Iceland Gull

The Iceland Gull, Larus glaucoides, is a large gull which breeds in the Arctic regions of Canada and Greenland, but not Iceland, where it is only seen in the winter. It is migratory, wintering from in the North Atlantic as far south as the British Isles and northernmost states of the eastern USA, as well as in the interior of North America as far W as the western Great Lakes. It is much scarcer in Europe than the similar Glaucous Gull.

Picture of the Iceland Gull has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution.
Original source: Flickr
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The Iceland Gull is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

The Iceland Gull is separated into 2 subspecies based predominantly on markings and patterning of primary-feathers of adults. Thayer’s Gull is monotypic. While the breeding ranges of these species approach closely or narrowly overlap, a precise definition being elusive, the chief wintering ranges for these species are rather widely disjunct. More

The ICELAND GULL was seen with the GLAUCOUS GULL for comparison. The THAYER'S GULL, ICELAND GULL, and GLAUCOUS GULL were relocated by other birders. I am not sure of all there names, but Jerry Paine (nice guy) and his wife got to see them. It took me till this afternoon to finally get some decent shots of the Glaucous Gull. I was also able to get photos of the GREEN HERON. More

The Iceland Gull, Larus glaucoides, is a large gull which breeds in the Arctic regions of Canada and Greenland, but not Iceland, where it is only seen in the winter. It is migratory, wintering from in the North Atlantic as far south as the British Isles and northernmost states of the eastern USA, as well as in the interior of North America as far W as the western Great Lakes. It is much scarcer in Europe than the similar Glaucous Gull. More

Iceland Gull is considerably smaller, especially in its head and bill. The immatures of the two subspecies may be difficult to distinguish in life, although "Kumlien's gull" generally has dusky primaries. Both may be studied about docks in winter, but the number of "white-winged" gulls that winter here varies considerably from year to year. More

Iceland Gull - Larus glaucoidesThe Iceland Gull is a pale northern Gull, normally found in the Arctic in summer, and the northern Atlantic coast in winter. It only actually occurs in Iceland during the winter months. They are very closely related to the Thayer's Gull, and many believe them to be slightly different races of the same species. Iceland Gulls are typically found further east in North America, while Thayer's Gulls are typically found further west. Habitat: Breeds on rocky cliffs in the Arctic. More

Iceland Gulls breed in the Canadian high Arctic on cliffs, and sometimes go farther south along the Atlantic Coast in winter. In North America, the subspecies mainly is kumlieni, and sometimes called "Kumlien's Gull." The Iceland Gull adult has a pale gray back and wings. The slightly darker gray marks are variable on 1-5 of the outermost primaries, usually the outermost primary tends to have extensive white at the tip. More

stormy winters of the North Atlantic, the Iceland Gull is a hardy seabird. For bird watchers, this pale, medium-sized gull heralds winter. The Iceland Gull is very closely related to the Thayer's Gull; disputes over their separation or combination have long interested gull aficionados and geneticists. Appearance: The Iceland Gull is a medium-sized seabird, weighing 1.8 pounds, and measuring about 22 inches long, with a 54-inch wingspan. In North America, observers are most likely to spot immature birds. More

Iceland Gull: Breeds in southern Greenland, southern Baffin Island, northwestern Quebec, and on islands in northern Hudson Bay. Spends winters in Europe, Iceland, and eastern North America south to New Jersey. Nests on rocky coasts, on tall cliffs; prefers coastal habitats in harbors, large reservoirs, and nearby landfills. Listen to Call Voice Text "kyow-yow-yow" Interesting Facts * The Iceland Gull is divided into two subspecies. More

The Iceland Gull is closely related to the Thayer’s and Glaucous gulls, and its taxonomy is unstable and controversial. It feeds on fish, carrion, offal near settlements, marine invertebrates, and the eggs and young of other birds. It feeds principally on items taken from the surface of the sea, but also forages at garbage dumps and sewage plants. It is preyed on by Gyrfalcon, Peregrine Falcon, and Arctic Fox. Its populations in southwestern and eastern Greenland is estimated at 40,000 pairs. More

A pale gull of the north Atlantic, the Iceland Gull breeds in the high Arctic and winters south of the Maritime Provinces only in small numbers. More

Iceland Gulls nor clear Thayer's Gulls), but birds that are typically looking more like a Thayer's 'type' with some Iceland 'types' thrown in on occasion, as well as some 'tweeners' that are probably just that. I've always noted that photos of west coast Thayer's make the birds look a lot darker than every one I've ever seen in Ky, so maybe they are ALL 'tweeners' here. More

A classic adult Iceland Gull has all-white primaries and yellow eyes, and resembles a smaller, delicately built version of a Glaucous Gull. The “typical” adult Thayer’s Gull has brown eyes and shows some black on the upperside of the primary tips. However, individual birds can and do exhibit much overlap in these characteristics. Only one of the two subspecies of Iceland Gull is regularly found in Canada and the United States—L.g. kumlieni, commonly known as Kumlien’s Gull. (The other subspecies, L.g. More

As with the Glaucous Gull, Iceland Gull is a regular but scarce winter visitor to the West Midlands Region. Prior to around 1990 it was recorded less frequently than Glaucous Gull but, during the early 1990s, numbers of Iceland Gulls increased at the same time as Glaucous Gull became scarcer. Iceland Gull too has declined during the early 2000s and the two species are currently recorded with similar frequency. In 2005 there were 12 Iceland Gulls compared with 14 Glaucous Gulls. More

When we first saw the Iceland Gull yesterday about 1:15 pm on January 25, 2009, it was on the Gwinnett side of the lake. We were at the lower overlook (east of the dam). From the bottom of the parking area, we set the scope up and could see a group of mostly juvenile Ring-billed Gulls far out past the point were the visitors center is located. They were perched on something jutting out of the water that was about ten or twelve feet long. More

These Iceland Gulls were digiscoped on the Toronto, Ontario, waterfront of Lake Ontario during the winter of 2003 using a Nikon Coolpix 4500 camera and a Swarovski ST-80HD telescope with 20 x 60 zoom telescope. The variation in wingtip coloration and pattern ranges from white with no pigmentation to blackish with mirrors. Photo 1. Iceland Gull with white wingtips in Toronto, 14 January 2003. Photo 2. More

* Iceland Gull At Union Wharf Iceland Gull At Union Wharf 01:58 * * Iceland Gull Iceland Gull 01:11 * * 3rd Winter Kumlien's Iceland Gull In ... More

"Pic of Iceland Gull in Ness I took on Sunday attached. A juv. More

Iceland Gulls are omnivores like most of the Larus gulls. They forage on land and sea. They eat molluscs, fish, scraps, offal, eggs. They also scavenge roadkill, or at rubbish dumps, sewage outlets or places where there is fish waste. Glaucous GullThe most similar bird to the Iceland Gull is the Glaucous gull. More

* Iceland Gull Comparison Shot Iceland Gull Comparison Shot * Pale Thayer's-like Gull showing mottled tertials and pale base to bill. Pale Thayer’s-like Gull showin... View All Community Search Results ▶ Advertisement Random Links: * Camera full? Upload now! * Photo gifts are awesome. More

Picture of Larus glaucoides above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike license.
Original source: Andy Jones
Author: Andy Jones
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Charadriiformes
Family : Laridae
Genus : Larus
Species : glaucoides
Authority : Meyer, 1822
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