Eastern Curlew

The Far Eastern Curlew spends its breeding season in northeastern Asia, including Siberia to Kamchatka, and Mongolia. Its breeding habitat is composed of marshy and swampy wetlands and lakeshores. Most individuals winter in coastal Australia, with a few heading to South Korea, Thailand, and New Zealand, where they stay at estuaries, beaches, and salt marshes. During its migration the Far Eastern Curlew commonly passes the Yellow Sea.

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The Eastern Curlew is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

The Eastern Curlew (Numenius madagascariensis) is the largest wader in the world and migrates between the Northern and Southern Hemisphere summers. It spends about half of the year in Australia whilst feeding and the remainder of the year migrating to and from breeding areas in northern mainland Asia. The Eastern Curlew has long, grey legs and a very long, black, downward curved bill. More

Eastern Curlew, distribution map for south-west Victoria. Source; Victorian Fauna database. The item described on this page is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 licence. You are free to copy, distribute, and display the work under the following conditions: you must give the original author credit, you may not use this work for commercial purposes, you may not alter, transform, or build upon this work. More

Eastern Curlews have very long legs, allowing them to wade in boggy areas and moorland in their breeding region, where other shorter-legged waders are unable to go. More

Eastern Curlew Numenius madagascariensis More

* Far Eastern Curlew Numenius madagascariensis * Little Curlew Numenius minutus * Eskimo Curlew Numenius borealis - critically endangered, possibly extinct (early 2000s?) * Bristle-thighed Curlew Numenius tahitiensis The Late Eocene (Montmartre Formation, some 35 mya) fossil Limosa gypsorum of France was originally placed in Numenius and may in fact belong there (Olson, 1985). More

The Far Eastern Curlew spends its breeding season in northeastern Asia, including Siberia to Kamchatka, and Mongolia. Its breeding habitat is composed of marshy and swampy wetlands and lakeshores. Most individuals winter in coastal Australia, with a few heading to South Korea, Thailand, and New Zealand, where they stay at estuaries, beaches, and salt marshes. During its migration the Far Eastern Curlew commonly passes the Yellow Sea. It uses its long, decurved bill to probe for invertebrates in the mud. More

The Far Eastern Curlew is a freshwater bird species that is evaluated currently as Least Concern. This bird species is known to primarily breed in eastern portions of Russia. Visits to portions of Asia have been noted. The range of this bird is around 10 million square kilometers. There are possible future threats regarding habitat loss as well as hunting and even food loss as a result of pollution. More

In the South of Tasmania, Eastern Curlew are found during the Summer months, in the Orielton Lagoon, Barilla Bay, Sorell and Five Mile Beach areas. (In the North, the Tamar River in the vicinity of Georgetown is a good spot for both species). Presently there's a flock of around 70 or 80 birds, frequenting the southern areas I've mentioned . A few may overwinter. Whimbrels are a lot thinner on the ground, but occasionally consort with the curlews, notably in Orielton Lagoon. More

Far Eastern Curlew has significantly longer bill, more richly colored orange underparts, and heavily marked wing linings. Flight Pattern Has relatively slow wingbeats reminescent of a gull, wings quivered in shallow gliding courtship flight. Eurasian Curlew Body Illustration‚óŹ Range & Habitat: Eurasian Curlew: Breeds in wet fields, forest edges, and marshes across Europe and northern Asia. Winters on marine mudflats along all the coasts of Europe, Africa, and Asia. More

"It's impossible to ignore the Eastern Curlews' arrival in our place. The sounds of their voices filling all the country-side. The main question which disquiets the waders as soon as they reach the Russian lands is to leave good descendants after them. The waders have little time at our breeding site to make their nests and incubate the eggs. They can't wait for the chicks to develop fully but must leave them to grow up alone whilst the adults commence their southern migration. More

The Eastern Curlew is the largest migratory wading bird in the world. With its long legs it stands head and shoulders above other waders and so is easily distinguished on the wetlands along the Flyway. It also has a very distinctive long, curved beak up to 18 cm in length. This is equivalent to 5 times the length of its head and allows it to feed on worms and small crabs that live buried deep in the wet sand or mudflats. More

The eastern curlew is the largest species (24 in., or 60 cm, long); the common, or Eurasian, curlew, almost as large, is the largest European shorebird. The Eskimo curlew is now virtually extinct. For more information on curlew, visit Britannica.com. More

Far Eastern Curlew - Summary of Flag Sightings Information sent by the Australasian Waders Study Group - Numbers of Far Eastern Curlew banded and flagged in Australia and retrapped / recovered / subsequently sighted in Australia and overseas Capture Location Flag Sightings Newly Banded Retrapped Recovered Total Flagged Overseas Australia VIC More

Aspects of the topic eastern curlew are discussed in the following places at Britannica. Assorted References * description (in curlew (bird)) The eastern curlew (N. madagascariensis), the largest bird in the family, 60 cm (24 inches) long, and the slender-billed curlew (N. tenuirostris) are both Old World birds. More

A left view of an Eastern curlew standing in very shallow water. Scientific name: Numenius madagascariensis Conservation status: The eastern curlew is listed as 'Rare' under the Queensland Nature Conservation Act 1992. Nationally they are a 'Listed Migratory Species' (Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 Listing Status) in appendices to the Bonn Convention, and in JAMBA (Japan/Australia Migratory Bird Agreement) and CAMBA (China/Australia Migratory Bird Agreement). More

This Eastern curlew, however, was at the end of the road where I stopped at the loo. Report to moderator Logged - Odille "Can't keep my eyes from the circling skies" - Visit my Blog! @ http://odillesphotos.wordpress.com/ Galleries - http://www.photographybyodille.com ~ http://odille.zenfolio. More

The Eastern Curlew breeds in Siberia and flies along the East Asian Australasian Flyway to inter-tidal wetlands and occasionally as far south as Aotearoa, New Zealand. There are at least another 35 species of birds which regularly migrate along this same flyway, many travelling from beyond the Arctic circle. The Eastern Curlew is the largest of the migratory wading birds. More

The Eastern Curlew is the largest wader in the world and migrates between the Northern and Southern Hemisphere summers. In New Zealand, they are an annual migrant in small numbers. In the 1980s and 90s, 20-50 birds visited New Zealand each year, whereas 6000 visited Australia. Numbers have declined in Australia and New Zealand since the 1960s. With its long legs it stands head and shoulders above other waders and so is easily distinguished. More

The Far Eastern Curlew Satellite Project was initiated after discussions held at the 8th Conference of the Japan-Australia Migratory Bird Protection Agreement held in Queensland, Australia, in 1995. More

The Far Eastern Curlew or Eastern Curlew Numenius madagascariensis is a large shorebird most similar in appearance to the Long-billed Curlew, but slightly larger. It is mostly brown in color, differentiated from other curlews by its plain, unpatterned brown underwing. It has the longest bill of any shorebird and is probably the world's largest sandpiper, at 63 cm (25 in), although the Eurasian Curlew is of roughly similar dimensions. http://en.wikipedia. More

* Eastern Curlew, Numenius madagascariensis * Long-billed Curlew, Numenius americanus * Bartramia * Upland Sandpiper, Bartramia longicauda Note that the stone-curlews are not true curlews (family Scolopacidae) but members of the family Burhinidae, which is in the same order Charadriiformes, but only distantly related within it. More

Order : Charadriiformes
Family : Scolopacidae
Genus : Numenius
Species : madagascariensis
Authority : (Linnaeus, 1766)