Congo Peacock

The Congo Peafowl, Afropavo congensis, is a species of peafowl. It is the only member of the monotypic genus Afropavo.

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The Congo Peacock is classified as Vulnerable (VU), considered to be facing a high risk of extinction in the wild.

CONGO PEACOCK Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Adult male The Congo Peacock was discovered in 1936, in the Sankuru district in central Congo. It was a sensational discovery, both because of its probable Asiatic affinities, but also that such a striking bird had eluded discovery for such a long time. There have been several expeditions later, trying to locate the Congo Peacock, and most of them have failed. More

Aspects of the topic Congo peacock are discussed in the following places at Britannica. Assorted References * Antwerp Zoo (in Antwerp Zoo (zoo, Antwerp, Belgium)) ...(25-acre) site in the centre of the city and is administered by the Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp. During the 1920s the zoo gained prominence for breeding the then newly discovered okapi and Congo peafowl. More

Male Congo Peacock, photo courtesy of Rhett @ Mongabay.com. More

The congo peacock and the grey parrot are both in TL2 forests and, after two years, finally here is their first post. The Congo Peacock (Afropavo congensis) exists only in the forests of D.R. Congo. It should be emblazoned on national uniforms or pressed into official seals. Not so. We are more often reminded of its presence by charred remains by campfires. Killing Congo Peacock is not worth comment – it is only a bird. More

Congo peacock (Afropavo congensis) was discovered in 1936 after a search that began in 1913 with the finding of a single feather. A male blue peacock (Pavo cristatus). In both species of Pavo, the male has a 90–130-centimetre (35–50-inch) body and 150-centimetre (60-inch) train of tail feathers that are coloured a brilliant metallic green. This train is mainly formed of the bird’s upper tail coverts, which are enormously elongated. More

The Congo peacock, of a different genus, was discovered by zoologists in 1937. The male is glossy black with a white crest, and has no train. The female is green and brown. The male peacock usually has a harem of two to five hens. The female lays three to eight whitish eggs that may be spotted with brown. Nests are built in secluded places on the ground or in low branches of trees. More

Congo Peacock : Afropavo congensis (found in the Congo basin in Africa) Major Sites : Indus river, Jammu and Kashmir, east Assam, south Mizoram and the whole of the Indian peninsula. National Bird of India The Indian peacock, Pavo cristatus (Linnaeus), the national bird of India, is a colourful, swan-sized bird, with a fan-shaped crest of feathers, a white patch under the eye and a long, slender neck. More

Congo peacock, inhabits African rain forests. Peafowl such as the blue peacock have been admired by humans and kept as pets for thousands of years. Selective breeding has created some unusual color combinations, but wild birds are themselves bursting with vibrant hues. They can be testy and do not mix well with other domestic birds. More

Very special about the Congo peacock is the fact that it has been discovered not until 1936. Textnapping: If you like this article, you may use it in your online publications. But it is required that you insert the following code into your page: This article was originally published at magazine.naturspot.de. Link to the original article The animal photos are NOT part of this permission. More

peacocks, the Congo peacock doesn't have a train of fancy feathers. More

blue and green male Congo peacock (Afropavo congensis) has a short rounded tail; the reddish and brown hen has a topknot. For more information on peacock, visit Britannica.com. Thesaurus: peacock - Top Home > Library > Literature & Language > Thesaurus verb To walk with exaggerated or unnatural motions expressive of self-importance or self-display: flounce, prance, strut, swagger, swank, swash. Informal sashay. See move/halt, self-love/modesty. More

Congo Peacock, Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Wikipedia, The. Congo Peafowl Home | Creature Maps | Cryptozoology Organizations | Cryptozoology Links | Cryptozoology Books & Films | Link to Me | Guestbook | Monster Mania The text on this page is copyright 2005 by Jamie Hall. Please use proper citation if you are using this website for research. More

The Congo Peacock is the largest gallinaceous bird to live in the African rainforest. It occurs in the Congolese lowland forests and is rather rare. It has a striking crest, but the male bird lacks the typical peacock tail. The More

A third type, the Congo peacock, was discovered recently in Africa. Unusual peacocks are the Argus pheasant, with eyelike spots on its secondary flight feathers, and the white peacock, thought to be a mutation of the common peafowl. When the term peafowl is used, peacock then refers to the male of a species and peahen to the female. More

The Congo peacock is found in Africa. Wild and free roaming peafowl have an omnivorous diet of worms, insects, small snakes, mice, seeds, berries, snails, frogs, grain, juicy grasses and bulbs. They need significant amounts of protein to be healthy and reproduce well. There are probably many thousands of peafowl in the US, however they can not exactly be called common. Their loud screams during mating season helps to discourage this. More

A third type, the Congo peacock, was discovered recently in Africa. Unusual peacocks are the Argus pheasant, with eyelike spots on its secondary flight feathers, and the white peacock, thought to be a mutation of the common peafowl. More

Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Congo Peacock Afropavo congensis Distribution map for Congo Peacock Congo More

holding the feathers of a Congo Peacock that he cooked the night before. Chapin, who was the first to describe Afropavo in 1936, said its closest relatives were the Asian peacocks. Many later disputed this, giving it closer connections to francolins or guinea fowl that are, after all, African. Not so – recent genetic studies agree with Chapin. Afropavo, unlike the more flamboyant Asian peacocks is monogamous with both male and female caring for a small clutch of young. More

Picture of Afropavo congensis above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike license.
Original source: Isidro Mart
Author: Isidro Mart
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Galliformes
Family : Phasianidae
Genus : Afropavo
Species : congensis
Authority : Chapin, 1936
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