Roseate Tern

S. d. dougallii breeds on the Atlantic coasts of Europe and North America, and winters south to the Caribbean and west Africa. Both the European and North American populations have been in long term decline, though active conservation measures have reversed the decline in the last few years at some colonies.

Picture of the Roseate Tern has been licensed under a GFDL
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The Roseate Tern is classified as Least Concern. Does not qualify for a more at risk category. Widespread and abundant taxa are included in this category.

The Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) is a seabird of the tern family Sternidae. This bird has a number of geographical races, differing mainly in bill colour and minor plumage details. S. d. dougallii breeds on the Atlantic coasts of Europe and North America, and winters south to the Caribbean and west Africa. Both the European and North American populations have been in long term decline, though active conservation measures have reversed the decline in the last few years at some colonies. More

wingtips on the standing bird, unlike Arctic and Roseate Terns, which extend past the wingtips. It is not as pale as the Roseate Tern and has longer wings. In winter, the forehead and underparts are white. Juvenile Common Terns show extensive ginger coloration and lack the 'scaly' appearance of juvenile Roseate Terns. The call is a clear piping, like that of the Arctic Tern, but lower-pitched and less strident. More

Coordinator for the Roseate Tern projects in Europe is Dr Stephen Newton : snewton@birdwatchireland.ie Before starting a cr-project : colours and codes have to be agreed with him , together with “European colour-ring Birding”. More

Roseate Tern The roseate tern is a graceful, slender, medium-sized tern. It is 14-17 inches in length with a wingspan of 29 to 32 inches. It has a long, sharp, black bill and a long, forked, white tail. During breeding season, it has a black cap, a silvery gray back, and a white breast and belly lightly tinged with pink. Its legs and feet are bright reddish-orange. In non-breeding season, its tail is shorter and its legs and feet are black. More

Roseate Tern in flight. The tropical forms ''S. d. korustes'' and ''S. d. bangsi'' are resident breeders from east Africa across the Indian Ocean to Japan. They have more red on the bill. The long-billed and short-winged ''S. d. gracilis'' breeds in Australia and New Caledonia. This species breeds in colonies on coasts and islands. It nests in a ground scrape, often in a hollow or under dense vegetation, and lays one or two (rarely three) eggs. More

feathers, the Roseate Tern is the epitome of elegance. Scarce everywhere, these small, graceful seabirds nest only on a few islands along the eastern seaboard. The Roseate's harsh, distinctive two-note call, and pink-hued breast, best seen at the beginning of the nesting season, are among their unique traits. Range & Distribution Widespread but very local, and rarely seen inland, Roseate Terns are found on all continents but Antarctica. More

Roseate Tern: Juvenile Default description Roseate Tern: Juvenile Roseate Tern: 1st Summer Default description Roseate Tern: 1st Summer Roseate Tern: Breeding Male Default description Roseate Tern: Breeding Male Related Birds Arctic Tern Common Tern Forster's Tern Least Tern General Roseate Tern: White below with slight, variable pinkish cast visible in good light; pale gray above with black cap and nape and More

Roseate terns are legally protected in New Hampshire. Possession and take (which includes harming, harassing, injuring and killing) is illegal. Distribution: Seavey Island, Isles of Shoals. The Roseate tern colony at the Isles of Shoals grew from 1 pair in 2001 to 112 pairs in 2004. Description: 14-17” in length. Light gray on top, white underneath and a black cap on head. Deeply forked tail and pointed wings are visible during flight. More

the Roseate Tern is primarily a tropical bird. It breeds across the globe in tropical oceans, and reaches into the temperate zone in the northern Atlantic, where it breeds in scattered localities. More

The Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) is listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as endangered because of its small population in the northeastern United States. More than half of the Roseate Terns in Maine nest on Eastern Egg Rock, making it a very important refuge (and an Important Bird Area) critical for their survival. More

Roseate TernThe Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) is a seabird of the tern family Sternidae. This bird has a number of geographical races, differing mainly in bill colour and minor plumage details. Distribution / Range S. d. dougallii breeds on the Atlantic coasts of Europe and North America, and winters south to the Caribbean and west Africa. More

Roseate Tern (in center of photo) Florida Strait, Dry Tortugas, FL April 2006 More

Roseate Tern Recovery In Buzzards Bay = Picture of a roseate tern. Rare and Threatened Bird Species - Roseate Tern One half of North America's breeding pairs of the Roseate terns (Sterna dougallii) can be found on two tiny islands in Buzzards Bay. The EPA classifies the species as endangered. More

mid-1990s and Roseate Terns have attempted to nest at several sites since. The main goal of the RTRP is to establish a secure nesting site for Roseate Terns on an island in Mahone Bay. This will be accomplished through habitat enhancement, predator deterrence, social attractants, and public awareness. The main threats to Roseate Terns include depredation by gulls, habitat loss due to development, and disturbance by recreational boaters. More

