Limpkin

The Limpkin is placed in its own monotypic family, Aramidae, which is in turn placed with the crane and rail order Gruiformes. It had been suggested that the Limpkin was close to the ibis and spoonbill family Threskiornithidae, based upon shared bird lice. The Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy of birds, based upon DNA-DNA hybridization, suggested that the Limpkin's closest relatives were the Heliornithidae finfoots, and Sibley and Monroe even placed the species in that family in 1990.

Picture of the Limpkin has been licensed under a GFDL
Original source: Own work
Author: DickDaniels (http://carolinabirds.org/)
Permission: GNU Free Documentation License

The Limpkin is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

The Limpkin is placed in its own monotypic family, Aramidae, which is in turn placed with the crane and rail order Gruiformes. It had been suggested that the Limpkin was close to the ibis and spoonbill family Threskiornithidae, based upon shared bird lice. The Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy of birds, based upon DNA-DNA hybridization, suggested that the Limpkin's closest relatives were the Heliornithidae finfoots, and Sibley and Monroe even placed the species in that family in 1990. More

Limpkins roost in trees and nest in marsh grass or low bushes. They lay four to eight eggs per clutch with both male and female incubating the young. They are noisy birds; their sad call gives them the name "crying bird." Because limpkins were considered good food birds, they were almost wiped out in Florida and Georgia. Today, they are protected and are regaining their former abundance. Limpkins are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Gruiformes, family Aramidae. More

limpkinlimpkin - wading bird of Florida, Cuba and Jamaica having a drooping bill and a distinctive wailing callAramus pictuswader, wading bird - any of many long-legged birds that wade in water in search of foodGruiformes, order Gruiformes - inland marsh-dwelling birds with long legs and necks and bills that wade in water in search of food: cranes; rails; bustards How to thank TFD for its existence? Tell a friend about us, add a link to this page, More

Limpkin: Resident locally in southern Georgia and Florida; also found in the American tropics. Preferred habitats include wooded and brushy swamps and marshes. Listen to Call Voice Text "kkrrrraaow" Interesting Facts * The Limpkin is named for its limping-like flight with its dangling legs and jerky wing beats. More

Great timing! Limpkins are so beautiful - you can hardly go wrong! Posted 3 months ago. ( permalink ) view profile paula.nadine says: Another beauty! Wonderful capture!! Posted 3 months ago. ( permalink ) view profile natalija2006 Pro User says: Wonderful capture! Seen in the group, All birds all the time www.flickr.com/groups/Allbirdsallthetime Posted 3 months ago. More

limpkin or courlan (koor'lun) , common terms for a long-legged, nonmigratory marsh bird, considered the connecting evolutionary link between the crane and the rail. They have a cranelike skeletal structure, but their digestive system, as well as their nesting habits and behavior, is raillike. There is only one species, Aramus quarauna, which is divided into 5 subspecies, some found exclusively in South America and the others found from South Carolina and Florida to Argentina. Limpkins are large (28 in. More

* limpkin at HighBeam ResearchPremium information, facts, and biographies * limpkin on Wikipedia Fetching requested content. Please wait... Loading... More

This Limpkin is just one example of over 900 WhatBird.com illustrations available for licensing. All illustrations are hand drawn and provided in Photoshop 300 dpi, layered, 2400 x 3000 pixels, 24 bit color format. See below for available formats for this product. For custom or non standard uses of our of our illustrations go to this link and fill out the form at this link: http://www.whatbird.com/illustrationlicensing/ A representative will contact you within 48 hours. More

Limpkin: Makes a loud, rolling wail "kkrrrraaow", mainly at night. Similar Species Limpkin: Yellow-crowned and Black-crowned Night-Herons have much shorter legs and necks, and shorter, thicker, straight bills. . Home | Search | Browser | Expert | Forum | Store | My Whatbird | Help | Site Map © 2002 - 2007 www.whatbird.com All rights reserved. No part of this web site may be reproduced without written permission from Mitch Waite Group. More

Limpkins feed mainly on Apple snails, which they find in shallow water and on floating vegetation. Favorite feeding spots are frequently marked with piles of empty snail shells. If you look closely, you will see that the limpkins large, strong bill curves to the right and has a gap near the tip. The upper tip of the bill is knife-sharp, and the bird uses its bill like a paring knife to cut the attaching muscle of the Apple snails. More

