California mouse

California mouse

Order : Rodentia
Suborder : Sciurognathi
Family : Muridae
Subfamily : Sigmodontinae
Species : Peromyscus californicus

 

The California mouse is listed as Least Concern (LR/lc), lowest risk. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category, on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

Namings for the California mouse
A young / baby of a California mouse is called a 'pinkie, kitten or pup'. The females are called 'doe' and males 'buck'. A California mouse group is called a 'nest, colony, harvest, horde or mischief'.
Countries
Mexico and United States
Some facts about the
California mouse

Adult weight : 0.042 kg (0.0924 lbs)

Maximum longevity : 6 years

Female maturity :46 days

Gestation : 30 days

Weaning : 30 days

Litter size : 2

Litters per year : 5

Interval between litters : 24 days

Weight at birth : 0.004 kg (0.0088 lbs)

Weight at weaning : 0.019 kg (0.0418 lbs)

Body mass : 0.047 kg (0.1034 lbs)

Temperature : 36.85 °C (98.33 °F)

Source: AnAge, licensed under CC

Facts about the California mouse

85, The American Society of Mammalogists GENERAL STATEMENT Peromyscus californicus is the largest species of the genus in the United States. (Full text)

California Mouse Peromyscus californicus is the largest species in its genus.

80(5): 926-933 (2002) Full text (PDF 74 kb) Abstract: The California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) is a monogamous species with biparental care. (Full text)

The California Mouse is from the order Rodentia. (Full text)

The high prevalence of infection (50%) in California mice at El Cariso #2 and isolation of BCNV from California mice captured at the Bear Canyon Trailhead and El Cariso #1 indicate that the California mouse is the principal host of BCNV. (Full text)

California mouse is much larger, with head+body 3 3/4 to 5 in long (10-13 cm), and is yellow/brown to gray mixed with black above; tail is not strongly bicolored.

California Mouse is larger. (Full text)

The California mouse is not an efficient water conserver compared to other rodents in its habitat (MacMillen 1964).

The California mouse is often found inhabiting the abandoned dens of Neotoma. (Full text)

The California mouse is not known to enter houses or other human structures and its occurrence around people should be considered rare.

The California mouse is not known to enter houses or other human structures and its occurrence around people should be . (Full text)

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