Brimstone Canary

This species is found in in open, lightly wooded habitats, such as hillsides with trees or scrub and forest edges. In South Africa it occurs mainly in coastal areas, inhabiting coastal bush, shrubs along streams, gardens, and areas with rank vegetation. It is not truly migratory, but undertakes some seasonal movements.

Picture of the Brimstone Canary has been licensed under a GFDL
Original source: Own work
Author: JerryFriedmanOther versionsImage:Serinus sulphuratus1.jpg. This is cropped better, I hope.
Permission: GNU Free Documentation License

The Brimstone Canary is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

Brimstone Canary - seen well on the Birdquest Uganda tour (Uganda) 1 More

The Brimstone Canary or Bully Canary, Serinus sulphuratus, is a small passerine bird in the finch family. It is a resident breeder in central and southern Africa. This species is found in in open, lightly wooded habitats, such as hillsides with trees or scrub and forest edges. In South Africa it occurs mainly in coastal areas, inhabiting coastal bush, shrubs along streams, gardens, and areas with rank vegetation. It is not truly migratory, but undertakes some seasonal movements. More

Brimstone Canary photographed at Cape St Francis. More

I've got this down as an immature Brimstone Canary based on the streaking and the size of the bird, although now looking at Yellow-fronted Canary I'm doubting my call on it.Attached ThumbnailsClick image for larger version Name: 3592009124_16c12da805.jpg Views: 41 Size: 127.1 KB ID: 200366 __________________ Marcell Claassen http://elegantafrica.com/ http://rwandabirdingguide.blogspot. More

The Brimstone Canary has yellow-green upperparts, ear coverts and malar stripe. There is dark greenish streaking on the upperparts. The underparts are yellow, with a greenish wash on the flanks, and breast. The degree to which the bird is green, or yellow varies considerably across regions, Southern birds are very much more green than northern birds. More

The Brimstone Canary is present in central and southern Africa. There are three main subspecies that are differentiated by the size and intensity and color hue that can vary from yellow to green: Serinus sulphuratus sulphuratus, Serinus sulphuratus shelleyi, Serinus sulphuratus sharpii. The two sexes do not differ substantially for dimorphism. The diet of the Brimstone Canary consists of grains of panic, canary seed, millet straw, red millet, niger and small insects. More

Brimstone Canary Broad-billed Prion Broad-winged Hawk Brolga Bronze Sunbird Bronze-winged Duck Bronze-winged Jacana Bronzed Drongo Brown Booby Brown Bullfinch Brown Creeper Brown Cuckoo-dove Brown Honeyeater Brown Noddy Brown Pelican Brown Quail Brown Shrike Brown Thornbill Brown Thrasher Brown Tinamou Brown Wood Owl Brown-breasted Bulbul Brown-headed Cowbird Brown-headed Nuthatch Brubru Brush Bronze Wing Buff-banded Rail Buff-bellied Pipit Buff-necked Ibis Bull-headed Shrike Bullock's Oriole Bulwer’s Petrel Burrowing Parakeet Bush Stone-curlew Cackling Goose Cactus Wren California Gull California Quail California More

also a picture of the Brimstone Canary on page 1136. The Brimstone Canary belongs to the family of birds classified as Fringillidae. According to the Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology the Brimstone Canary is also known by these other names: Bully Seedeater, Sulphury Seedeater, Sulphur-coloured Seedeater. In the previous edition of Roberts (ie 6th edition) the Brimstone Canary was called the Bully Canary. The Robert's 7 Latin name for Brimstone Canary has changed from Serinus sulphuratus in Robert's 6 to Crithagra sulphuratus. More

Picture of Serinus sulphuratus above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial.
Original source: Blake Matheson
-Blake Matheson -Author: Blake Matheson
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Passeriformes
Family : Fringillidae
Genus : Serinus
Species : sulphuratus
Authority : (Linnaeus, 1766)
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