Common Goldeneye

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The Common Goldeneye is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

The Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) is a medium-sized sea duck of the genus Bucephala, the goldeneyes. Their closest relative is the similar Barrow's Goldeneye. Adult males ranges from 45–52 cm (18–21 inches) and from 888 to 1400 grams (1.9 to 3.1 lbs), while females range from 40–50 cm (16–20 inches) and from 500 to 1182 grams (1.1 to 2.6 lbs). The species is aptly named for its golden-yellow eye. More

The black-and-white Common Goldeneye is one of the last ducks to migrate south in fall. It often will winter as far north as open water permits. More

Common Goldeneye, Louis Agassiz Fuertes, Birds of America, 1917 Louis Agassiz Fuertes About twenty inches long. Large black head and black back with iridescent green tinge. The remainder is white. A white patch on each side between the eyes and the bill. Goldeneyes inhabit the northern regions throughout the Northern Hemisphere. The Common Goldeneye nests in the northern U.S. More

breeding season, Common Goldeneyes are frequent winter residents in Puget Sound and on large Washington rivers. The male Common Goldeneye has a dark iridescent-green head that looks black when not in the sun. He also has a prominent round or oval white spot on each side of his face at the base of his black bill. His belly and flanks are white, and his rump is black. His back is mostly white with black bars. The female Common Goldeneye has a gray body, brown head, and yellow eyes. More

The Common Goldeneye has a black head with a greenish tinge. It has a steep forehead and a black bill. Below its yellow eyes is a prominent round white spot. Its breast is white as are its flanks. Black and white streaked feathers are on the side of the black back and rump. The hen has a large brown head with a yellow eye, a white collar and a gray body. More

Description: The common goldeneye, like the Barrow's goldeneye, is named for its brilliant yellow iris. Common goldeneyes fly in small compact clusters, with their wings making a distinctive whistle at every wing beat. Male common goldeneyes have blackish iridescent green heads with a white circular patch between the eye and the base of the bill. The breast, sides, belly and patch across the secondaries and secondary wing coverts are white. The back, rump and upper tail coverts are black and the tail is grayish-brown. More

Common Goldeneye: common nesting migrant, occasional winter resident. Barrow's Goldeneye: rare nesting migrant, rare winter resident. More

Common GoldeneyeCommon goldeneyes get their common name ‘whistler’ from the whistle of their wings that is often heard before they are even seen. Flying fast, in small flocks, no other duck flies as consistently in tight formation. Identification Common goldeneyes are a chunky medium sized diving duck. Males are noticeably larger being about 45-51cm in length and weighing an average of 1000g while hens are 40-50cm in length and weigh in at an average of 800g. More

MaleThe Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) is a medium sized sea duck of the genus Bucephala, the goldeneyes. See also Barrow's Goldeneye. The name fits; this is the most common goldeneye. The Common Goldeneye is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies. Description: Adults have yellow eyes. More

identification of Barrow's and Common Goldeneyes in all plumages. More

Female Common Goldeneyes have chocolate brown heads, a whitish neckband, and speckled gray back and sides. The upper wings are brownish black with the middle five secondaries colored white. The bill is blackish becoming yellow near the tip and the legs and feet are yellowish. Breeding Common Goldeneyes breed across the forested areas of Canada, Minnesota, Michigan, Alaska, and the northeastern United States. More

The common goldeneye is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies. Approximately 188,300 common goldeneyes were killed by duck hunters in North America during the 1970s, representing about 4% of the total number of ducks killed in the region during that period. The rate is probably similar today. Both the breeding and winter habitat of these birds has been degraded by clearance and pollution. More

The common goldeneye is an active, medium-sized diving duck with a rounded head and a bright yellow iris. More

Male common Goldeneyes have blackish iridescent green heads with a white circular patch between the eye and the base of the bill. The breast, sides, belly, and patch across the secondaries and secondary wing coverts are white. The back, rump, and upper tail coverts are black and the tail is grayish brown. The bill is black and the legs and feet are yellowish. Female common Goldeneyes have chocolate brown heads, a whitish neckband, and speckled gray back and sides. More

a sighting of the Common Goldeneye in the Barrie, Ontario, area. This bird is a medium sized diving duck - the male has a black and white head with the noticeable yellow eye and circular white patch, and the female has a brown head. This is a duck of the genus Bucephala. Their closest relative is the similar Barrow's Goldeneye, which is mostly found in the western part of North America. Adults measure around 16 to 21 inches and weigh between 1. More

