Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater

The honeyeater is mainly frugivorous, but will also eat nectar, blossoms, insects, reptiles, and young birds.

Picture of the Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater has been licensed under a GFDL
Original source: Own work
Author: Kevin
Permission: GNU Free Documentation License

The Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

The Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater is one of the frugivorous (fruit-eating) honeyeaters, often following seasonal fruiting patterns; however, it also eats nectar, insects and small vertebrates. Facts and figures Research Species: No Minimum size: 23 cm Maximum size: 26 cm Average size: 24 cm Average weight: 52 g Breeding season: June to January; can breed year round. More

A Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater (Acanthagenys rufogularis) that I photographed in the Binya State Forest. EXIF: Canon EOS 30D : 1/250 sec : f/5.6 : 400 mm : ISO 100 Sorry for my lack of photo posts over the last few days - I was away at the 2007 Australian Birdfair in Leeton, NSW. Categories: Photoblogs.org - The Photoblogging Resource View My Profile coolphotoblogs. More

Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater Acanthagenys rufogularis ^ More

Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater taken at Gluepot Reserve, South Australia Conservation status Least Concern (IUCN 3.1) Scientific classification Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves Order: Passeriformes Family: Meliphagidae Genus: Acanthagenys Gould, 1838 Species: A. More

We've also encountered Spiny-cheeked Honeyeaters in the sandy semi-arid scrubland of the Pilliga Forests of Northwest New South Wales, as well as residential areas of northwestern NSW towns. According to my reference books, the Spiny-cheek is found in all Australian states except Tasmania, but avoiding the tropical north, the far south-western corner of Western Australia, and the far south of the east coast. A parent stuffs a grasshopperinto the gaping mouth of one of the two hatchlings . . . . . More

Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater ( Acanthagenys rufogularis ) Spiny-cheeked Honeyeaters Photo by Geoffrey Dabb Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater Photo by Geoffrey Dabb Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater Photo by David Cook Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater Photo by Peter Cowper Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater Photo by Peter Cowper Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater Photo by Geoffrey Dabb Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater Photo by Julian Robinson - More

Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater • Acanthagenys rufogularis Quite a common bird throughout Australia, except for the far north, southern tip of Western Australia and Tasmania. Quite common in the arid interior. This is a nomadic bird, although they can be seen in pairs or small flocks. Found in arid woodlands habitat, mulga, mallee, saltbush, tea-tree, and regions with spinifex groundcover. Also found in the drier parts of coastal regions with scrubby vegetation cover. Feeds on insects, nectar and small native fruits. More

Spiny-Cheeked Honeyeaters, often seen in small flocks, are among the most beautiful of the larger honeyeaters and are distributed over much of the arid woodlands. Soaring suddenly upwards and descending onto a branch with tail spread, they give out a pleasant gurgling or clear trilling call. Nectar, berries and insects are their main diet which they hunt for in pairs or in small flocks. They are often seen performing acrobatic feats around flowering shrubs like the Emu Bush (Eremophila ssp. More

Title: SPINY-CHEEKED HONEYEATER Acanthagenys rufogularis Added by: Andy T (Click to view profile.) Date: 29th May 09 Channel: Birds * Tags: Spiney faced honeyeater Alice Springs Australia. More

The Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater is a grey-brown bird with a burnt orange throat and chest. It has grey wings edged with white, and a long tail with white tips. It has a pink, black-tipped bill Accommodation Online Hotel Club Hotels Combined Hotels. More

Spiny-cheeked Honeyeaters have a number of funny calls that cannot be mistaken. They visited us quite often south of Narrabri, mostly when our Bottlebrush tree was blossoming. They like the flowers of Grevillea bushes as well. More

A Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater feeds at flowers of a tall slender grevillea shrub native to Australia's semi-desert country. Although the surrounding country for hundreds of kilometres was in drought, a great number of birds, of many species, were present, attracted by the nectar and insects. In addition to this species were White-fronted Honeyeater, New Holland Honeyeater, Tawny-crowned Honeyeater, and Red Wattlebird. Reference: The mm Field Guide to Australian Birds Pages 248, 249, 392. More

Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater ( Acanthagenys rufogularis ) = Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater | Acanthagenys rufogularis photo Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater Image by Julian Robinson - Some rights reserved. Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater | Acanthagenys rufogularis photo Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater taken at Gluepot Reserve, South Australia Image by Kevin - Some rights reserved. Amazon. More

Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater, as shown in the photos on this post. This species has been rather quiet lately. Just before I managed to race for the camera and get these shots the adult bird was feeding a young one. They must have been keeping their presence quiet while they were nesting. This species is found throughout much of mainland Australia but not in Tasmania. It is also absent from the tropical north, coastal south east and far south west of the continent. More

* Spiny-cheeked Honeyeaters at Round Hill * Early morning on Bennets Gorge Track * Superb Lyrebird more Words about birds - * Diary of a Magpie Lark nest * Royal Park * Other Bird Words Audio » Browse by » title Audio by title spiny-cheeked_honeyeater_nr_example = More

Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater - Acanthagenys rufogularis Photograph Copyright More

The Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater (Acanthagenys rufogalaris) is the only species in the genus Acanthegenys. It is large, for a honeyeater, ranging from 22 to 27 centimeters and weighing around 52 grams . The birds are sociable, aggressive, and often observed foraginging in large flocks . The honeyeater is mainly frugivorous, but will also eat nectar, blossoms, insects, reptiles, and baby birds. Its habitat includes deserts, coastal scrubland, and dry woodlands . It can also be found in mangroves and orchards . More

Picture of Acanthagenys rufogularis above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial.
Original source: Michael Jefferies
-Michael Jefferies -Author: Michael Jefferies
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Passeriformes
Family : Meliphagidae
Genus : Acanthagenys
Species : rufogularis
Authority : Gould, 1838
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