Yellow-bellied marmot

Yellow-bellied marmot

Order : Rodentia
Suborder : Sciurognathi
Family : Sciuridae
Subfamily : Sciurinae
Species : Marmota flaviventris

 

Keywords: yellow

The Yellow-bellied marmot is listed as Least Concern (LR/lc), lowest risk. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category, on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

Countries
Canada and United States
Some facts about the
Yellow-bellied marmot

Adult weight : 3.5 kg (7.7 lbs)

Maximum longevity : 21 years

Female maturity :730 days

Male maturity : 730 days

Gestation : 30 days

Weaning : 33 days

Litter size : 4

Litters per year : 1

Interval between litters : 458 days

Weight at birth : 0.034 kg (0.0748 lbs)

Weight at weaning : 0.479 kg (1.0538 lbs)

Basal metabolic rate : 9 W

Body mass : 4.295 kg (9.449 lbs)

Temperature : 36.85 °C (98.33 °F)

Source: AnAge, licensed under CC

Facts about the yellow-bellied marmot

A Yellow Bellied Marmot is seen on a spring morning near Jones Hole and Green River in Dinosaur National Monument between Dinosaur, Colorado and Vernal, Utah.

          Marmota flaviventris is yellow-brown in color with yellow or orange russet bellies.

Burt, Grossenheider 92) Yellow-bellied marmots are found sitting on boulders .

Closely related to the eastern United States' groundhog or woodchuck, the yellow-bellied marmot is common in rocky areas up to about 12,000 feet.

Description of Species: Yellow-bellied marmots are rodents rather similar to squirrels, only bigger.

Interesting Facts:Yellow-bellied marmots are only found west of the Great Plains.

The rockchuck or yellow bellied marmot, Marmota flaviventris, is found throughout the western United States and can be found in a variety of environments from desert to mountain.

The yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris ) is a heavy-bodied marmot.

The yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) is a highly social member of the ground squirrel family.

The yellow-bellied marmot is a heavy-set, brown to grizzled animal with white areas on the chin and (as the name suggests) a yellowish belly.

The yellow-bellied marmot is also much more gregarious than the woodchuck, preferring to remain in colonies rather than live a solitary life.

The Yellow-bellied Marmot is very closely related to the groundhog that is common in the eastern United States.

Yellow Bellied Marmot is a 'pest' (an unwanted organism) that can be controlled through the use of pesticides.

Yellow-bellied marmots are generalist herbivores.

Yellow-bellied marmots are the best studied marmot species.

The yellow-bellied marmot, Marmota flaviventris, is a large (five to ten pound) rodent that occurs throughout much of the western United States and in parts of southwestern Canada. (Full text)

The yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) is a favorite animal to many alpine visitors. (Full text)

robertwgross12-30-2004, 07:15 PMYellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) is a member of the squirrel family that lives high in the mountains and seldom poses for photographers. (Full text)

Yellow-bellied marmots are rodents rather similar to squirrels, only bigger. (Full text)

The Yellow-bellied Marmot is from the order Rodentia. (Full text)

Yellow-bellied marmots are among the largest rodents, and they also have one of the longer periods of hiberation, something like 6 months. (Full text)

Yellow-bellied marmots are the best studied marmot species. (Full text)

and Ammospermophilus leucurus) are controlled for collection, importation and possession; (xxx) Red squirrel or chickaree, except for nuisance animals, which are noncontrolled for collection, Sciuridae Family (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) are controlled for collection, importation and possesion; (xxxi) Yellow-bellied marmot, Sciuridae Family, (Marmota flaviventris) is controlled for collection, importation and possesion; (Full text)

The yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) is one of them. (Full text)

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