The Common Goldeneye is one of our smaller sea ducks, only slightly larger than the Hooded Merganser. It is a sexually dimorphic species, in which males and females have distinctly different field marks. Both sexes have rather short necks and round bodies, which creates a “chunky” appearance. Their head is decidedly triangularly shaped, sloping down the front and rear. The neck and body are all white and the back and tail are mostly black. More

The female common goldeneye is a gray duck with a brown head and a white neck. Her mostly black bill has a yellow spot on the end. The male common goldeneye has a white throat and front and a black back and tail. He has a green head with a round white patch on his cheek and his wings are black and white. Voice Females have a rough quack and males have a whistle that sounds like "jip JEEEEV. More

The Common Goldeneye is a diving duck about the size of a Redhead, with a mostly black bill. Males have white flanks reinforced by mostly white folded wings, black upperparts, and a glossy blackish head with a large, round, white spot between the eye and bill. common goldeneye Female - Females have gray flanks and upperparts, a brown head, and a mostly black bill with a yellow tip. More

Common GoldeneyeCommon Goldeneye = Bucephala clangula By Tom Dickson - Ever notice those white-marked buzz-bombs flying in tight formation up and down the Missouri, Yellowstone, and other major rivers all winter? They’re common goldeneyes, hardy mid-sized diving ducks that comprise the end of the annual fall waterfowl migration. Goldeneyes are sure harbingers of winter. More

The adult male common goldeneye in spring plumage is a handsome bird that appears predominantly white while on the water. Head and neck are blackish and highly glossed with metallic green. There is a round white cheek patch between the bright yellow eye and the base of the black bill. Its back and rump are black and the neck, breast, belly and sides are white. Males do not acquire this full breeding plumage until the second year. More

Common Goldeneyes Up Close1436 vuesNeedsmoreritalin * The Lovely Goldeneye Courtship1:45 * Ajouter à la file d'attente Ajoutée à la file d'attente The Lovely Goldeneye Courtship1945 vuesshwaterfowl * Common Goldeneye duck, male - Porron osculado0:38 * Ajouter à la file d'attente Ajoutée à la file d'attente More

The Common Goldeneye is a medium-sized sea-duck native to the lakes and rivers of Canada, the northern United States, Scandinavia and Russia. During winter months, they will migrate to protected coastal waters or open inland water. Nests are built within cavities in trees, which may be created by Woodpeckers or broken limbs. Scotland has fostered a slow-growing population of the Common Goldeneye by building nestboxes throughout the region. They dive for their food, and typically dine on crustaceans, insects and mollusks. More

commongoldeneyeThe common goldeneye is 16-20 inches in length with a wingspan of 30 inches. The male has a white body with a black back. His head looks black, but it is really a glossy green. In breeding season, he has a oval white patch on his face. The female has a brown head and a white neck ring. She has gray wings, head, and tail and a grayish-white breast and belly. More

Common Goldeneye, Common Goldeneye Whistler, Copperhead, Cub-Head, European Goldeneye, Garrot, Goldeneye, Goldeneyed Duck, Great-Head, Iron-Head, Jingler, Merry-Wing, Sizzle-Britches, Spirit Duck, Whiffler, Whistle-Duck, Whistle-Wing, Whistler Common Names in French: Garrot � Oeil D'or, Garrot à úil D'or, Garrot à Oeil D'or, Garrot Sonneur Common Names in German: Schellente Common Names in Hebrew: עבראש ירוק Common Names in Italian: Quattrocchi More

visible, but more often the Common Goldeneye is identified in flight by the high whistling sounds made by its wings. The species name clangula (CLANG-u-la) is a reference to this phenomenon, which also gave rise to its colloquial name, the More

Common goldeneyes breed across the forested areas of Canada, Minnesota, Michigan, Alaska, and the northeastern United States. They are most abundant among lakes of the Canadian boreal forests, especially where lakes or deep marshes have substantial invertebrate populations. They are cavity nesters and have a strong homing tendency, often using the same cavity in successive years. Female common goldeneyes nest in natural tree cavities, abandoned woodpecker holes, or nest-boxes and lay an average of 9 eggs. More

Common Goldeneye - Bucephala clangulaCommon Goldeneyes are by far the more common and numerous goldeneye found in the state, with the Barrow's Goldeneye being only a rare visitor. Hunters often refer to them as "whistlers" due to the tendency of their wings to make a whistling sound in flight. Historical records indicate the species may have once nested in the state, but no confirmed nesting has occurred in decades. More

Picture of Bucephala clangula above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial.
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Anseriformes
Family : Anatidae
Genus : Bucephala
Species : clangula
Authority : (Linnaeus, 1758)
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