Yellow-billed Loon

It breeds in the Arctic in Russia, Alaska and Canada and winters at sea mainly off the coasts of Norway and western Canada; it may sometimes be found on large inland lakes in winter. This species occasionally wanders south of its normal range into the United States, even as far south as Arizona .

Picture of the Yellow-billed Loon has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution.
Original source: Yellow-billed Loon
Author: Len Blumin from Mill Valley, California, United StatesCamera location

The Yellow-billed Loon is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

yellow-billed loon as a threatened or endangered species is warranted under the Endangered Species Act, but that listing is precluded by other higher priority species. The “warranted but precluded” finding was published in the Federal Register on March 25, 2009. The yellow-billed loon is now designated as a candidate species. Photo of a Yellow-billed Loon. More

This is where the Yellow-billed Loon was photographed from a floating fishing dock at point 6 on the Island across the London Bridge. Approximately 200 miles from Phoenix. ******************************************************************************** In the near future I will show some of the other birds I was able to photographed at Lake Havasu. More

Yellow-Billed Loon May Get Protection = Dan Joling, Associated Press small textlarge text Submit to: May 30, 2007 — A petition seeking Endangered Species Act protection for a rare loon that breeds in Alaska's National Petroleum Reserve has been accepted for review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. More

The Yellow-billed Loon or White-billed Diver, (Gavia adamsii), is the largest member of the loon or diver family of birds, at 76-97 cm (30-38 in) in length, a weight of 4-6.5 kg (8.8-14.3 lb) and a 135-160 cm (53-63 in) wingspan. It usually appears larger than the similar Great Northern Diver. It breeds in the Arctic in Russia, Alaska and Canada and winters at sea mainly off the coasts of Norway and western Canada; it may sometimes be found on large inland lakes in winter. More

png Yellow-billed Loon on Wikipedia.Wikipedia * Wikispecies-logo.svg Gavia adamsii on Wikispecies. Wikispecies: Gavia adamsii * Commons-logo.svg Gavia adamsii on Wikimedia Commons. Wikimedia Commons: Gavia adamsii Retrieved from "http://en.wiktionary. More

The Yellow-billed Loon has an an enormous range reaching up to around from 1 to 10 million square kilometers. This bird can be found throughout North America and in many areas of Europe including both native and vagrant populations in Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Austria, Bulgaria, Italy and many other areas. It is also present in Japan and Korea as well as the Russian Federation. More

Yellow-billed Loon - From Wormleysburg, on the Susquehanna River, Dauphin County - 4 May 2007 Yellow-billed Loon - From Wormleysburg, on the Susquehanna River, Dauphin County - 4 May 2007 Yellow-billed Loon - From Wormleysburg, on the Susquehanna River, Dauphin County - 4 May 2007 Yellow-billed Loon - From Wormleysburg, on the Susquehanna River, Dauphin County - 4 May 2007 More

Yellow-billed Loon - Gavia adamsiiThe Yellow-billed Loon is the largest of the loons, resembling a Common Loon in plumage but obviously larger and more heavily built. They are truly a bird of the north, breeding further north than the other commonly found loons in North America. In winter, the majority of birds are found in the north Pacific. Only a few are found as far south as the lower 48 states, and nearly all of those along the Pacific Coast. More

large, pale bill, the impressive Yellow-billed Loon is the largest of the world's five loon species. It is similar in appearance to the slightly smaller and far more numerous Common Loon, which has a black bill during the breeding season. In winter plumage, separating the two species can be more challenging. The Yellow-billed Loon is generally paler, with a larger, brighter, slightly upturned bill. More

As the Yellow-billed Loon is a resident of the remote Arctic tundra, exact population numbers are difficult to determine. Up to 6,000 birds (one quarter of the global population) are located within Alaska's North Slope. Further east, Yellow-billed Loons are found across the northernmost portions of Canada's Northwest Territories and western Nunavut. Away from North America, they breed across northern Siberia and winter in northern Scandinavia. More

yellow-billed loons nested in the Alpine area of NPR-A before construction in 1998, and the number nesting there during construction and operation of the oil field has not declined. Further, aerial surveys of the Colville River Delta have indicated an increase in the number of nests in the area, despite 40 years of oil and gas exploration and development. The increase of over 25% in the number of nests in the area was observed from 1983 to 2003. More

