Lorises

Lorises

Order : Primates
Family : Loridae

 

Animals in the family Loridae

Calabar angwantibo
Slender loris
Slow loris
Pygmy slow loris
Potto
Facts about the family Loridae, the lorises

The Loridae is the family containing the lorises, and pottos, which are grouped into genera as follows: ORDER PRIMATES (Full text)

The Loridae is the family containing the lorises, and pottos, which are grouped into genera as follows:

The Loridae is the family containing the lorises, and pottos, which are grouped into genera as follows:Classification ORDER primates|PRIMATES *Suborder Strepsirhini: non-tarsier prosimians **Family Lemuridae: lemurs **Family Megaladapidae: sportive lemurs (Full text)

The Loridae is the family containing the lorises, and pottos, which are grouped into genera as follows: [edit]Classification (Full text)

Nycticebus The Loridae is the family containing the lorises, and pottos, which are grouped into genera as follows:

Information which is only provided for veterinarians and zoo or rescue station personnel with the necessary skills (but maybe not familiar with lorises) is listed separately as far as possible (see headlines). (Full text)

, in preparation: Fast food for slow lorises: is low metabolism related to secondary compounds in high-energy plant diet? (Full text)

  The “slower” movement of lorises is probably a physiological adaptation, necessary to digest the toxins found in their preferred food items (Rasmussen and Nekaris 1998).

The most striking primate example is the record for Malagasy lemurs, currently limited to subfossils a few thousand years old although they must have existed at the very least for 20 My, as the sister-group (lorises) is documented by fossils of that age. (Full text)

One important factor contributing to the sharing of space between slow lorises is probably that chances of successful dispersal are low. (Full text)

Locomotion in lorises is a slow, cautious climbing form of quadrupedalism, and flexible hip joints permit suspension by hind limbs while the hands are used in feeding.

• I'm not sure if this picture of two infant pygmy lorises is adorable or disturbing. (Full text)

The third possibility, with tarsiers as sister taxa to lemurs and lorises, is shown for completeness only (right diagram) as it does not have much support, even though lorises and tarsiers share some "frog-like" anatomical modifications of their hindlimbs to support their tremendous leaps from tree to tree. (Full text)

The fossil record for lorises is very poor commencing in the early Miocene (18-20mya) with a modern looking form-Mioeuoticus.

Bushbabies, which range from the size of chipmunks to opossums, are nocturnal leaping animals that now live in sub-Saharan Africa, while lorises are more gangly and slow-moving and are found in the forests of central Africa and south Asia. (Full text)

Slow lorises are primates (like humans and monkeys) and look something like the related lemurs.

Diet of loris and potto species Slender lorises In the wild, according to analysis of feces and stomach contents, slender lorises are extremely insectivorous, eating mainly very small arthropods (Full text)

Lorises are slow-moving prosimians of Asia.

Slow Loris Lorises are often mistaken for sloths but actually lorises and

Lorises are diurnal and arboreal. (Full text)

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