Black Currawong

The Black Currawong was first described by ornithologist John Gould in 1837.

Picture of the Black Currawong has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike.
Original source: Own work
Author: Noodle snacks (http://www.noodlesnacks.com/)Camera location

The Black Currawong is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

The Black Currawong is evaluated as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. One of its subspecies, Strepera fuliginosa colei of King Island is Vulnerable to extinction. More

The Black Currawong is endemic to Tasmania and lives in a range of habitats. They can be noisy, especially when there are a lot in one area. They have a distinctive call. This Currawong sat up and posed for me as I took the shot, I'm sure he must have had his photo taken before. More

The Black Currawong is confined and endemic to temperate forests of Tasmania and two islands in Bass Strait. It can become very tame, much like its close relative, the Pied Currawong on the Australian mainland. There are three subspecies of the Black Currawong: * The nominate form Strepera fuliginosa fuliginosa of Tasmania, * Strepera fuliginosa parvior of Flinders Island and * Strepera fuliginosa colei of King Island. More

The Black Currawong is an altitudinal 'migrant', inhabiting the highland areas during the warmer months, and lower areas during the Winter. At times they form flocks of upto a hundred or so. The similar,Grey, or Clinking Currawong, is rarely seen with this species, prefering drier areas. The lower image, shows a juvenile bird, with a browner appearance, and a yellow gape. This weekend I'm attending a seminar on hawk ID, organised by the Illinois Ornithological Society. More

The Black Currawong was widely eaten in the early days of European settlement in Tasmania and said to be quite tasty. Facts and figures Research Species: No Minimum size: 47 cm Maximum size: 49 cm Average size: 48 cm Average weight: 374 g Breeding season: August to December Clutch size: Two to four. More

26 In Tasmania, the Black Currawong is similar but has a heavier bill and call similar to the Pied and lacks the white rump. More

The endemic Black Currawong is a large bird, up to 490mm, completely black, except white-tipped tail feathers and a small patch of white in the wing. The eye is a bright yellow. Habitat Common throughout the highlands of Tasmania in subalpine forest and woodland, often moving to lower altitudes during the winter, when it can form flocks of up to 50 individuals. More

Black Currawong is an endemic bird of Tasmania, Australia that will eat almost anything. On the photograph below it’s enjoying a lizzard. Being related to ravens they are known for their intelligence and learning abilities. Tourists visiting Tasmania are warned that those birds can steal food from your hand and even break in to (by unzipping) your backpack and helping them selves to whatever you may have there. More

The Black Currawong is confined to Tasmania and its surrounding islands. Habitat The Black Currawong occurs in a range of habitats in Tasmania, including mountain and lowland forests, coastal heath, grazing lands and suburban areas. Behaviour and adaptations Seasonality The Black Currawong moves down from mountain areas to the milder lowlands in winter. More

Black Currawong in Snow by Joe Shemesh7 months ago 38. Tasmanian Devil by Joe Shemesh7 months ago 37. Sun-rays & Forest by Joe Shemesh7 months ago 36. Black Currawong by Joe Shemesh7 months ago 35. Cradle Mt Snow Time-lapse by Joe Shemesh7 months ago 34. Cradle Mt Time-lapse 5 by Joe Shemesh7 months ago 33. Cradle Mt Aerial 3 by Joe Shemesh7 months ago 32. Cradle Mt Aerial 2 by Joe Shemesh7 months ago 31. More

The black currawong – endemic to Tasmania and a common visitor to Collinsvale. * " AERIAL ACROBATICS " by helmutk Pied Currawong common nomad in forest, woodland urban and rural areas. / Shooting Info , / Nikon D700 / Nikon 70mm- 200mm @ 105 mm / Iso 3200 / AP f4 / Exposure 1/ 4000sec. More

* The Black Currawong (Stepera fuliginosa) is confined to Tasmania and is all black except for a small white patch in the wing and a white-tipped tail. Like all currawongs, it builds a large cup-nest out of sticks, lined with softer material, and placed in a tall tree. More

The black currawong is a robust bird with a hint of white on its flight feathers and the tips of its tail. It is alert and noisy and can be found throughout Tasmania. Bushwalkers can testify to the bird's ingenious nature. Many have left their backpacks on a main track while they explore a side-walk only to find their backpack opened and lunchbox raided when they return. The bird eats berries and other vegetables. More

species, the Black Currawong, is only found in Tasmania. They are crow-like but slightly sleeker and are quite clever birds. This is a larger piece than alot of my other works, it measures(image size)25.5 cm x 33cm (9 inches x 13inches)and is one in an edition of 12. It is printed using high quality charbonnel printmaking ink onto beautiful warm white hahnemuhle 100% rag paper. This etching is a sugarlift etching. More

The endemic black currawong (Strepera fuliginosa) is common throughout the highlands of Tasmania in subalpine forest and woodland, often moving to lower altitudes during the winter. It is completely black, except for white-tipped tail feathers and a small patch of white in the wing. The black currawong is a opportunistic feeder, taking a wide range of food items, including lizards, mice, invertebrates and fruits. More

Black Currawong on tree root. More

Picture of Strepera fuliginosa above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike license.
Original source: Arthur Chapman
Author: Arthur Chapman
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Passeriformes
Family : Cracticidae
Genus : Strepera
Species : fuliginosa
Authority : (Gould, 1837)
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