Spanish Imperial Eagle

The Imperial Eagle, Aquila heliaca, is very similar to the Golden Eagle, but slightly smaller in body length and wingspan . Like all eagles, A. heliaca belongs to the bird of prey family Accipitridae.

Picture of the Spanish Imperial Eagle has been licensed under a GFDL
Original source: Donada por el autor a Usurio:Digigalos
Author: Antonio Lucio Carrasco GómezPermission(Reusing this file)GFDL
Permission: GNU Free Documentation License

The Spanish Imperial Eagle is classified as Vulnerable (VU), considered to be facing a high risk of extinction in the wild.

The Spanish Imperial Eagle (Aquila adalberti) is probably the most typical Spanish bimbo. El Aguila Imperial es la rapaz más representativa de España, siendo un autentico simbolo de nobleza y belleza española. This stunning eagle was at high risk of extinction only a short time ago, nowadays is increasing and has a range/status of about 150 pairs in the whole world, mainly in Spain. More

Trajadilla and I had an adult Spanish Imperial Eagle fly past at Mirador de la Bascula. ... Surfbirds Birding Trip Report: Birding Trip to Extremadura - 7th -... - Jun 7, 2006 Surfbirds NewsThe targets were to find Spanish Imperial Eagle and Great Bustard and to enjoy a few ... Fortunately a Spanish Imperial Eagle chick had not left the nest. ... More

, 2002), the Spanish Imperial Eagle was considered to be a subspecies of the Eastern Imperial Eagle, but is now widely recognised as a separate species due to differences in morphology (Cramp & Simmons, 1980), ecology (Meyburg, 1994), and molecular characteristics (Seibold et al., 1996; Padilla et al., 1999). The Spanish Imperial Eagle is smaller, 2.5–3.5 kg (5.5–7.7 lbs) and 75–84 cm (30–33 in) in length, and darker than its eastern cousin, and is a resident species (A. More

Spanish imperial eagle, its world population only about 170 pairs; the black vulture, Europe’s largest bird of prey; and the rare black stork,” says Mario Diáz, Associate Professor of Zoology at Castilla La Mancha University and a dehesa expert. Spanish imperial eagle. (Juan M. Simón) Wildcats, Iberian lynx, and the more widespread common genets—a small, long-tailed, cat-like mammal sacred to the ancient Egyptians—patrol the dehesa at night, hunting for smaller mammals and birds. More

boundaries and the Spanish Imperial Eagle is no exception. The birds breeding in Extramadura are sometimes seen down in Guadarrama and occasionally over in the Doñana, boosting the chances of seeing this bird here. The La Janda area near Cadiz report a breeding pair for the first time in fifty years, one bird being from the re-introduction programme there and the other from outside Andalucia. Unfortunately, in April this year, three Imperial Eagles were found poisoned in La Janda. More

The Spanish imperial eagle is classified as Vulnerable (VU) on the IUCN Red List 2006 (1) and is listed on Appendices I and II of both CITES (3) and the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS or Bonn Convention) (4). It is also listed on Appendices II and III of the Berne Convention of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats (5) and Annex I of the EC Birds Directive (6). More

The Spanish Imperial Eagle is smaller, 2.5–3.5 kg (5.5–7.7 lbs) and 75–84 cm (30–33 in) in length, and darker than its eastern cousin, and is a resident species (A. heliaca migrates to the southeast during winter). Diet / Feeding It feeds mainly on rabbits, but can prey on many other animals, such as partridges, rodents, hares, pigeons, crows, ducks and even dogs. More

, 2002), the Spanish Imperial Eagle was considered to be a subspecies of the Imperial Eagle, but is now widely regarded as being a separate species due to differences in morphology (Cramp & Simmons, 1980), ecology (Meyburg, 1994), and molecular characteristics (Seibold et al., 1996; Padilla et al., 1999). See more at Wikipedia.org... More

For the purposes of our bird news services, Spanish Imperial Eagle is classed as Mega: species which have not yet occurred in the British Isles or are exceedingly rare, or are otherwise highly desirable. More

