Monk seals

Monk seals

Order : Carnivora
Family : Phocidae
Genus : Monachus

 

Animals in the genus Monachus

Mediterranean monk seal
Hawaiian monk seal
West Indian monk seal
Facts about the genus Monachus, the monk seals

Monachus is a genus (and a subgenus of the same name) of the Family Phocidae and the Order Pinnipedia and refers to the various monk seal species throughout the world.

MonachusMonachus is a genus (and a subgenus of the same name) of the Family Phocidae and the Order Pinnipedia and refers to the various monk seal species throughout the world.

‘The Mediterranean monk seal Monachus monachus is one of three related species of warm water seals.

Introduction The Mediterranean monk seal Monachus monachus is an indicator species residing at the top of the food chain in the Mediterranean marine ecosystem. (Full text)

Acting swiftly to reinforce protection for the seal, the local harbour master delivered an alert to the surrounding area, reminding inhabitants that Monachus monachus is a strictly-protected species under Italian law. (Full text)

Description & Fascinating FactsThe Mediterranean monk seal, Monachus monachus, is nearly extinct and is not only the most endangered pinniped species, but it is also one of the rarest animals in the world.

ma The Mediterranean monk seal Monachus monachus is known from the Black Sea, the Mediterranean, and the northwest coast of Africa as far south as Gambia.

(Hermann, 1779) The Mediterranean Monk Seal (Monachus monachus) is believed to be the world's rarest pinniped. (Wiki)

For example, the entire world population of endangered Hawaiian monk seals is found in this region, with areas designated as critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act. (Full text)

One of the best ways that people can help protect the health and welfare of Hawaiian monk seals is to observe the animals at a respectful distance of at least 50 yards and to refrain from swimming with or feeding them. (Full text)

The population of the Hawaiian monk seals is similar to their cousins the Mediterranean monk seals with beach counts of about 500 seals in recent years.

Although the relative importance of different prey items in the diet of Hawaiian monk seals is not yet certain, preliminary results presented at a meeting in December 1999 revealed that lobsters may constitute a significant percentage of the diet of most juvenile and adult female monk seals at French Frigate Shoals.

Monk seals make movies with the ‘critter cam’ One of the major problems biologists face in protecting our critically endangered Hawaiian monk seals is lack of knowledge. (Full text)

The deliberate killing of monk seals is identified as the main factor in the decline of their population over the last decades.

The number of Hawaiian monk seals is dropping so low, so quickly, there's a good chance we may soon lose them forever. (Full text)

The total population of remaining Hawaiian Monk Seals is approximately 1,300. (Full text)

The dorsal side (top side) of adult Hawaiian monk seals is usually dark grey or brown. (Full text)

Monk seals are unique because they are the only seals to inhabit subtropical waters throughout their entire lifespans.

Hawaiian monk seals are both endemic and endangered

Physical Description: Monk seals are brownish when mature.

Mediterranean Monk Seals are slightly shorter, but are heavier at approximately 660 pounds.

The monk seals are found in the Mediterranean Sea and Hawaii.

1 Mb) Monk seals are the most primitive living pinnipeds (seals, walruses, and sea lions) in the world. (Full text)

Monk seals are masters of energy conservation; they sleep on the beach during much of the day.

Monk seals are thought to forage in nearshore waters for fish and octopus.

Monk seals are nocturnal feeders with a very diverse diet including eels, octopus, lobsters and fish.

Hawaiian monk seals are extremely sensitive to human activity. (Full text)

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