Roseate Tern Illustration Copyright More

The roseate tern is a graceful bird, 14 to 17 inches (36-43 cm) long, with a wingspan of about 30 inches (76 cm). It resembles the common tern. Its back and upper wings are a light pearly-grey, while its underparts are white. The tip of the white tail extends well beyond its wing tips when the bird is at rest. In the summer it has a black cap, nape and bill. Juveniles have prominent dark "V" s on the feathers of the back. More

The roseate tern is about 4O centimeters in length, with light-gray wings and back. Its first three or four primaries are black and so is its cap. The rest of the body is white, with a rosy tinge on the chest and belly during the breeding season. The tail is deeply forked, and the outermost streamers extend beyond the folded wings when perched. During the breeding season the basal three-fourths of the otherwise entirely black bill and legs turn orange-red. More

Roseate Tern Habitat Model go to: USFWS Gulf of Maine Watershed Habitat Analysis go to: Species Table Feedback: We welcome your suggestions on improving this model! Draft Date: March, 2001 Species: Roseate tern, Sterna dougallii dougallii Use of Study Area Resources: Reproduction; Roseate terns nest on outer coastal beach and island habitats from Nova Scotia to New York (Gochfeld et al. 1998). More

The Roseate Tern nests with Common and Arctic terns. More

Roseate Tern is similar to Common Tern though a good observation will highlight the Roseate’s almost white upperparts and underwings, longer tail and black bill. Distribution This is a rare species that can be found in Madeira and Azores archipelagos and very locally through Northwest Europe (mainly UK, North of France and Spain). It occurs in Madeira island, where it breeds, though there was breeding records of it in Porto Santo and Ilhéu de Fora in Selvagens sub-archipelago. More

Roseate Tern – Hollow, rotomolded polyethylene, 1” hole for wooden dowel or plastic plug. - Decoys along with nesting boxes, sound system and habitat enhancement are being used to establish a colony of Roseate Terns in Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia. Historically, this area once supported one-third of the Canadian Roseate Tern population but it was abandoned in the mid-1990’s. The Bluenose Coastal Action Foundation began this multifaceted project in 2004. More

Currently about 6,000-6,500 Roseate Terns breed in an area from the south shore of Long Island, New York, north to Nova Scotia, Canada. The Northeast U.S. breeding population was declared "Endangered" by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in December 1987; the Caribbean breeding population, which includes the birds nesting in Florida, was declared "Threatened." There is an unequal sex-ratio in the Northeast U.S. More

The Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) is a slender, medium-sized seabird with a forked tail flanked by streamers. In breeding plumage it is silvery-grey above and white below, the roseate color of its under side is rarely visible. It has a black cap, orange legs, and a black bill which may be reddish at the base. In non-breeding plumage, the legs and bill are black, and the tail loses its streamers. More

jointly as a Common and Roseate Tern banding project for three years. When Dr. Spendelow became the FITP's sole Director in 1981, he changed the focus of the project to concentrate on Roseate Tern research due to concerns about the declining North Atlantic breeding population of this species after documenting relatively low local return rates of ~ 75% (Spendelow and Nichols 1989). Dr. Sarah W. Richards, President of Little Harbor Laboratory (LHL) in Guilford, ran the project from 1983-1985 when Dr. More

the site of the third-largest Roseate Tern colony in the northeastern U.S. (Click here for a picture of a Roseate Tern) The tern colony at Falkner Island was visited irregularly in the early 1970s by people working in association with Helen Hays of the American Museum of Natural History's Great Gull Island Project. More

As with other Sterna terns, Roseate Tern feeds by plunge-diving for fish, almost invariably from the sea; it is much more marine than allied terns, only rarely visiting freshwater lagoons on the coast to bathe and not fishing in fresh water. It usually dives directly, and not from the "stepped-hover" favoured by Arctic Tern. The offering of fish by the male to the female is part of the courtship display. More

the rare and protected roseate tern as well as arctic, common and Sandwich terns and puffins.Tern team prepare breeding habitats by The Journal (Newcastle, England)Coquet Island is a very important breeding site for seabirds including the rare and protected roseate tern as well as arctic, common and sandwich terns and puffins.DOWN YOUR WAY.. by Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)The rarest bird we saw was a roseate tern, one of 10 seen so far this season. More

Picture of Sterna dougallii above has been licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike.
Original source: MPF
Author: MPF
Permission: Some rights reserved
Order : Charadriiformes
Family : Laridae
Genus : Sterna
Species : dougallii
Authority : Montagu, 1813
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