Limpkin Range MapView dynamic map of eBird sightings Field MarksHelp - * AdultPopOutZoom In Adult * © William L. Newton / CLO Similar Species - * Immature White Ibis has a white belly and pinkish legs. * Glossy Ibis darker and with no white spots. More

limpkin pronunciation /ˈlɪmp kɪn/ Show Spelled Show IPA –nouna large, loud-voiced, wading bird, Aramus guarauna, intermediate in size and character between the cranes and the rails, of the warmer regions of America. Use limpkin in a SentenceSee images of limpkinSearch limpkin on the Web - Origin: 1870–75, Americanism; limp1 + -kin; so called because of its jerky walk Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2010. More

LimpkinThe limpkin is 23-28 inches in length with a wingspan of about 42 inches. It has long legs and a long neck. It has brown and gray feathers with white spots and streaks. Its long, pointed bill is slightly curved and is yellow with a black tip. Range The limpkin is found in southern Georgia and most of Florida. It is also found in the American tropics. More

The Limpkin (common names: carrao, courlan, crying bird), Aramus guarauna, is a bird that looks like a large rail, but is skeletally closer to the cranes. More

Conservation Limpkin had been hunted almost to extinction in Florida by the beginning of the 20th century; with legal protection, has made a fair comeback. Probably declining in parts of tropical range. Back to Top Copyright More

Mostly solitary, Limpkins may be overlooked as they stalk about in marshes and swamps, but they certainly draw attention with their piercing banshee wails, often heard at dawn or at night. Its cry is a piercing, repeated wail, kree-ow, kra-ow, etc., etc., especially at night and on cloudy days. A large spotted swamp wader, it stands about 28 inches tall. The Limpkin is found in open freshwater marshes, along the shores of ponds and lakes, and in wooded swamps along rivers and near springs. More

The Limpkin (left and below) is a strange marsh bird of the New World tropics. It looks superficially like an ibis, has the general anatomy of a crane, and shares many behavioral traits with rails. Recent DNA evidence places it close to the sungrebes & finfoots (Sibley & Ahlquist 1990). More

vues redshouldervids — 1 août 2008 — A very obliging limpkin videod in John Prince Park, Lake Worth, Florida. It took very little notice of us as it... redshouldervids — 1 août 2008 — A very obliging limpkin videod in John Prince Park, Lake Worth, Florida. It took very little notice of us as it fed on what I guess were snails. More

The Limpkin occurs in wooded swamps and brushy areas in the southeastern U. S., Caribbean islands, and from Mexico to Argentina. It is medium-sized (58-71 cm, 850-1050 grams), with a long neck, long legs, and brownish-olive plumage with white streaks. The long bill is slightly decurved. The tail is short and the wings are broad and rounded. Food is almost entirely large snails, mainly of the genus Pomacea, obtained in shallow water. More

* Limpkin (Aramus guarauna) Limpkin (Aramus guarauna) * Body plans of some larger gruiforms. Body plans of some larger gruiforms. More

, the Limpkin has long legs, a long neck, and a long bill. Limpkins are very capable runners, and they also swim and fly well. Male Limpkins on territories often challenge each other over territorial boundaries. Female Limpkins are more prone to wandering off territory than males, which tend to be quite sedentary. Occasionally falling prey to alligators, Limpkins have an alarm call they produce when an alligator is nearby. More

the Rails, Limpkin, and Cranes group icon Rails, Limpkin, and Cranes = Group Pool Discussion 190 Members Map Join This Group Guest Passes let you share your photos that aren't public. Anyone can see your public photos anytime, whether they're a Flickr member or not. But! If you want to share photos marked as friends, family or private, use a Guest Pass. More

The Limpkin is an awkward flyer, especially during landings. Voice: Sings mostly at dusk and after dark, a very distinctive kerrr-ooww... like a child or a woman screaming. Florida pioneers mistook the call of the Limpkin for the haunting wails of tortured souls in the nighttime swamps. Audio is available at eNature.com. Limpkin 1 Feeding: Chief diet is the Apple Snail. The Limpkin's bill is specially designed to pull snails from their shells. More

Picture of Aramus guarauna above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike.
Original source: ADubin
Author: ADubin
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Gruiformes
Family : Aramidae
Genus : Aramus
Species : guarauna
Authority : (Linnaeus, 1766)
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