Spectacled eider

The lined nest is built on tundra close to the sea, and 5–9 eggs are laid. This species dives for crustaceans and molluscs. The winter range is poorly known, but satellite tracking has led to observations of large flocks of the birds about 100 km southwest of St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea during March-April. This area has large populations of bivalves in the underlying sediments at depths of about 60 m that the ducks dive to feed on.

The Spectacled eider is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

* Protecting Spectacled Eiders at Sea (pdf) 2001 * News Release January 12, 2001 * Final Rule (Federal Register)(pdf) * Photo Gallery * Range Map * Critical Habitat Map * Fact Sheet (HTML format) or (PDF format ) More

Historically, spectacled eiders nested along much of the coast of Alaska, from the Nushagak Peninsula in the southwest, north to Barrow, and east nearly to the Canadian border. They also nested along much of the arctic coast of Russia. Today, three primary nesting grounds remain; the central coast of the Yukon‑Kuskokwim Delta, the arctic coastal plain of Alaska, and the arctic coastal plain of Russia. A few pairs nest on St. Lawrence Island as well. More

Justification: The vast majority of Spectacled Eiders breed in East Asia and return to the Alaskan Bering Sea each fall to molt and winter. Background: Spectacled Eiders breed in three geographically distinct areas: the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain, and the Siberian Arctic (Petersen et al. 2000). Birds from all three breeding populations winter in large mixed flocks in the Bering Sea (Petersen et al. 1999). More

Spectacled Eider Satellite Telemetry Research at the Alaska Science Center = Female spectacled eider on a nest Spectacled Eiders (Somateria fischeri) are large sea ducks that spend 9 to 12 months of the year in marine habitat (Petersen et al. 1999). At sea, eiders forage on clams, polychaete worms, and other organisms on the sea floor. In winter, the world population of Spectacled Eiders group at a single site south of St. More

population of spectacled eiders were discovered between St. Lawrence and St. Mathews Islands in the Bering Sea. Inhabiting sub-arctic and arctic environments, spectacled eiders, like their cousins, live in some of the most remote and extreme environments on earth. Spectacled eider populations inhabit the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta along the western Alaska, the North Slope of Alaska, and the arctic coast of eastern Russia. Global population estimates vary up to 375,000, the majority of which represents the spectacled eider population breeding in Russia. More

Alaska, the Spectacled Eider was listed as Threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act in 1993. There are 3 disjunct coastal breeding populations of Spectacled Eiders: 2 in Alaska and 1 in Russia. In the 1970s, more individuals nested in western Alaska than in arctic Russia and the remainder of Alaska. Currently (1993–1999), the Russian population is much larger than those in western and northern Alaska. Spectacled Eiders molt at sea, 2–45 kilometers from shore, north of 63°N. More

The Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri) is a large sea duck, which breeds on the coasts of Alaska and northeastern Siberia. nest of a Spectacled Eider The lined nest is built on tundra close to the sea, and 5–9 eggs are laid. This species dives for crustaceans and molluscs. The winter range is poorly known, but satellite tracking has led to observations of large flocks of the birds about 100 km southwest of St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea during March-April. More

Spectacled Eider: Feeds by diving into muddy waters of coastal estuaries for crustaceans, mollusks, and plant material. Vocalization Spectacled Eider: Breeding male utters a weak "ho-hoo" sound in courtship. Similar Species Spectacled Eider: Common Eider has a white breast and black crown. King Eider has large orange bill shield. Both lack "goggles" . More

Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri) blue dot Sea Duck Information Series blue dot Identification and Basic Life History blue dot Range Map blue dot Species Status Summaries (pdf 732kb) blue dot More Photos Jan's Ornamental Waterfowl Pages blue dot Related Web sites Alaska Dept. More

Spectacled Eiders: Threatened Sea Duck on the NPR-A http://wwwndo.ak.blm.gov/npra/sympos/html/paper23.html Population Dynamics Of Spectacled Eiders On The Yukon- Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska GRAND, J. BARRY. Alaska Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, 1011 E. Tudor Road, Anchorage, Alaska 99503 FLINT, PAUL L. Alaska Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, 1011 E. Tudor Road, Anchorage, Alaska 99503 ROCKWELL, ROBERT F. Dept. More

Range & Distribution: The Spectacled Eider breeds in Western Alaska on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta and along the northern Alaskan coast from Wainwright eastward to Camden Bay. In Siberia, this sea duck also breeds around the deltas of the Yena, Indigirka, and Kolyma rivers. Critical molting areas include Alaska's Ledyard Bay and Norton Sound. The Spectacled Eider winters in the Bering Sea, south of St. Lawrence Island. More

