Greater White-fronted Goose

The Greater White-fronted Goose is a goose species closely related to the smaller Lesser White-fronted Goose . In Europe it has been known as simply White-fronted Goose; in North America it is known as the Greater White-fronted Goose , and this name is also increasingly adopted internationally. In Northern and Central North America, it is colloquially called Specklebelly due to the salt-and-pepper appearance of the underside.

The Greater White-fronted Goose is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

The Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) is a goose species closely related to the smaller Lesser White-fronted Goose (A. erythropus). In Europe it has been known as simply "White-fronted Goose"; in North America it is known as the Greater White-fronted Goose (or "Greater Whitefront"), and this name is also increasingly adopted internationally. In Northern and Central North America, it is colloquially called "Specklebelly" due to the salt-and-pepper appearance of the underside. More

in Greenland, the Greater White-fronted Goose has one of the largest ranges of any species of goose in the world. In North America, however, it is common only west of the Mississippi River, where it is found in large flocks in wetlands and croplands. More

The Greater White-fronted Goose has a large range, estimated globally at 1,000,000 to 10,000,000 square kilometers. Native to Europe, Asia, and North America, the bird prefers grassland, wetlands, and marine ecosystems, though it has been known to reside on arable or pasture land. The population of this bird is estimated to be about 2,900,000 to 3,300,000 individuals across the globe. More

The Greater White-fronted Goose is divided into five subspecies. The nominate subspecies A. a. albifrons breeds in the far north of Europe and Asia, and winters further south and west in Europe. In the far east of Siberia east to arctic Canada, it is replaced by A. a. frontalis, slightly larger and with a marginally longer bill, wintering in the United States and Japan. Two other restricted-range races occur slightly further south in northern North America; A. a. More

* Greater White-fronted Goose videos, photos & sounds on the Internet Bird Collection v • d • e Game animals and shooting in the United Kingdom Game birds Common Pheasant · Grey Partridge · Red-legged Partridge · Red Grouse · Ptarmigan · Black Grouse1 · Eurasian Woodcock · Snipe Common Pheasant Quarry species Mallard · Teal · Wood Pigeon · Golden Plover · Canada Goose · Greylag Goose · Pink-footed Goose · More

North American RangeThe Greater White-fronted Goose is mottled brownish-gray overall with a black tail, white rump, white band at the tip of the tail, and bright orange legs. The belly has a varied pattern of large black splotches. Its name is derived from the white facial feathers around the base of the pinkish-yellow bill. The juvenile looks similar but lacks the white facial feathering and black markings on the belly. More

Bent Life History for the Greater White-fronted Goose - the common name and sub-species reflect the nomenclature in use at the time the description was written. WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE ANSER ALBIFRONS ALBIFRONS (Scopoli) HABITS Two forms of the white-fronted goose have long stood on our Check List unchallenged: a smaller European form (albifrons) and a larger American form (gambelli). More

* Greater White-fronted Goose videos, photos & sounds on the Internet Bird Collection Copyright: Wikipedia. This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from Wikipedia.org - Diet / Feeding: Ducks and geese generally feed on larvae and pupae usually found under rocks, aquatic animals, plant material, seeds, small fish, snails and crabs. Feeding Ducks and Geese ... More

Distribution of the Greater White-fronted Goose in North America. With a nearly circumpolar arctic distribution, the Greater White-fronted Goose has the broadest range of any species in its genus and is the only New World representative of the five species of gray geese from the Old World. More

Greater White-fronted Goose - Adult (1 of 3) at Peace Valley Park, Bucks County, PA - 24 December 2005. Take note of the width of the flank stripe, terminal tail band, and white front. All three of these should be more extensive in a non-flavirostris subspecies. Greater White-fronted Goose - Two adults at Peace Valley Park, Bucks County, PA - 24 December 2005. More

The Greater White-fronted Goose is in the genus Anser, which is the Latin word for goose, while the species-name albifrons refers to the bird’s white forehead or front of face. Description: The Greater White-fronted Goose is a common medium-sized goose (length ~20 in.; wingspan ~60 inches). More

The Greenland Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser frontalis flavirostris) is known to be a rare visitor to northeastern North America, but I have never been satisfied with a reliable, objective way of distinguishing it from the North American subspecies of Greater White-fronted Goose, also a rare visitor to the northeast. More

TN11021 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE ANSER ALBIFRONS FLAVIROSTRIS Tennessee Animal Biogeographic System TABS = version 12/2002 Taxonomy Status Distribution Habitat Associations Food Habits Environmental Associations Life History Management Practices References Taxonomy - Species ID TN11021 Name GOOSE, GREATER More

The Greater White-fronted Goose is mottled brownish-gray overall with a black tail, white rump, white band at the tip of the tail, and bright orange legs. Anser albifrons Order: Anseriformes Family: Anatidae Status: Fairly common migrant. Uncommon in winter. More

Greater White-fronted Goose - East Allen Township, Northampton County; April 25, 2007. Photos by Dustin Welch. Although still a rarity, this goose is becoming more 'expected' in the state, particularly from late Fall through early Spring. More photos of this bird can be found on Dustin Welch's 'Flickr' site. More

The Greater White-fronted Goose is a common spring migrant in South Dakota, and can also be found during the fall migration. They have adapted well to a human presence and now rely heavily on waste grain and other agricultural by-products on their wintering grounds. Habitat: Breeds on both wet coastal areas and drier inland areas on the Arctic tundra. More

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE off in the distance. We drove to a better vantage point where I snapped a few shots before moving on. Passing the "Fishing Pond" again, it was gull-less as before. We head out to Lee Kay Ponds which was still barren. Along 7200 west we encountered flock of 15-20 American Goldfinches and a Bald Eagle which may have been the same one from the ponds earlier). More

Order : Anseriformes
Family : Anatidae
Genus : Anser
Species : albifrons
Authority : (Scopoli, 1769)
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