Yellow-billed Loon (Gavia adamsii), Lake Havasu Site 6, Mohave County Dave Krueper and Janet Ruth found this Yellow-billed Loon on 12 January 2008 on Lake Havasu, Site 6 marina. It was seen again on 2 February 2008 by Cindy Radamaker, Dave Powell and Kurt Radamaker. Kurt managed the first two very distant digiscoped pictures which remarkably manage to show key field marks. Oliver Niehuis also managed to photograph the bird on 9 February and James Smith digiscoped it again on 9 March 2008. More

Dan Barrett found this astonishing Yellow-billed Loon on Tempe Town Lake on 20 May 2008. It was photographed the same day by Michael Moore. The next day Jack Halloway got some rare flight shots of this species and Pierre Deviche some nice close ups. The bird continued to show well on 22 May 2008 when Brendon Grice also got some spectacular close ups. More

Yellow-billed Loon Protection Under Endangered Species Act Illegally Delayed Rare Bird Threatened by Oil Development and Global Warming in Alaska's Arctic ANCHORAGE, Alaska— In response to a court-ordered deadline, the Department of the Interior concluded that the yellow-billed loon warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act. More

Yellow-billed Loon is larger and heavier than the Common Loon, which it resembles. Its creamy yellow bill is angled up at the end. Breeding and non-breeding plumages are similar to those of the Common Loon. The size and the yellow bill are the most reliable distinguishing features. In non-breeding plumage, identification is difficult. Consult a good field guide. More

The yellow-billed loon (Gavia adamsii) has been proposed for listing as an endangered species in the U.S. and is listed in the Russian Red Book of endangered species. The Yellow-billed Loon: Connecting the Arctic - In 2009, BRI extended its collaborative effort to understand the yellow-billed loon (yblo) - underway since 2002 - into Canada and Russia. This past summer, researchers spent two weeks on Victoria Island in Nunavut Territory, Canada. More

Yellow-billed Loon lake southeast of Barrow, AK (note decoy on the ground) Learn More * Contact Us * Staff * Job Opportunities * Collaborators * Sponsors Diana Solovyova and her dog, Joy The Yellow-billed Loon is the tenth rarest breeding bird in the United States. More

Will there be other Yellow-billed Loons in Georgia? Probably. This one may even come back to Georgia someday (assuming it ever leaves). Each year more and more birders enter the field equipped with the latest field guides and the newest super optics. Add cell phones, online libraries, and e-mail, and the possibilities are endless. There will be birds found that seem incredible, but with this bird, there was an intersection of time, space, condition, expectation, excitement, and wonder that may never be repeated. More

* Comments: Yellow-billed Loons are the largest of the loons. Similar in breeding plumage to Common Loons, their heavy bill is yellow in all seasons and slightly angled upward. Along with the tendency to keep their head raised, Yellow-billed Loons have a unique silhouette. In nonbreeding plumage they do not have the jagged neck pattern of white on dark seen on Common Loons. More

The Yellow-billed Loon (Gavia adamsii) was long considered a species confined in the U.S. to Alaska and the northern Pacific coast. Reports of this species from inland states were viewed with doubt. That has all changed. Yellow-billed Loons have occurred across much of the western U.S., and in Texas virtually to the Mexican border in the Trans-Pecos area. The bird at right was photographed at Lake Balmorhea, Reeves Co., Texas in November, 1993 with a Canon T-90 & Sigma 500mm F/4.5 lens with a 1. More

Yellow-billed Loon - Wormleysburg, Dauphin County; May 4, 2007. Photo by Cameron Rutt. This near-breeding plumaged bird was found and photographed by Cameron Rutt. It was seen by many happy birders until the early morning of the 7th. The striking yellow bill with its straight upper mandible was extremely obvious. Also note the oval-shaped collar on the side of the neck. More

For the next hour, the Yellow-billed Loon would swim under and around the fishing pier, snacking on the large population of shad. We got fantastic close-up looks, and several wonderful photos, too. The photo above is through my digital camera sans scope. Hopefully Suzanne got some nice photos using my Canon 300mm lens. More

vues Cobrrdrr — 24 novembre 2006 — Juvenile Yellow-billed Loon at Erie Reservoir, Boulder County, Colorado, 11/24/06. Cobrrdrr — 24 novembre 2006 — Juvenile Yellow-billed Loon at Erie Reservoir, Boulder County, Colorado, 11/24/06. More

Picture of Gavia adamsii above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution.
Original source: Len Blumin from Mill Valley, California, United States external linkAuthor: Len Blumin from Mill Valley, California, United States external linkPermission: Some rights reserved
Order : Gaviiformes
Family : Gaviidae
Genus : Gavia
Species : adamsii
Authority : (Gray, 1859)
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