Striped Owl

The Striped Owl is a medium-sized owl with large ear tufts and a brownish-white facial disk rimmed with black. Its beak is black, and it has cinnamon-colored eyes. It has shorter, rounder wings than most of its close relatives. The upperparts are cinnamon with fine black vermiculation and heavy stripes. The underparts are pale tawny with dusky streaks.

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The Striped Owl is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

The Striped Owl is a medium-sized owl with large ear tufts and a brownish-white facial disk rimmed with black. Its beak is black, and it has cinnamon-colored eyes. It has shorter, rounder wings than most of its close relatives. The upperparts are cinnamon with fine black vermiculation and heavy stripes. The underparts are pale tawny with dusky streaks. It uses a variety of habitats, including riparian woodlands, marshes, savannahs, grassy open areas, and tropical rainforests. More

The Striped Owl of Central and South America is closely related to the North American Long-eared Owl. It is sometimes called a Mottled Wood-Owl. Here you can find photos and information to help identify and enjoy this beautiful owl. The Field Notes section includes a Central American range map and information on nesting, habitat, description and identification. To jump immediately to any of these sections use the Page Jump Links below. More

The first published description of the Striped Owl was made in 1807 by Louis Jean Pierre Vieillot using a Cayenne specimen. This owl was often included in the genus Rhinoptynx, but is now considered Asio. Description: This medium-sized owl has ear tufts that are well developed and projected to the sides or to the top (when disturbed) of the head. Its large ears are complex and asymmetrical, and extraordinarily sensitive. It has a strongly defined white blackish-rimmed facial disc, dark brown eyes and almost blackish bill. More

The Striped Owl first description was made by Louis Jean Pierre Vieillot in 1807, thanks to a Cayenne specimen. The male adult is a medium-sized owl with short wings and long tail. The upperparts are tawny-buff to cinnamon-buff, with fine vermiculations and heavy blackish streaks. The flight feathers and the tail are barred dark brown. On the underparts, the throat is white. Breast and belly are buffy-white, with bold blackish stripes. More

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This Striped Owl was photographed by Pete Morris in April 2002 in San Jose, Costa Rica. Click here to return to the Striped Owl Multimedia page. More

The Striped Owl is a South American owl. It's habitat ranges from Mexico in the north to Brazil and Bolivia in the south. This owl makes it's home dense deciduous lowland and seasonal forest nesting in the trees and often roosting in groups. Although study of this bird is difficult because of their habitat, the observation that has been possible reaveals that these owls hunt at night and their diet consist of small mammals. More

The Striped Owl (asio clamator) lives in South America, and parts of Central America. It uses a variety of habitats, including riparian woodlands, marshes, savannahs, grassy open areas, and tropical rainforests. It can be found from sea level to 1600 meters and above. Its systematic placement is not resolved. Different authorities place it either in Asio, in Pseudoscops together with the Jamaican Owl, or more rarely into the monotypic (= one single species) genus Rhinoptynx. More

Striped owl has black beak and cinnamon-colored eyes. Its upperparts are yellowish-brown striped with grimy brown. Its body anatomy include: Length 30-38 cm, wing span 22.8 – 29.4 cm and weight 320-546 g. It lives in savannas, open or semi-open grassland, small groves and bushes. Striped owl’s diet include: large insects, small mammals, reptiles and birds. More

Striped Owl is a seldom-encountered owl of open habitat , mostly on Panama's Pacific slope. Ridgely predicted that clearing of forests would lead to range expansion in this species, but it is unclear how hospitable agricultural areas may prove, so I'd say the jury is still out. More

The Striped Owl is a poorly-known resident of the Neotropics. Although it is a relatively large and distinctive owl, the Striped Owl is easily overlooked, and even its geographic distribution is poorly known. This is all the more surprising, since the Striped Owl is a bird of relatively open habitats, such as natural savannas, pastures, and agricultural fields as well as light woodland and even city parks. More

The Striped Owl has a very distinctive appearance. A relatively large owl with prominent "ears" or "horns" (tufts of elongated feathers on the crown), Striped Owl takes its name from the heavy black streaking on buff-colored breast and belly. Another notable feature of Striped Owl is the very white color of the facial disks, which are boldly bordered with black. The sexes are alike in appearance. No color morphs have been described in Striped Owl. More

The Mexican Striped Owl is native to Central and South America. This strange looking species of owl is related to the British Short Eared Owl and is very adaptable to a number of habitats, including forest, farmland, rainforest, suburban and urban areas. They also eat a varied diet, from small rodents and birds, to pigeons and doves, to reptiles, with spiny lizards being a particular favourite. More

Striped owlBirds in Suriname = - striped owl, young, suriname striped owl, adult, suriname Photos of a young striped owl with nearby probably its mother, made by Peter Relson in Suriname in January 2002. In the middle of Paramaribo. More

Food Habits of the Striped Owl (Asio clamator) in Buenos Aires Province, Argentina JUAN P. ISACCH, MAR�A S. B�, MARIANO M. MART�NEZ Journal of Raptor Research: 34(3): September 2000: 235-237. The Striped Owl (Asio clamator) is a widespread species from Mexico through tropical and subtropical South Amer- ica to Argentina (Grossman and Hamlet 1964, Canevari et al. 1991, Holt et al. 1999). More

including eight hooter, rain owl, wood owl, and striped owl, but is probably known best as the hoot owl. Uploaded: 11.04.09 License: Attr-Noncom 3. More

Striped Owl, Brazil, REGUA November 2008 © Lee Dingain Guapi Assu Bird Lodge, REGUA Striped Owl - Striped Owl, Panama, Las Macanas Marshes Jan 2010 © Mikael Bauer Striped Owl - Showing Records 1 through 4 of 4 Total Records More

The Peruvian Striped Owl is generally found in thin tropical forests, in fields and marshes, but avoiding dense forest. It will hunt over clearings, farmland,and forest edges. It has a range of habitats that stretches from sea level to 5000 feet in elevation. More

Picture of Pseudoscops clamator above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution.
Original source: Chris Gladis from Kyoto, Japan
Author: Chris Gladis from Kyoto, Japan
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Strigiformes
Family : Strigidae
Genus : Pseudoscops
Species : clamator
Authority : (Vieillot, 1807)
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