Carolina Parakeet

Psittacus carolinensis Linneaus, 1758 Conurus carolinensis Lesson, 1831

Picture of the Carolina Parakeet has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike.
Original source: Own work
Author: Fritz Geller-GrimmPermission(Reusing this file)CC-By-SA-2.5

The Carolina Parakeet is classified as Extinct (EX), there is no reasonable doubt that the last individual has died.

The Carolina Parakeet (Conuropsis carolinensis) was the only parrot species native to the eastern United States. It was found from the Ohio Valley to the Gulf of Mexico, and lived in old forests along rivers. It was the only species at the time classified in the genus Conuropsis. It was called puzzi la née ("head of yellow") or pot pot chee by the Seminole and kelinky in Chikasha (Snyder & Russell, 2002). More

The Carolina parakeet was the northernmost representative of the parrot family. It had green plumage with a yellow head and orange cheek patches and forehead. The largest specimens were 13 in. (33 cm) in length, including the tail feathers. It was formerly distributed throughout the SE United States, as far north as Virginia and as far west as Texas; the last specimens were seen in S Florida early in the 20th cent. More

Carolina Parakeets discovered in Honduras! http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dg63q3w3_0cv7p4vgw Someone needs to edit the article. -Kiwinanday (talk) 11:16, 9 April 2009 (UTC) It was an April fools joke. The bird in the image is a Jenday Conure. Unfortunately. More

Photo: Carolina Parakeet, Conuropsis carolinensis. Carolina Parakeet, Conuropsis carolinensis More Images More

Carolina Parakeet, by John James Audubon, accession number 1863.17.026 More

The once abundant Carolina Parakeet was a gregarious bird. They would form large, noisy flocks that fed on cultivated fruits and grains. They would tear apart an apple to get to the seeds, wreck havoc in the grain fields, and strip a corncob of its kernels. Determined to protect their crops, farmers killed them in droves. It was no big deal. The pesky parakeets were plentiful. Some flocks even numbered in the thousands. I was a beautiful bird. More

Colvin, Wildlife Biologist The Carolina parakeet (Conuropsis carolinesis), possibly the most colorful bird in North America, used to be a permanent resident of the coastal plains of Alabama and probably was common to abundant. Ornithologist Thomas Imhof wrote that the Carolina parakeet bred and nested in Alabama.Now an extinct species, it was the only parakeet (or parrot) native to the eastern United States. More

carolina parakeet copyright John James AudubonMost birders in North America will probably be familiar with the rapid and shameful decline of what was probably the world’s most abundant landbird, the Passenger Pigeon Ectopistes migratorius (if you’d like a quick re-cap of how habitat destruction and uncontrolled hunting wiped out the Passenger Pigeon have a look at In Memory of Martha). More

Carolina Parakeet: Removal of a Menace The only parrot native to continental North America north of Mexico, the extinct Carolina Parakeet was a grackle-sized gregarious bird, mostly green with a yellow head and orange cheeks. The Carolina Parakeet inhabited deciduous forests and forest edges in the eastern United States as far north as the Great Lakes region, as well as wooded river bottoms of the Great Plains as far west as Nebraska. More

The Carolina Parakeet: Glimpses of a Vanished Bird Share your own customer images Search inside this book Tell the Publisher! I’d like to read this book on Kindle Don’t have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App. The Carolina Parakeet: Glimpses of a Vanished Bird (Hardcover) = ~ Noel F. R. Snyder Noel F. R. More

Carolina Parakeets by John James Audubon and R. Havell from Audubon's Birds of America (1827-1838). This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. This applies to the European Union, Canada, the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 70 years. More

Carolina parakeets were declared extinct in 1939, but the last captive bird died in 1918 and the last wild bird was killed in 1904. http://wiki.answers.com/Q/When_did_the_carolina_parake... See entire page » Why is the Carolina Parakeet extinct? The Carolina Parakeet quickly disappeared wherever U.S. settlers encroached upon their habitat. People hunted Carolina parakeets for their plumage and captured them to sell as cage birds. The last known Carolina Parakeet died in 1914 in the... http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_is_the_Carolina_Parakeet... More

that the Carolina parakeet had become extinct. At some date between 1937 and 1955, three parakeets resembling this species were sighted and filmed in the Okefenokee Swamp Georgia. However, the American Ornithologists Union concluded after analyzing the film, that they had probably filmed feral parakeets. Additional reports of the bird were made in Okeechobee County in Florida until the late 1920s, but these are not supported by specimens. More

The Carolina parakeet is an extinct species. History - Pre-Settlement Images of the Carolina parakeet have been found in prehistoric art. It is assumed that people used them for food and their feathers for ornamentation. 19th Century The Carolina parakeet was the only native parrot in eastern North America. Ohio populations centered in the Cincinnati area. More

Carolina Parakeet (Conuropsis carolinensis) and Passenger Pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) Two of our most spectacular bird species, formerly quite common, are now extinct. We're fortunate to have one of each in the collection at Duke. Searching the web, I found few large images of these two - I photographed these so folks can get a better feel for what we're missing. J. J. More

Carolina Parakeet Fine Teas are sold in the following locations: Anderson County Museum Gift Shop 202 E. Greenville St. Anderson, SC 29622 Phone: (864) 260-4737 Carolina Gourmet at Pawleys 10880 Ocean Hwy. #7 Pawleys Island, SC 29585 Phone: (843) 237-1999 or (800) 822-7741 Carolina Gourmet of Simpsonville 126 S. More

A side view of an extinct Carolina Parakeet, courtesy of the North Museum of Natural History & Science, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA. A side view of an extinct Carolina Parakeet, courtesy of the North Museum of Natural History & Science, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA. A front view of an extinct Carolina Parakeet, courtesy of the North Museum of Natural History & Science, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA. A front view of an extinct Carolina Parakeet, courtesy of the North Museum of Natural History & Science, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA. More

Picture of Conuropsis carolinensis above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike.
Original source: Fritz Geller-Grimm
Author: Fritz Geller-Grimm
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Psittaciformes
Family : Psittacidae
Genus : Conuropsis
Species : carolinensis
Authority : (Linnaeus, 1758)
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