Alejandro Tor More

J Martin Simon The Spanish Imperial Eagle is a flagship species in Spain. Zoom In “Flying High” conserving the Spanish Imperial Eagle = 13-05-2009 The Flying High Programme, (Alzando el vuelo in Spanish), was created by SEO/BirdLife (BirdLife in Spain) in 2006 and has just begun its second phase. More

The Spanish Imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) is the most threatened eagle in Europe. This species, endemic to the south-west of the Iberian Peninsula, has suffered a decline in the recent past, due to both the collapse of the populations of its staple prey, the European rabbit (from two viral diseases, myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease), and direct and indirect persecution. The remaining population is at present stable but fragmented and showing extremely reduced genetic variability. More

Spanish Imperial Eagle, Spain, May 2009, © Markus Jais Names - English: Spanish Imperial Eagle Scientific: Aquila adalberti German: Spanischer Kaiseradler Spanish: Águila imperial ibérica French: Aigle ibérique Taxanomy and Subspecies - Formerly considerd a subspecies of the Eastern Imperial Eagle. Today treated as a seperate species. Forms a superspecies with the Eastern Imperial Eagle. More

Probable Spanish Imperial Eagle, Pyrenees, Spain = This is one of a series of photos taken by Dutch bird photographer Frank Dröge on Thursday 18th March at our Lamergeier feding station and photography site in the Pre-Pyrenes of Catalonia, Spain. The rest can be sen here They show what is obviously a juvenile Aquila eagle, but one which is not a Golden Eagle Aquila chrysaetos, the only Aquila eagle that could be expected in the region. More

See Origin of Spanish imperial eagle + Success for Imperial Eagle in Do More

The Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) has recovered “spectacularly” over the past 30 years, and is one of the success stories of conservation in Spain, increasing from 38 pairs in 1974 to 253 in 2008. The latest figures are from a study published recently in the journal Oryx and in this interview from Science Daily. “This study shows that the species has recovered and has responded well to conservation initiatives. More

The Spanish Imperial Eagle is one of the smaller eagles and its most distinctive characteristic is its very dark feathers. Navigation: Description Description - Latin Name: Aquila adalberti Distribution: Spain The Spanish Imperial Eagle makes its diet up of various rodents including predominantly rabbits. More

The Spanish Imperial Eagle is the most endangered eagle of Europe. With an estimated population of approximately 120 pairs, it is also one of the most scarce birds of prey on earth. Its distribution is limited to Mediterranean habitats of south-western Spain. This book deals with the ecology of the Spanish Imperial Eagle. It contains all available, up-to-date information on the species, most of which is the result of the scientific work carried out by Miguel Ferrer over the past eleven years. More

Spanish Imperial Eagle is classified as Endangered species. It has restricted habitat and numerous threats make of this eagle the rarest bird of prey in the world. Adult male is very similar to the Eastern Imperial Eagle (Aquila heliaca), but the Spanish Imperial Eagle shows conspicuous white leading edges of the wings on the lesser coverts. The plumage is reddish-brown overall, without any streaks, but we can see several irregular white patches on scapulars. More

red list, the Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) is recovering in Spain. The species has undergone an increase from 38 pairs in 1974 to 253 in 2008, data viewed as hopeful by the scientists who carried out the demographic study on the Iberian Peninsula. More

The Spanish Imperial Eagle (aquila adalberti) is one of the two species from aquila genus which breed in the Iberian peninsula. It is very bound to the Mediterranean ecosystems but only found in four large areas within South and Central Spain. More

The Spanish imperial eagle is endemic to Iberia. They suffered a reduction in population numbers from 1900 up to the 1966 from human persecution leaving only 30 pairs. Great efforts have been made to prevent their extinction and in the 2007 IUCN red list of endangered species they have been lowered to the status of “Vulnerable”. Wing span 177 to 200cms. Head to tail 75 to 84cms. More

Picture of Aquila heliaca above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike license.
Original source: Bernd Kirschner
Author: Bernd Kirschner
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Falconiformes
Family : Accipitridae
Genus : Aquila
Species : heliaca
Authority : Savigny, 1809
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