Laughing Gull

The Laughing Gull, Leucophaeus atricilla, is a medium-sized gull of North and South America. It breeds on the Atlantic coast of North America, the Caribbean, and northern South America. Northernmost populations migrate further south in winter, and this species occurs as a rare vagrant to western Europe. The Laughing Gull's English name is derived from its raucous kee-agh call, which sounds like a high-pitched laugh ha... ha... ha...

The Laughing Gull is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

Browse: Home / Birds, Bugs / Laughing Gulls in winter Laughing Gulls in winter - By Charlie • December 21, 2008 • 4 comments The Laughing Gull Larus (or Leucophaeus if you go by the 49th Supplement to the A.O.U. Check-list of North American Birds) atricilla, is a common, medium-sized gull of North and South America. It breeds on the Atlantic coast of North America, the Caribbean, and northern South America. More

DISTRIBUTION and HABITAT: Laughing gulls live mainly on salt larshes amd lakes, such as the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States, ranging from Maine down through Florida and Texas. LINKS: WWW.NCAUDUBON.ORG/WB_02.HTML WWW.IMPERIAL.CC.CA.US/BIRDS/1-GULL.HTM WWW.GEOCITIES.COM/~ORIG_SEAHAWK/GULL.HTML WWW.ASSATEAGUE.COM/LAUGH.HTML WWW.HONOLULUZOO.ORG/LAUGHING_GULL.HTM With special thanks to Ms. Smith for helping me build this website. This web page was created by Michelle H., as part of the Galveston Bay Project for Girls, 1999. More

The Laughing Gull is a medium sized Gull of North and South America, and is the only Gull nesting in the Caribbean. The Northernmost populations migrate further south in winter, and has occurred as a very rare vagrant in Western Europe. It has a black head during breeding season which turns mottled grey during winter, otherwise it More

Laughing Gull in flight Conservation status Least Concern (IUCN 3.1) Scientific classification Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves Order: Charadriiformes Family: Laridae Genus: Leucophaeus Species: L. More

The Laughing Gull has a current evaluation of Least Concern. The prior rating for this bird species was Lower Risk. At this time the range and population of this bird species are considered to be stable enough to warrant no immediate concerns. The range of the Laughing Gull is estimated at about 400,000 square kilometers. The population of this bird species could be as high as almost 1 million individual birds. More

Evidence that Laughing Gulls once nested throughout Nova Scotia is provided by Bryant (1857), who collected two pairs in summer 1856 on Green Island, Yarmouth County, the females with enlarged oviducts. Langille (1892) observed "some eight or ten Laughing Gulls, among clouds of terns" and found one nest with two fresh eggs of this species on Flat Island, near Tancook, Lunenburg County. Residents of Seal Island told Louis B. Bishop in August 1909 of a breeding colony on one of the small islands nearby (Piers' notes). More

The Laughing Gull lives in colonies that can consist of thousands of nests. The female lays 2-4 eggs that are incubated by both the female and the male. They are known as scavengers that help keep the surrounding beaches clean of dead fish and garbage. They are also known to be thieves and will steal food directly out of the beaks of other birds. Image courtesy of venezuelatuya. More

A smallish gull with a black head, the Laughing Gull is abundant along the southern Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Infrequently found away from the ocean, it takes advantage of human habitat modifications, foraging in parking lots and dumps, and breeding on dredge spoil islands. More

The Laughing Gull, Leucophaeus atricilla, is a medium-sized gull of North and South America. It breeds on the Atlantic coast of North America, the Caribbean, and northern South America. Northernmost populations migrate further south in winter, and this species occurs as a rare vagrant to western Europe. (There was an influx into North-west Europe in late October 2005 when at least 18, possibly as many as 35, individuals occurred on one day in the UK alone. More

Laughing Gulls (Larus atricilla) are a comical and noisy member of the Eastern Egg Rock bird community. There are about 600 pairs of Laughing Gulls nesting on the island, making them second in numbers to only Common Terns. Their raucous calls are heard all day long by researchers on the island. More

Laughing Gull The Laughing Gull, Larus atricilla, is a medium-sized gull of North and South America. It breeds on the Atlantic coast of North America, the Caribbean, southern California, USA, and northern South America. More