Spectacled Eider: Smallest of the Eiders, has orange bill, white upperparts, black underparts, breast, and sides, black pointed tail, yellow-green head and large white "goggles" bordered with black. White feathers on upper mandible extend past nostril. Females are mottled brown overall with gray bill and juveniles resemble females. Range and Habitat Spectacled Eider: Found along the arctic coastal plains of Alaska, Russia, and the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Prefers open sea and tundra. More

Females and young spectacled eiders have light brown patches around the eye. Other unique characteristics of these birds are the pale blue iris of the eye and facial plumage that extends halfway down the bill to the nostrils. Although the breeding distribution extends from northcentral Siberia to the Yukon Territory along the Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska and south to northern Bristol Bay, spectacled eiders in Alaska historically have been most abundant on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta and North Slope. More

Spectacled eider has a black chest and white back, a green head with a long, sloping forehead, and distinctive white eye patches. Young birds and females are brown with pale brown eye patches. Habitats and Habits Spectacled eiders nest in wet tundra near ponds on the Arctic coasts of Alaska and Russia and on the coast of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in Alaska. Nesting pairs arrive together each spring, but the males leave after egg incubation begins. More

Stellers Eiders, Spectacled Eiders and Emperor Goose hunting is closed to all sport hunting in Alaska due to the continued reported decline by USFW biologist, We have heard rumors that if the emperor goose populations continue to climb than there could possibly be a limited open season in the future, according to our information they will probably never open up Spectacled and Steller's Eiders to sport hunting due to there lack of biological data to back it up. More

The Spectacled Eider (Somateria fischeri) is a large sea duck, which breeds on the coasts of Alaska and northeastern Siberia. It winters in often enormous flocks at sea in the Arctic along the edge of the pack ice. The binomial commemorates the German scientist Johann Fischer von Waldheim. Spectacled Eider NestNesting / Breeding: The lined nest is built on tundra close to the sea, and 5-9 eggs are laid. More

diving duck called the Spectacled Eider – they migrate from areas of coastal tundra where they nest and breed to important feeding areas which are in the shallow areas of the Bering Sea. The ducks will dive in these freezing temperatures some 60-70 metres beneath the ice to feed off the bottom-dwelling prey to be found in the sediment of the sea bed – worms, clams, etc. More

The male spectacled eider is unique. The painted head of this large sea duck ranges in color from pale green to bright orange, making it one handsome bird. Gaze closely and the distinctive “goggles” or “spectacles” around the eyes that give this eider its name come into focus. Yet all the finery fades away when the mating season ends, and male eiders once again resemble females in their appearance. More

* States/US Territories in which the Spectacled eider is known to occur: Alaska * US Counties in which the Spectacled eider is known to occur: View All * USFWS Refuges in which the Spectacled eider is known to occur: ALASKA MARITIME NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE , ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE , TOGIAK NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE , YUKON DELTA NATIONAL WILDLIFE More

square miles of critical habitat for the spectacled eider in Alaska in four different locations: in the Bering Sea between St. Lawrence and St. Matthew islands; in Norton Sound east of Nome; in Ledyard Bay between Cape Lisburne and Icy Cape; and on the coastal fringe of parts of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. More than 97 percent of spectacled eider critical habitat is in marine waters seldom used by commercial fishermen. More

provide nesting grounds for the spectacled eider and millions of other shorebirds and waterfowl, and is working on a plan to develop new wildlife reserves on Alaska's coastal plains. More

When the spectacled eider was first listed as threatened, the best estimate of its global population was only 50,000. With our team's discovery, the species appeared to be in considerably less danger of going extinct than scientists had thought. Still, eider numbers on the Y-K Delta have declined a shocking 96 percent in the past 25 years. The causes appear to be several pressures on the region's breeding birds. Waterfowl harvest on the Y-K Delta is difficult to measure. More

The spectacled eider differs from other eiders in that its feathers extend down to the nostrils on the bill, which is bright orange on males and blue-gray on females. Males have a black chest and pale green head, but are best distinguished by the white patches around their eyes, which are encircled by black feathers to give the appearance of spectacles. Females are brown with black streaks and bars of brown, with light brown patches around the eyes. More

The spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri), one of four species of eider ducks, is a large-bodied sea duck easily recognized by its goggle-like eye patches. The eiders - which include the spectacled, Steller's, king, and common - are marine diving birds of Arctic and northern coasts. There are three distinct breeding populations of spectacled eiders worldwide: in the Yukon-Kuskowim (Y-K) Delta and North Slope regions of Alaska; and along the north coast of Siberia in Russia. More

Spectacled Eiderhome site map Site for sale - serious 'end user' type offers only please. More

The spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri) is a threatened species, found in Alaska, that is undergoing serious population declines. Until recently, little has been know about it's natural history... From the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7, web page: "Most of the world's threatened spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri) fly to northern Russia to breed. More

Order : Anseriformes
Family : Anatidae
Genus : Somateria
Species : fischeri
Authority : (Brandt, 1847)
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