassland, open woodland, scrub and sometimes gardens. Jungle Prinia builds its nest in a shrub or tall grass and lays 3-5 eggs.
Junin Grebe - The scientific name commemorates the Polish zoologist Władysław Taczanowski, author of Ornithology of Peru .
Juniper Titmouse - The Juniper Titmouse, Baeolophus ridgwayi, is a passerine bird in the tit family Paridae. The American Ornithologists' Union split the Plain Titmouse into the Oak Titmouse and the Juniper Titmouse in 1996, due to distinct differences in song, preferred habitat, and genetic makeup.

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