You can see a Laughing Gull in winter plumage below: Laughing Gull, LARUS ATRICILLA Theoretically you can see about eight gull species in the Yucat More

The Laughing gull is about 16 inches in length. Its white body is covered by a slate-gray mantle and nearly black hood which extends further on the throat than on the back of the head. During the breeding season its breast has a faint rose blush. Laughing Gulls lose their dark feathers during the fall molt and are white-headed in winter. More

Laughing Gull Laughing Gull image © Barbara Edmondson Family: (Laridae) Gulls, Terns and Allies Preferred Habitat: Beaches and salt marshes. Seasonal Occurrence: Abundant throughout the year. Notes: Anyone who has taken the Bolivar Ferry has had abundant exposure to Laughing Gulls. They are by far the most common gull in our area. Furthermore, according to Robert McFarlane, Coordinator of the Houston Bird Survey, "they are the most abundant colonial waterbird in Texas. More

Laughing gullThe laughing gull is medium-sized gull 15-17 inches in length, with a wingspan of 37-47 inches. It has a white head, throat, breast, tail, and belly; a slate gray back; slate gray wings with back tips; and a dark red bill that is slightly hooked on the end. Its feet and legs are a reddish black. In the winter, its head and bill are black. Males and females look alike. More

Laughing Gull in breeding plumage has black head, black legs and feet, and red bill. Neck and underwing, belly and tail are white. Upperwing is dark grey with black tips. In winter plumage, head becomes white and bill is black. Young are mottled brown, belly is white, and bill, end of wings, legs, feet and tail are black. The 1st winter has dark grey back, and head and neck become white. More

the laughing gull can be done by several distinguishing features. The Franklin’s gull’s body, bill and legs are smaller than the laughing gull. The bill of the Franklin’s gull does not droop at the tip as it does on the laughing gull. The Franklin’s gull also has more apparent white eye rings and it displays more white on the primary tips of its wings. The song is a shrill, laughing kuk-kuk-kuk, similar to the laughing gull’s, but higher pitched. More

Laughing Gull - at the 'Forks of the Delaware' in Easton, Northampton County; March 13, 2005. Photo by Dave DeReamus. This photo shows the dusky head, the white arcs around the eye, and the dark bill, legs, and wingtips. This immature bird was spotted by Mike Schall on the pretty early date of March 12th. This coastal gull is a fairly rare find for most areas of Pennsylvania. Most are found during or after storms with easterly winds. More

In my observation of the Laughing Gull, I've noted that it can be an aggressive species in how it will attempt to steal food from other birds including the White Ibis, Brown Pelican, and Sandwich Tern. The Laughing Gull will use this tactic in numbers. I'm not sure if the attack is a cooperative effort of the group or simply an every bird for itself frenzy. Nonetheless, I consider the Laughing Gull an alluring species in the avian world. More

Laughing Gull - Larus atricillaNamed for its well-known laughing call, the Laughing Gull is a common sight (and sound) of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. They have the unusual habit of stealing food from Brown Pelicans, landing on their heads and stealing fish from the Pelican's large pouch. Rarely seen inland, the Laughing Gull is a rare visitor to the state. More

Named for its well-known laughing call, the Laughing Gull is a common sight along the Atlantic Coast. They are a social bird and are often seen (and heard) in large flocks. More scavenger than hunter, they pick the beach clean of editable trash and fish stranded by the tide. They are often referred to as "Sea Gulls" but rarely venture beyond the shore. Description - type=text Laughing Gull by Raymond Gehman th_120px-Laughing_gull_St_Thomas-1. More

vues KillbotLuna — 12 mars 2008 — A laughing gull doing what it does best. KillbotLuna — 12 mars 2008 — A laughing gull doing what it does best. More

Laughing Gulls breed in coastal marshes and ponds as far north in large colonies. The large nest, made largely from grasses, is constructed on the ground. The 3 or 4 greenish eggs are incubated for about three weeks. These are omnivores like most Larus gulls, and they will scavenge as well as seeking suitable small prey. More

Picture of Larus atricilla above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike license.
Original source: Collection Georges Declercq
Author: Collection Georges Declercq
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Charadriiformes
Family : Laridae
Genus : Larus
Species : atricilla
Authority : Linnaeus, 1758
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